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Publishing Layout

Publishing Layout

If the supplied templates don’t appeal to you, it’s easy to create your own design from scratch. Page layout is done in Publishing Layout mode, selected from the View menu. While most tools work just as they do in word processor mode (called Print Layout under the View menu), there is a difference in how text is edited. Text is placed in text boxes, and text can be moved about the page as required. Text can be flowed from one text box to another, which makes it far easier to create multi-column arrangements of text than is the case when Word is used as a word processor (see Figure 2). Images boxes handle images in the same sort of way, and different types of formatting tools can be used to enhance their appearance.

At the bottom-right are two tabs labeled All Contents and Master Pages. These toggle the user between the two different windows, the first being the actual document and the second one or more master pages from which each page in the main document is derived. The master pages are used to contain text boxes and other objects that will appear on all pages based on a particular master. Putting such objects on a master ensures they aren’t forgotten about, moved, or deleted by accident.

By default, a single master will be used throughout, but that doesn’t have to be the case. A unique first-page master can be created, perhaps with a masthead running along the top. Word can also create odd- and even-numbered page masters, so that things that are located differently on odd- and even-numbered pages, such as page numbers or running titles, can be positioned accordingly.

Figure 2 Add text boxes where you want text to appear, one box for each column or banner.

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