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Building a Bootable DVD to Deploy a Solaris Flash Archive

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  1. Building a Bootable Installation DVD-ROM
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This article provides techniques to augment a DVD-ROM-based installation with the services and behaviors typically provided by a JumpStart server. The techniques presented in this article can be used when you need to perform an automated installation of a Solaris Flash archive, but are unable to use a JumpStart server. This article describes a procedure to create a bootable installation DVD-ROM with a complete software stack on a DVD that you can use to perform a standardized and fully automated installation of the software stack from the DVD.

This article also examines the structure of a bootable Solaris OS DVD and provides information about modifying installation behaviors to perform an automated install of a Solaris Flash archive from a DVD.

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In some situations, you might need to perform an automated (hands-free) installation of a SolarisTM Flash archive (flar), but are unable to use a JumpStartTM server. For example, deploying software stacks in environments with any of the following constraints can inhibit the use of a network-based JumpStart server:

  • Disk space limitations

  • Many subnets that cannot have their own JumpStart server or other networking limitations

  • Remote locations with low-bandwidth network connections

In these situations, you can create a bootable installation DVD-ROM that essentially places a JumpStart server and complete software stack (the flar) on a DVD. You can then use this DVD to effect a standardized and fully automated installation of the software stack.

Using a DVD in this manner enables much more space to be used for the Solaris Flash archive than would be available with a CD-ROM. To execute the JumpStart framework and component installation programs, the DVD requires a Solaris miniroot that occupies approximately .5 gigabytes in slice 1 of the DVD. Standard DVD media has a capacity of approximately 4.7 gigabytes, therefore, after placing the miniroot and making the DVD bootable, approximately 4 gigabytes will be available for the flash archive (the payload) in slice 0 of the DVD.

This article assumes that you are familiar with the concepts of a "classic" JumpStart installation and Solaris Flash. It describes the boot and installation processes and explains how to adapt them to build bootable DVDs for custom system installations.

NOTE

The procedure described in this article is an extension of the procedure for building a bootable CD-ROM for the JumpStart installation described in the Sun BluePrintsTM book JumpStartTM Technology: Effective Use in the SolarisTM Operating Environment, by John S. Howard and Alex Noordergraaf, ISBN 0-13-062154-4.

Building a Bootable Installation DVD-ROM

This section examines the structure of a bootable SolarisTM 9 Operating System (Solaris OS) (for SPARC®) DVD and discusses the appropriate modifications to the default installation scripts that allow you to perform a JumpStart installation from DVD. Further, this section describes how to create a bootable Solaris 9 OS installation DVD for the SPARC platform. Additionally, the Solaris 9 CD Read/Write (CDRW) utilities are used to write the Solaris 9 OS bootable installation DVD. Although the CDRW utilities are named "CD," they are applicable to both CDs and DVDs. While several approaches and software applications are available for writing DVDs, this article uses commands available only in the standard Solaris 9 OS to create and write the bootable installation DVD.

The structure of the bootable installation DVD might vary with different versions of the Solaris OS, partly because of changes required to support additional hardware architectures. Additionally, changes to the Solaris OS from version to version might necessitate changes in the structure or layout of the DVD.

While there might be structural variances across versions or updates of the Solaris OS, the concepts and procedures presented here can be adapted or extended to create a bootable installation DVD for any of the current versions of the Solaris OS.

NOTE

The techniques presented in this section can be used to produce configurations that are not supported by Sun EnterpriseTM Services. However, this should not detract from their value.

Bootable DVD Structure

A bootable Solaris OS DVD has several components that are common to any other hard disk. The boot DVD is divided into several partitions (or slices) and a volume table of contents (VTOC) is used to provide the location and sizes of these slices. In addition to the VTOC, a typical installation DVD has six slices. Although the Solaris OS imposes the partitioning of the DVD into six slices, it is very important to note that the DVD is written as one session.

The following section describes the VTOC and the six slices of the Solaris 9 OS installation DVD.

Volume Table of Contents

The VTOC is located at cylinder 0, sector 0 on the DVD. You can examine the VTOC of any disk device with the prtvtoc command. The VTOC of the Solaris 9 OS Software DVD (the installation DVD) appears as follows.

lokoya# /etc/init.d/volmgt stop
lokoya# prtvtoc /dev/dsk/c0t6d0s0
* /dev/dsk/c0t6d0s0 partition map
*
* Dimensions:
*   512 bytes/sector
*   640 sectors/track
*    1 tracks/cylinder
*   640 sectors/cylinder
*  2048 cylinders
*  2048 accessible cylinders
*
* Flags:
*  1: unmountable
* 10: read-only
*
*             First   Sector  Last
* Partition Tag Flags  Sector   Count  Sector Mount Directory
    0   4  10     0  6026240  6026239
    1   2  10  6026240  1050880  7077119
    2   0  00  7077120   5120  7082239
    3   0  00  7082240   5120  7087359
    4   0  00  7087360   5120  7092479
    5   0  00  7092480   5120  7097599
lokoya# /etc/init.d/volmgt start

NOTE

The DVD and floppy volume management must be stopped in order to execute the prtvtoc command on a DVD. Volume management is then restarted after executing prtvtoc. All file systems mounted from the DVD will be unmounted and become inaccessible while volume management is stopped.

In contrast to a hard disk, the disk geometry that the Solaris OS uses for a DVD provides no distinction between a cylinder and a track. As the prtvtoc output illustrates, the disk label used for a DVD defines a cylinder as being composed of one track. Further, the prtvtoc output verifies that each track is defined as having 640 sectors and one sector is equal to 512 bytes.

It is important to note that the Solaris OS requires that all UFS file systems align on a cylinder boundary. For a DVD, this means that all UFS file systems on the DVD must begin on a sector that is a multiple of 640.

Slices

By reading the VTOC, the Solaris OS sees the DVD as having six slices. These six slices are described as follows:

  • Slice 0 contains the Solaris OS packages to be installed and is the on High Sierra File System (HSFS) partition of the DVD.

  • Slice 1 contains the generic kernel and the file system the install client will mount as / (root) after boot.

  • Slice 2 contains the boot block for the sun4c architecture.

  • Slice 3 contains the boot block for the sun4m architecture.

  • Slice 4 contains the boot block for the sun4d architecture.

  • Slice 5 contains the boot block for the sun4u architecture.

Slices 2 through 5 exist only to provide hardware architecture-specific boot blocks. As new hardware architectures are added and old architectures reach their end-of-lives, the uses of these slices might change. The file .slicemapfile in the top-level directory of slice 0 contains the mapping of a slice to the architecture supported.

As noted earlier, slice 0 is on the HSFS partition, and all other slices are on the UFS partitions. Slice 0 is also the largest of the slices and can incorporate any unused space on the DVD. The procedures detailed in this section augment the installation procedures in slice 0. However, there is a fixed upper limit in available space for slice 0 that limits our modifications. (The total space available on a standard DVD is 4.7 gigabytes.)

The distribution media for Solaris 9 OS supports four architectures. If the bootable installation DVD being created only needs to support one architecture, the space (slices) used by the unneeded architectures can be incorporated into slice 0, enlarging slice 0 at the expense of losing the ability to boot other architectures from that DVD.

It is also interesting to note that, other than the boot block, the only contents of slices 2 through 5 is the file .SUNW-boot-redirect in the top-level directory of each of those partitions. This file contains the character 1, which redirects the OpenBootTM PROM (OBP) boot loader to load the kernel from partition 1. This mechanism was added with Solaris 2.5 Operating Environment as a means of taking advantage of the hardware-independent nature of the kernel to optimize the utilization of space on the DVD.

Procedure Overview

Generally, this procedure extracts the contents of slice 0, then splices the desired installation behaviors into the contents of slice 0. The modifications made to slice 0 are to configure the bootable installation DVD to partition c0t0d0 as the boot device. The modifications then enable a fully automated installation of the Solaris 9 OS. The profile specifies that a Solaris Flash archive will be installed.

The following steps are the high-level tasks involved in creating a bootable DVD. The specific steps are described in the following section.

  1. Create and populate a work area, including copying in the flar.

  2. Modify the installation behaviors of slice 0.

  3. Assemble the individual slices into one DVD session and write them to the bootable installation DVD.

  4. Test the bootable installation DVD.

You can also use this procedure to create a bootable DVD without the JumpStart installation behaviors, by omitting step 2.

Procedure Specifics

For this example, lokoya is a SunTM Fire 6800 server running the Solaris 9 12/03 OS with the Solaris 9 12/03 OS CD/DVD creation utilities installed and configured as a JumpStart server. lokoya has a DVD-ROM writer connected at c3t2d0 (identified as cdrom0 by the cdrw -l command).

  1. Create and populate the work area, including copying in the flar.

  2. Verify the presence of the Solaris OS CD/DVD creation utilities.The Solaris 9 12/03 OS installation media is already mounted, and you can use /bidvd9 as the work area. /bidvd9 is a 12-gigabyte UFS file system. In our example, we created /bidvd9 as follows.

    lokoya# pkginfo SUNWmkcd SUNWcdrw
    system   SUNWcdrw    CD read and write utility for Solaris
    system   SUNWmkcd    CD creation utilities
    lokoya# newfs -m 1 /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s0
    newfs: construct a new file system /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s0: (y/n)? y
    [ ... additional output omitted for brevity ... ]
    lokoya# mkdir /bidvd9
    lokoya# mount /dev/dsk/c0t1d0s0 /bidvd9
    1. Populate the work area by extracting the partitions from the Solaris 9 OS software DVD.

    2. Because the contents of slice 0 will be manipulated, use the cpio command to copy out partition 0. Because no changes are made to the contents of slices 1 through 5, use dd to take those slices off the DVD. Before extracting slices 1 through 5, DVD and floppy volume management is stopped.

      lokoya# cd /cdrom/sol_9_1203_sparc
      lokoya# find s0 -print |cpio -pudm /bidvd9/s0
      lokoya# cd /bidvd9
      lokoya# /etc/init.d/volmgt stop
      lokoya# for i in 1 2 3 4 5
      > do
      > dd if=/dev/dsk/c0t6d0s${i} of=s9u5.s${i} bs=512
      > done
      1050880+0 records in
      1050880+0 records out
      5120+0 records in
      5120+0 records out
      5120+0 records in
      5120+0 records out
      5120+0 records in
      5120+0 records out
      5120+0 records in
      5120+0 records out

      NOTE

      All file systems mounted from the DVD are unmounted while volume management is stopped.

    3. Use the dd command to take the VTOC from the DVD and restart volume management as follows.

    4. Because the slice layout of the bootable installation DVD being created will not vary from the slice layout of the Solaris 9 OS DVD, the VTOC from the DVD can be used later for the bootable installation DVD.

      lokoya# dd if=/dev/dsk/c0t6d0s0 of=s9u5.dvd.vtoc bs=512 count=1
      1+0 records in
      1+0 records out
      lokoya# /etc/init.d/volmgt start
    5. Remove the unneeded files from slice 0.

    6. To make room on slice 0 for the Solaris Flash archive, you need to evacuate (or remove) the unneeded files from slice 0. The files you decide to remove will vary depending on your site's specific requirements. In general, because the flar will contain the complete software load to be installed, the package-based installation files in slice 0 are redundant. Specifically, the following files or directories are typically not needed when using a Solaris Flash archive:

      • Solaris packages in s0/Solaris_9/Product

      • Solaris supplemental software in s0/SW_Supp_CD

      • Solaris documentation in s0/1of2_Doc_CD and s0/2of2_Doc_CD

      The following sample shows how we removed the unneeded directories and how we copied the flar into the slice 0 workspace for our example. This step assumes that the Flash archive has already been created using flarcreate and was transferred to lokoya, the JumpStart server.

      lokoya# cd /bidvd9/s0/Solaris_9/Product
      lokoya# rm -rf *
      lokoya# cd /bidvd9/s0
      lokoya# rm -rf 1of2_Doc_CD 1of2_Doc_CD SW_Supp_CD
      lokoya# cp /jumpstart/FlashArchives/s9.archive \
      > /bidvd9/s0/Solaris_9/Product

      For information about creating and using Solaris Flash archives, refer to the Solaris 9 Installation Guide available at http://docs.sun.com or the Sun BluePrints book JumpStartTM Technology: Effective Use in the SolarisTM Operating Environment, by John S. Howard and Alex Noordergraaf, ISBN 0-13-062154-4.

  3. Modify the installation behavior of slice 0 by deleting the contents of the .install_config directory and adding the desired JumpStart rules and profile to this directory.

  4. It is important to note the archive_location profile keyword (shown in bold in the following example). This keyword instructs the JumpStart framework that the archive is to be found on a device local to the install client (local_file) and the location of the archive (/cdrom/Solaris_9/Product/s9.archive).

    Also, note that the parsed rules.ok file (the output from the check script), not the rules file, must be placed in the .install_config directory. If any begin or finish scripts are being used, place them in the .install_config directory as well.

    lokoya# cd /jumpstart
    lokoya# rm /bidvd9/s0/.install_config/*
    lokoya# cat bidvd9.profile
    install_type flash_install
    archive_location local_file /cdrom/Solaris_9/Product/s9.archive
    partitioning  explicit
    #
    # 2.0GB swap on a 36GB disk
    # 4 cylinders on slice 7 for SVM's MetaData
    #
    filesys     rootdisk.s0   free      /
    filesys     rootdisk.s1   1:1450      swap
    filesys     rootdisk.s7   1451:4      unnamed
    lokoya# cp /jumpstart/Profiles/bidvd9.profile > /bidvd9/s0/.install_config
    lokoya# cat rules
    any - - bidvd9.profile -
    lokoya# ./check
    Validating rules...
    Validating profile bidvd9.profile...
    The custom JumpStart configuration is ok.
    lokoya# cp rules.ok /bidvd9/s0/.install_config

    The setup of the installation profile directory is controlled by the profind script. Modify this script to redirect the configuration directory environment variable (${SI_CONFIG_DIR}) used by the JumpStart software to the .install_config directory on the bootable installation DVD. To make this change, edit the /bidvd9/s0/Solaris_9/Tools/Boot/usr/sbin/install.d/profind shell script and replace the cdrom() function with the following code.

    cdrom()
    {
      # Factory JumpStart is only allowed with factory
      # stub images, indicated by the file /tmp/.preinstall
      #
      if [ -f /tmp/.preinstall ]; then
       mount -o ro -F lofs ${CD_CONFIG_DIR} ${SI_CONFIG_DIR} >/dev/null 2>&1
       if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
         verify_config "defaults" "CDROM"
       fi
      fi
      gettext " <<< using DVD install_config >>>"; echo  # bidvd9
      rmdir ${SI_CONFIG_DIR}               # bidvd9
      ln -s /cdrom/.install_config ${SI_CONFIG_DIR}    # bidvd9
    }

    This modification instructs the installation process to use the .install_config directory that was populated with the desired JumpStart profiles and rules file.

  5. Assemble and write individual slices to the DVD.

  6. At this point, write the VTOC, the modified slice 0, and the unmodified slices 1 through 5 to the bootable installation DVD being created.

    1. Convert the modified slice 0.

    2. Before combining the slices and writing them to the DVD, use the mkisofs command to convert the modified slice 0 in the /bidvd9/s0 work area into an HSFS (iso9660) file system. Keep in mind that the iso9660 file system has some overhead, which increases the image (created by mkisofs).

    3. Combine the individual slices into one image to be written to a blank DVD.

    4. Write the VTOC, the modified slice 0, and the unmodified, combined slices 1 through 5 to the bootable installation DVD.

    5. Because no changes to the miniroot or supported architectures are required, slices 1 through 5 are extracted from the Solaris 9 OS software DVD and are written, unchanged, to the bootable installation DVD.

    6. It is important to note that mkisofs creates a VTOC at offset 0 within this image. Use the dd command to remove this invalid VTOC from the HSFS image by skipping the first 512 byte block.

    7. In our example, we removed the unneeded power management packages from the Product directory before creating the iso9660 file system from /bidvd9/s0.

      lokoya# cd /bidvd9
      lokoya# mkisofs -R -D -d -L -l -o s9u5.S0 s0
      Warning: creating filesystem that does not conform to ISO-9660.
      [ ... additional output omitted for brevity ... ]
       99.36% done, estimate finish Tue Apr 6 15:02:24 2004
       99.71% done, estimate finish Tue Apr 6 15:02:26 2004
      Total translation table size: 0
      Total rockridge attributes bytes: 7882055
      Total directory bytes: 22704128
      Path table size(bytes): 109482
      Max brk space used 3726000
      1409040 extents written (2752 Mb)
      lokoya# dd if=/bidvd9/s9u5.S0 of=/bidvd9/s9u5.s0 bs=512 skip=1
      5636159+0 records in
      5636159+0 records out
      lokoya# rm /bidvd9/s9u5.S0
    8. Pad the size for slice 0 to match the size specified in the VTOC.

    9. Because the VTOC specifies a size for slice 0, you must pad it to maintain the validity of the VTOC and to maintain the correct cylinder boundaries. The size of the pad is computed by adding one to the number of sectors in the HSFS slice 0 image (this accounts for the VTOC), and then subtracting that sum from the number of sectors (reported by prtvtoc earlier) in the unmodified slice 0 on the DVD. In our example, we created the pad using the dd command to read the appropriate number of zeros from /dev/zero as follows.

      lokoya# bc
      6026240-(5636159+1)
      390080
      lokoya# dd if=/dev/zero of=pad.s0 bs=512 count=390080
      390080+0 records in
      390080+0 records out
    10. Provide neecessary installation client identification information.

    11. As with any automated installation, sysidtool needs all installation client identification information such as hostname, IP address, and timezone. The location of this information varies depending on whether the installation client is connected to a network or off-network during the installation. If the installation client is connected to a network during installation, this information must be available from a name service such as NIS+ or NIS, or provided from the /etc/bootparams, /etc/ethers, and sysidcfg files from a host on the network. The minimum entries required in the /etc/bootparams file are shown.

      lokoya# cat /etc/bootparams
      barossa sysid_config=lokoya:/jumpstart/Sysidcfg/Solaris_9

      The sysidcfg file specified by /etc/bootparams appears as follows.

      lokoya# cat /jumpstart/Sysidcfg/Solaris_9/sysidcfg
      system_locale=en_US
      timezone=US/Pacific
      network_interface=primary {netmask=255.255.255.0
                    default_route=none
                    protocol_ipv6=no}
      terminal=vt100
      security_policy=NONE
      root_password=Q7jsh1m6IztTU
      name_service=NONE
      timeserver=localhost
    12. Automate the installation.

    13. To perform an automated installation without network connectivity, a sysidcfg file must be placed in the etc directory of the file system image taken from slice 1 of the Solaris 9 OS DVD. You can mount the file system image file using the Solaris 9 OS loopback file driver administration commands. After the file system image has been mounted, use standard Solaris OS commands to remove the symbolic link for the default sysidcfg file and a complete sysidcfg file can be copied to the file system image.

      lokoya# cat /bidvd9/sysidcfg
      system_locale=en_US
      timezone=US/Pacific
      network_interface=primary {hostname=barossa
                    ip_address=10.1.1.9
                    netmask=255.255.255.0
                    default_route=none
                    protocol_ipv6=no}
      terminal=vt100
      security_policy=NONE
      root_password=Q7jsh1m6IztTU
      name_service=NONE
      timeserver=localhost
      lokoya# lofiadm -a /bidvd9/s9u5.s1
      /dev/lofi/1
      lokoya# mount /dev/lofi/1 /mnt
      lokoya# ls -al /mnt/etc/sysidcfg
      lrwxrwxrwx  1 root   other     24 Nov 28 16:38 /mnt/etc/sysidcfg -> ../tmp/root/etc/sysidcfg
      lokoya# rm /mnt/etc/sysidcfg
      lokoya# cp /bidvd9/sysidcfg /mnt/etc/sysidcfg
      lokoya# umount /mnt
      lokoya# lofiadm -d /dev/lofi/1

      NOTE

      For the off-network automated installation, the host name, IP address, netmask, and IPv6 specification must be in the sysidcfg file.

    14. Concatenate and write the required information to the DVD writer.

    15. In our example, we concatenated the VTOC, HSFS image, padding, and unmodified images of slices 1 through 5 into one image and wrote the image to the DVD writer on device c3t2d0 by the cdrw command as follows.

      lokoya# cat s9u5.dvd.vtoc s9u5.s0 pad.s0 \
      s9u5.s1 s9u5.s2 s9u5.s3 s9u5.s4 s9u5.s5 >bidvd9.image
      lokoya# cdrw -l
      Looking for CD devices...
        Node      Connected Device      Device type
      ----------------------+--------------------------------+----------------
       cdrom0        | TOSHIBA DVD-ROM SD-R6112 1731 | CD Reader/Writer
      
      lokoya# cdrw -M
      Device : TOSHIBA DVD-ROM SD-R6112
      Firmware : Rev. 1731 (05/27/03)
      Media is blank
      lokoya# cdrw -d cdrom0 -i /bidvd9/bidvd9.image
      Initializing device...done.
      Preparing to write DVD
      Writing track 1...done.
      Finalizing (Can take upto 4 minutes)...done.
  7. Test the bootable installation DVD.

  8. To validate the newly created bootable installation DVD, place it in the DVD drive of the installation client, barossa. For our example, the client is off-network while the installation occurs and the sysidcfg file in the /etc directory of slice 1 of the DVD was modified, as shown in Step 3 on page 9. After issuing the boot cdrom command with the - install options to initiate the automated installation, barossa boots from the DVD and performs an automated installation of the Solaris 9 OS.

    For our example, this process appeared as follows.

    {2} ok boot cdrom - install
    Resetting ... 
    
    screen not found.
    Can't open input device.
    Keyboard not present. Using ttya for input and output.
    
    Sun Ultra 60 UPA/PCI (2 X UltraSPARC-II 450MHz), No Keyboard
    OpenBoot 3.27, 2048 MB memory installed, Serial #13409146.
    Ethernet address 8:0:20:c7:7:ff, Host ID: 80c707ff.
    
    
    
    Initializing Memory
    Rebooting with command: boot cdrom - install
    Boot device: /pci@1f,4000/scsi@3/disk@6,0:f File and args: - install
    SunOS Release 5.9 Version Generic_112233-10 64-bit
    Copyright 1983-2003 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.
    Use is subject to license terms.
    Configuring /dev and /devices
    Using RPC Bootparams for network configuration information.
    
    Skipping interface hme0
    Searching for configuration file(s)...
    Search complete.
    syslog service starting.
    savecore: no dump device configured
    Running in command line mode
    
    Please wait while the system information is loaded... 
    
    
    Please wait while the system is configured with your settings...
    Generating software table of contents [this may take a few minutes...]
    Table of contents complete.
    Starting Solaris installation program...
    Searching for JumpStart directory...
     <<< using DVD install_config >>>
    not found
    Checking rules.ok file...
    Using profile: bidvd.profile
    Executing JumpStart preinstall phase...
    Searching for SolStart directory...
    Checking rules.ok file...
    Using begin script: install_begin
    Using finish script: patch_finish
    Executing SolStart preinstall phase...
    Executing begin script "install_begin"...
    Begin script install_begin execution completed.
    
    Processing default locales
    	- Specifying default locale (en_US.ISO8859-1)
    
    Processing profile
    	- Opening Flash archive
    	- Validating Flash archive
    	- Selecting all disks
    	- Configuring boot device
    	- Using disk (c0t0d0) for "rootdisk"
    	- Configuring swap (c0t0d0s1)
    	- Configuring (c0t0d0s7)
    	- Configuring / (c0t0d0s0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c0t1d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c1t8d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c1t9d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c1t10d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c1t11d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c1t12d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c1t13d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c2t0d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c2t1d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c2t2d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c2t3d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c2t4d0)
    	- Deselecting unmodified disk (c2t5d0)
    
    Verifying disk configuration
    	- WARNING: Unused disk space (c0t0d0)
    
    Verifying space allocation
    	NOTE: 1 archives did not include size information
    
    Preparing system for Flash install
    
    Configuring disk (c0t0d0)
    	- Creating Solaris disk label (VTOC)
    
    Creating and checking UFS file systems
    	- Creating / (c0t0d0s0)
    
    Beginning Flash archive extraction
    
    Extracting archive: s9
    	Extracted  0.00 MB ( 0% of 1025.28 MB archive)
    	Extracted  1.00 MB ( 0% of 1025.28 MB archive)
    [ ... additional output omitted for brevity ... ]
    
    	Extracted 1024.00 MB ( 99% of 1025.28 MB archive)
    	Extracted 1025.00 MB ( 99% of 1025.28 MB archive)
    	Extracted 1025.28 MB (100% of 1025.28 MB archive)
    	Extraction complete
    
    Customizing system files
    	- Mount points table (/etc/vfstab)
    	- Unselected disk mount points (/var/sadm/system/data/vfstab.unselected)
    	- Network host addresses (/etc/hosts)
    
    Cleaning devices
    
    Customizing system devices
    	- Physical devices (/devices)
    	- Logical devices (/dev)
    
    Installing boot information
    	- Installing boot blocks (c0t0d0s0)
    
    Installation log location
    	- /a/var/sadm/system/logs/install_log (before reboot)
    	- /var/sadm/system/logs/install_log (after reboot)
    
    Flash installation complete
    Executing JumpStart postinstall phase...
    
    The begin script log 'begin.log'
    is located in /var/sadm/system/logs after reboot.
    
    Apr 6 16:32:13 rpcbind: rpcbind terminating on signal.
    syncing file systems... done
    rebooting...
    Resetting ... 
    
    screen not found.
    Can't open input device.
    Keyboard not present. Using ttya for input and output.
    Sun Ultra 60 UPA/PCI (2 X UltraSPARC-II 450MHz), No Keyboard
    OpenBoot 3.27, 2048 MB memory installed, Serial #13409146.
    Ethernet address 8:0:20:c7:7:ff, Host ID: 80c707ff.
    Initializing Memory
    Rebooting with command: boot
    Boot device: /pci@1f,4000/scsi@3/disk@0,0:a File and args: 
    SunOS Release 5.9 Version Generic_112233-10 64-bit
    Copyright 1983-2003 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.
    Use is subject to license terms.
    configuring IPv4 interfaces: hme0.
    Hostname: barossa
    Configuring /dev and /devices
    Configuring the /dev directory (compatibility devices)
    The system is coming up. Please wait.
    Configuring network interface addresses: hme0.
    starting rpc services: rpcbind done.
    Setting netmask of hme0 to 255.255.255.0
    Setting default IPv4 interface for multicast: add net 224.0/4: gateway barossa
    syslog service starting.
    volume management starting.
    Creating new RSA public/private host key pair
    Creating new DSA public/private host key pair
    The system is ready.
    
    barossa console login: 
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InformIT Promotional Mailings & Special Offers

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Overview


Pearson Education, Inc., 221 River Street, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030, (Pearson) presents this site to provide information about products and services that can be purchased through this site.

This privacy notice provides an overview of our commitment to privacy and describes how we collect, protect, use and share personal information collected through this site. Please note that other Pearson websites and online products and services have their own separate privacy policies.

Collection and Use of Information


To conduct business and deliver products and services, Pearson collects and uses personal information in several ways in connection with this site, including:

Questions and Inquiries

For inquiries and questions, we collect the inquiry or question, together with name, contact details (email address, phone number and mailing address) and any other additional information voluntarily submitted to us through a Contact Us form or an email. We use this information to address the inquiry and respond to the question.

Online Store

For orders and purchases placed through our online store on this site, we collect order details, name, institution name and address (if applicable), email address, phone number, shipping and billing addresses, credit/debit card information, shipping options and any instructions. We use this information to complete transactions, fulfill orders, communicate with individuals placing orders or visiting the online store, and for related purposes.

Surveys

Pearson may offer opportunities to provide feedback or participate in surveys, including surveys evaluating Pearson products, services or sites. Participation is voluntary. Pearson collects information requested in the survey questions and uses the information to evaluate, support, maintain and improve products, services or sites, develop new products and services, conduct educational research and for other purposes specified in the survey.

Contests and Drawings

Occasionally, we may sponsor a contest or drawing. Participation is optional. Pearson collects name, contact information and other information specified on the entry form for the contest or drawing to conduct the contest or drawing. Pearson may collect additional personal information from the winners of a contest or drawing in order to award the prize and for tax reporting purposes, as required by law.

Newsletters

If you have elected to receive email newsletters or promotional mailings and special offers but want to unsubscribe, simply email information@informit.com.

Service Announcements

On rare occasions it is necessary to send out a strictly service related announcement. For instance, if our service is temporarily suspended for maintenance we might send users an email. Generally, users may not opt-out of these communications, though they can deactivate their account information. However, these communications are not promotional in nature.

Customer Service

We communicate with users on a regular basis to provide requested services and in regard to issues relating to their account we reply via email or phone in accordance with the users' wishes when a user submits their information through our Contact Us form.

Other Collection and Use of Information


Application and System Logs

Pearson automatically collects log data to help ensure the delivery, availability and security of this site. Log data may include technical information about how a user or visitor connected to this site, such as browser type, type of computer/device, operating system, internet service provider and IP address. We use this information for support purposes and to monitor the health of the site, identify problems, improve service, detect unauthorized access and fraudulent activity, prevent and respond to security incidents and appropriately scale computing resources.

Web Analytics

Pearson may use third party web trend analytical services, including Google Analytics, to collect visitor information, such as IP addresses, browser types, referring pages, pages visited and time spent on a particular site. While these analytical services collect and report information on an anonymous basis, they may use cookies to gather web trend information. The information gathered may enable Pearson (but not the third party web trend services) to link information with application and system log data. Pearson uses this information for system administration and to identify problems, improve service, detect unauthorized access and fraudulent activity, prevent and respond to security incidents, appropriately scale computing resources and otherwise support and deliver this site and its services.

Cookies and Related Technologies

This site uses cookies and similar technologies to personalize content, measure traffic patterns, control security, track use and access of information on this site, and provide interest-based messages and advertising. Users can manage and block the use of cookies through their browser. Disabling or blocking certain cookies may limit the functionality of this site.

Do Not Track

This site currently does not respond to Do Not Track signals.

Security


Pearson uses appropriate physical, administrative and technical security measures to protect personal information from unauthorized access, use and disclosure.

Children


This site is not directed to children under the age of 13.

Marketing


Pearson may send or direct marketing communications to users, provided that

  • Pearson will not use personal information collected or processed as a K-12 school service provider for the purpose of directed or targeted advertising.
  • Such marketing is consistent with applicable law and Pearson's legal obligations.
  • Pearson will not knowingly direct or send marketing communications to an individual who has expressed a preference not to receive marketing.
  • Where required by applicable law, express or implied consent to marketing exists and has not been withdrawn.

Pearson may provide personal information to a third party service provider on a restricted basis to provide marketing solely on behalf of Pearson or an affiliate or customer for whom Pearson is a service provider. Marketing preferences may be changed at any time.

Correcting/Updating Personal Information


If a user's personally identifiable information changes (such as your postal address or email address), we provide a way to correct or update that user's personal data provided to us. This can be done on the Account page. If a user no longer desires our service and desires to delete his or her account, please contact us at customer-service@informit.com and we will process the deletion of a user's account.

Choice/Opt-out


Users can always make an informed choice as to whether they should proceed with certain services offered by InformIT. If you choose to remove yourself from our mailing list(s) simply visit the following page and uncheck any communication you no longer want to receive: www.informit.com/u.aspx.

Sale of Personal Information


Pearson does not rent or sell personal information in exchange for any payment of money.

While Pearson does not sell personal information, as defined in Nevada law, Nevada residents may email a request for no sale of their personal information to NevadaDesignatedRequest@pearson.com.

Supplemental Privacy Statement for California Residents


California residents should read our Supplemental privacy statement for California residents in conjunction with this Privacy Notice. The Supplemental privacy statement for California residents explains Pearson's commitment to comply with California law and applies to personal information of California residents collected in connection with this site and the Services.

Sharing and Disclosure


Pearson may disclose personal information, as follows:

  • As required by law.
  • With the consent of the individual (or their parent, if the individual is a minor)
  • In response to a subpoena, court order or legal process, to the extent permitted or required by law
  • To protect the security and safety of individuals, data, assets and systems, consistent with applicable law
  • In connection the sale, joint venture or other transfer of some or all of its company or assets, subject to the provisions of this Privacy Notice
  • To investigate or address actual or suspected fraud or other illegal activities
  • To exercise its legal rights, including enforcement of the Terms of Use for this site or another contract
  • To affiliated Pearson companies and other companies and organizations who perform work for Pearson and are obligated to protect the privacy of personal information consistent with this Privacy Notice
  • To a school, organization, company or government agency, where Pearson collects or processes the personal information in a school setting or on behalf of such organization, company or government agency.

Links


This web site contains links to other sites. Please be aware that we are not responsible for the privacy practices of such other sites. We encourage our users to be aware when they leave our site and to read the privacy statements of each and every web site that collects Personal Information. This privacy statement applies solely to information collected by this web site.

Requests and Contact


Please contact us about this Privacy Notice or if you have any requests or questions relating to the privacy of your personal information.

Changes to this Privacy Notice


We may revise this Privacy Notice through an updated posting. We will identify the effective date of the revision in the posting. Often, updates are made to provide greater clarity or to comply with changes in regulatory requirements. If the updates involve material changes to the collection, protection, use or disclosure of Personal Information, Pearson will provide notice of the change through a conspicuous notice on this site or other appropriate way. Continued use of the site after the effective date of a posted revision evidences acceptance. Please contact us if you have questions or concerns about the Privacy Notice or any objection to any revisions.

Last Update: November 17, 2020