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Using Masters, Part 2

Using Masters, Part 2

The First Page Master will likely have a masthead, a banner that runs across the front page usually including the name of the newsletter alongside things like the date, issue number, website address or a logo. It may well be that your company or organization has a corporate font, in which case this is a good place to use that typeface. On the other hand, where there isn’t a particular typeface you need to use, simple sans serif typefaces might be favored for their clarity and legibility, though serif fonts can certainly work—for example, Felix Titling, a serif font designed expressly for this sort of thing. Color may be useful here, but if the masthead is the only place colored text is used, the result can be a bit amateurish. If you want to use color, a good effect will be obtained if the colored text used on the masthead is replicated on article titles and other such items.

Mastheads are often placed at the top of the page, with the text center-aligned. That’s a fine approach and used by many traditionalist newspapers. But using left-aligned text and putting the title in a box in the left-hand corner creates a very different effect, and will often be seen on more modern publications such as tech and hobby magazines. By choosing the Vertical Text Box tool under Insert on the Home tab of the Ribbon, you can even create a masthead running along the left- or right-hand edges of the front page. The result may be more difficult to read, but the edgier feel it provides has its place where style and sophistication are the aim.

Sometimes objects will need to be behind other objects or in front of them. Word has a new way to organize objects, accessed via the Reorder Objects tool on the Home tab of the Ribbon. When clicked, Word switches to an all-black screen with colored layers representing each item on the page (see Figure 4). Drag these to the left to push them towards the back of the document, or right to pull them forwards. When you’re finished, click OK.

Figure 4 Reordering objects may be needed if they overlap or obscure one another.

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