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This chapter is from the book

This chapter is from the book

Exploring Improved System Tools

As much as there might be to complain about in Windows 8, there are also some welcome improvements. In particular, Microsoft has improved some of the most-used system utilities, to make them more intuitive and easier to use.

For example, the new File Explorer, which replaces the old Windows Explorer, features an improved ribbon interface, like the one in recent versions of Microsoft Office. Instead of using pull-down menus to access obscure file management commands, the File Explorer ribbons put the most common operations front and center, and make them easier to do, too. Instead of pulling down the File menu to cut, copy, and paste files, just use the Move To and Copy To buttons on the File Manager’s Home ribbon. It’s a major improvement.

In addition, the Task Manager in Windows 8 is much easier to use and more informative than the one found in previous versions of Windows. You can use the new Task Manager to close frozen applications, view system performance, and even manage which programs automatically open when Windows starts up. (To open the Task Manager, right-click the Taskbar on the Desktop and select Task Manager.)

Finally, I’ve found that Windows 8 runs faster and more reliably than older versions of Windows—even on older PCs. So if you upgraded an old PC to Windows 8, it should seem zippier than it did before.

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