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Peer Reviews in Software: A Practical Guide

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Peer Reviews in Software: A Practical Guide

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  • Copyright 2002
  • Dimensions: 7-3/8" x 9-1/4"
  • Pages: 256
  • Edition: 1st
  • Book
  • ISBN-10: 0-201-73485-0
  • ISBN-13: 978-0-201-73485-0

Peer review works: it leads to better software. But implementing peer review can be challenging -- for technical, political, social, cultural, and psychological reasons. In this book, best-selling software engineering author Karl Wiegers presents succinct, easy-to-use techniques for formal and informal software peer review, helping project managers and developers choose the right approach and implement it successfully. Wiegers begins by discussing the cultural and social aspects of peer review, and reviewing several formal and informal approaches: their implications, their challenges, and the opportunities they present for quality improvement. The heart of the book is an in-depth look at the "nuts and bolts" of inspection, including the roles of inspectors, planning, examining work products, conducting code review meetings; improving the inspection process, and achieving closure. Wiegers presents a full chapter on metrics, and then addresses the process and political challenges associated with implementing successful software review programs. The book concludes with solutions to special review challenges, including large work products and software created by distributed development teams. For all developers, project managers, business analysts, quality engineers, testers, process improvement leaders, and documentation specialists.

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Table of Contents



Preface.

My Objectives.

Intended Audience.

Reading Suggestions.

Acknowledgments.



1. The Quality Challenge.

Looking Over the Shoulder.

Quality Isn't Quite Free.

Justifying Peer Reviews.

Peer Reviews, Testing, and Quality Tools.

What Can Be Reviewed.

A Personal Commitment to Quality.



2. A Little Help from Your Friends.

Scratch Each Other's Back.

Reviews and Team Culture.

The Influence of Culture.

Reviews and Managers.

Why People Don't Do Reviews.

Overcoming Resistance to Reviews.

Peer Review Sophistication Scale.

Planning for Reviews.

Guiding Principles for Reviews.



3. Peer Review Formality Spectrum.

The Formality Spectrum.

Inspection.

Team Review.

Walkthrough.

Pair Programming.

Peer Deskcheck.

Passaround.

Ad Hoc Review.

Choosing a Review Approach.



4. The Inspection Process.

Inspector Roles.

The Author's Role.

To Read or Not To Read.

Inspection Team Size.

Inspection Process Stages.

Planning.

Overview.

Preparation.

Meeting.

Rework.

Follow-up.

Causal Analysis.

Variations on the Inspection Theme.

Gilb/Graham Method.

High-Impact Inspection.

Phased Inspections.



5. Planning the Inspection.

When to Hold Inspections.

The Inspection Moderator.

Selecting the Material.

Inspection Entry Criteria.

Assembling the Cast.

Inspector Perspectives.

Managers and Observers.

The Inspection Package.

Inspection Rates.

Scheduling Inspection Events.



6. Examining the Work Product.

The Overview Stage.

The Preparation Stage.

Preparation Approaches.

Defect Checklists.

Other Analysis Techniques.



7. Putting Your Heads Together.

The Moderator's Role.

Launching the Meeting.

Conducting the Meeting.

Reading the Work Product.

Raising Defects and Issues.

Recording Defects and Issues.

Watching for Problems.

Product Appraisal.

Closing the Meeting.

Improving the Inspection Process.



8. Bringing Closure.

The Rework Stage.

The Follow-Up Stage.

The Causal Analysis Stage.

Inspection Exit Criteria.



9. Analyzing Inspection Data.

Why Collect Data?

Some Measurement Caveats.

Basic Data Items and Metrics.

The Inspection Database.

Data Analysis.

Measuring the Impact of Inspections.

Effectiveness.

Efficiency.

Return on Investment.



10. Installing a Peer Review Program.

The Peer Review Process Owner.

Preparing the Organization.

Process Assets.

The Peer Review Coordinator.

Peer Review Training.

Piloting the Review Process.



11. Making Peer Reviews Work for You.

Critical Success Factors.

Review Traps to Avoid.

Troubleshooting Review Problems.



12. Special Review Challenges.

Large Work Products.

Geographical or Time Separation.

Distributed Review Meeting.

Asynchronous Review.

Generated and Nonprocedural Code.

Too Many Participants.

No Qualified Reviewers Available.



Epilogue.


Appendix A: Peer Reviews and Process Improvement Models.

Capability Maturity Model for Software.

Goals of the Peer Reviews Key Process Area.

Activities Performed.

Commitment to Perform.

Ability to Perform.

Measurement and Analysis.

Verifying Implementation.

Systems Engineering Capability Maturity Model.

CMMI-SE/SW.

Prepare for Peer Reviews.

Conduct Peer Reviews.

Analyze Peer Review Data.

ISO 9000-3.



Appendix B: Supplemental Materials.

Work Aids.

Other Peer Review Resources.



Glossary.


Index.

Preface

No matter how skilled or experienced I am as a software developer, requirements writer, project planner, tester, or book author, I'm going to make mistakes. There's nothing wrong with making mistakes; it is part of what makes me human. Because I err, it makes sense to catch the errors early, before they become difficult to find and expensive to correct.

It's often hard for me to find my own errors because I am too close to the work. Many years ago I learned the value of having some colleagues look over my work and point out my mistakes. I always feel a bit sheepish when they do, but I prefer to have them find the mistakes now than to have customers find them much later. Such examinations are called peer reviews. There are several different types of peer reviews, including inspections, walkthroughs, and others. However, most of the points I make in this book apply to any activity in which someone other than the creator of a work product examines it in order to improve its quality.

I began performing software peer reviews in 1987; today I would never consider a work product complete unless someone else has carefully examined it. You might never find all of the errors, but you will find many more with help from other people than you possibly can on your own. The manuscript for this book and my previous books all underwent extensive peer review, which contributed immeasurably to their quality.

My Objectives

There is no "one true way" to conduct a peer review, so the principal goal of this book is to help you effectively perform appropriate reviews of deliverables that people in your organization create. I also address the cultural and practical aspects of implementing an effective peer review program in a software organization. Inspection is emphasized as the most formal and effective type of peer review, but I also describe several other methods that span a spectrum of formality and rigor. Many references point you to the extensive literature on software reviews and inspections.

Inspection is both one of the great success stories of software development and something of a failure. It's a grand success because it works! Since it was developed by Michael Fagan at IBM in the 1970s, inspection has become one of the most powerful methods available for finding software errors Fagan, 1976. You don't have to just take my word for it, either. Experiences cited from the software literature describe how inspections have improved the quality and productivity of many software organizations. However, only a fraction of the software development community understands the inspection process and even fewer people practice inspections properly and effectively. To help you implement inspections and other peer reviews in your team, the book emphasizes pragmatic approaches that any organization can apply.

Several process assets that can jumpstart your peer review program are available from the website that accompanies this book, http://www.processimpact.com/pr_goodies.shtml. These resources include review forms, defect checklists, a sample peer review process description, spreadsheets for collecting inspection data, sources of training on inspections, and more, as described in Appendix B. You are welcome to download these documents and adapt them to meet your own needs. Please send your comments and suggestions to me at kwiegers@acm.org. Feedback on how well you were able to make peer reviews work in your team is also welcome.

Intended Audience

The material presented here will be useful to people performing many project functions, including:

  • work product authors, including analysts, designers, programmers, maintainers, test engineers, project managers, marketing staff, product managers, technical writers, and process developers
  • work product evaluators, including quality engineers, customer representatives, customer service staff, and all those listed above as authors
  • process improvement leaders
  • managers of any of these individuals, who need to know how to instill peer reviews into their cultures and also should have some of their own deliverables reviewed

This book will help people who realize that their software product's quality falls short of their goals and those who want to tune up their current review practices, establish and maintain good communications on their projects, or ship high-quality software on schedule. Organizations that are using the Capability Maturity Model for Software" or the CMMI for Systems Engineering/Software Engineering will find the book valuable, as peer reviews are components of those process improvement frameworks (see Appendix A).

The techniques described here are not limited to the deliverables and documents created on software projects. Indeed, you can apply them to technical work products from any engineering project, including design specifications, schematics, assembly instructions, and user manuals. In addition to technical domains, any business that has documented task procedures or quality control processes will find that careful peer review will discover errors that the author simply cannot find on his own.

Reading Suggestions

To gain a detailed understanding of peer reviews in general and inspections in particular, you can simply read the book from front to back. The cultural and social aspects of peer reviews are discussed in Chapters 1 and 2. Chapter 3 provides an overview of several different types of reviews and suggests when each is appropriate. Chapters 4 through 8 address the nuts and bolts of inspection, while Chapter 9 describes important inspection data items and metrics. If you're attempting to implement a successful review program in an organization, focus on Chapters 10 and 11. For suggestions on ways to deal with special review challenges, such as large work products or distributed development teams, see Chapter 12. Refer to the Glossary for definitions of many terms used in the book.



0201734850P07232001

Index

Ability to Perform, 190, 191-192
Accountability, 147
Active design reviews, 92
Active listening, 104
Activities Performed, 190
Ad hoc reviews, 2, 27, 41, 61, 161, 189
Adobe Portable Document Format, 76, 149
Aids, work, for peer reviews 75, 149, 199
Allott, Stephen, 162
Analysis
causal analysis stage and, 121-123
in High-Impact(TM) Inspections, 58-59
of early reviews, 161
problems with, 171-172
traceability and, 89-90
Analysis techniques
for code, 92-94, 122
defect patterns, 171
for design documents, 92
inspection data, 125-142
models, 91
for requirements specifications, 90-92
for user interface designs, 92
work product, 87, 88-94, 175-176
Analyst, requirements
participation in reviews, 71
review benefits for, 25
Appraisals, of work products, 34, 53-54, 56, 100, 113-114, 120, 131, 168
Architect, participation in reviews, 71
Architecture design, review participants, 71
ARM (Automated Requirement Measurement) Tool, 90
Assets, process, xii, 149-151
Asynchronous reviews, 41, 54, 178, 180-181
AT&T Bell Laboratories, 7, 54
Attention-getting devices, 101
Audioconferencing, 178, 179
Author
asynchronous reviews and, 180
culture and, 15, 16-17
data privacy and, 128
defects and, 105-106, 115, 127-128, 171
deposition meetings and, 55
egos, 12, 14, 15, 29, 46
follow-up and, 56, 119-120
inspection goals, 87, 100
inspection moderators and, 64, 66
inspections and, 34, 35, 46-47, 61, 62, 64, 72, 102, 105-106
issue log and, 115
material selection and, 66
misuse of data and, 18-20, 73
overview and, 52, 82
pair programming and, 38
participation in reviews, 71
peer deskchecks and, 39
performance assessments and, 18-20
perspectives and, 72
planning and, 52, 61
preparation time and, 86
questions and, 86
respect and, 16-17
rework and, 55, 117-119, 120, 121
role of, 46-47
walkthroughs and, 37, 38
Automated Requirement Measurement (ARM) Tool, 90
Bad fixes, 66, 120, 172
Beizer, Boris, 109
Bell Northern Research, 7
Benefits
inspections, 7, 34, 37, 54-55
metrics, 126-127, 192
peer reviews, 3-8, 23-25, 185-186
Best practices, inspection 161-162
Body language, 105, 179
Boeing Company, The, 49
Buddy check. See Peer deskcheck
Bugs. See Defects
Bull HN Information Systems, 49
Caliber-RM, 90
Capability Maturity Model, Integrated (CMMI-SE/SW), xiii, 187, 194-197
Capability Maturity Model, Systems Engineering (SE-CMM), 187, 193-194
Capability Maturity Model for Software (SW-CMM), xiii, 187-193
Causal analysis, defect, 52, 56, 57, 121-123, 126
Certification of moderators, 155
Challenges, special review, 175-183
Champion, review, 161, 164
Change
pain as motivation for, 146
preparing organization for, 144-149
Checklists
defect, xii, 33, 39, 75, 84, 87-88, 89, 170, 171, 196, 199
design documents and, 92
Gilb/Graham method and, 57
inspection moderator's, 33, 96-98, 150
phased inspections and, 59
role in inspections, 69
use in preparation, 53, 87-88
Checkpoints
inspection, 62
review, 10-11, 167
Choosing a review method, 31, 32, 41-43
Closed cultural paradigm, 22-23
CMMI-SE/SW (Capability Maturity Model, Integrated), xiii, 187, 194-197
Coaching through reviews, 40
Code
analysis techniques for, 92-94, 122, 129
error-prone, 41, 57
generated, 181
inspecting, 63, 83, 181
inspection package for, 75
nonprocedural, 181
review participants, 71
static analysis of, 63
Code-counting conventions, 129
Coding standards, 164
Collaborative Software Review System (CSRS), 180-181
Collaborative usability inspection, 92
Colleagues, review process and, 13-30, 37, 40
Commitment, management 17-18, 160
Commitment to Perform, 190, 191
Communication, 16-17, 144, 145, 177, 178
Comparisons, review characteristics, 36
Compilation, as code inspection entry criterion, 122
Complexity, 77, 78
Constantine, Larry L., 22
Control charts, 136-137
Coordinator, peer review, 20, 22, 115, 121, 151-152, 164, 166, 174, 191
Costs
choosing review approach and, 42
early stage and, 12, 141
inspection effectiveness and, 139
inspection efficiency and, 140
inspection team size and, 49, 182
of inspections, 11, 100, 120, 140, 141, 142
metrics and, 132-133
quality and, 3-6
requirements specifications and, 91-92
return on investment and, 140-142
review programs and, 3-4, 148-149, 191, 192
sampling and, 67
team reviews and, 35
vs. benefits of reviews, 8
Coverage, test measurement, 9
Critical success factors for reviews, 159-161
Cross-training, as review benefit, 8, 24, 141, 159, 183
CSRS (Collaborative Software Review System), 180-181
Cultural paradigms, 22
Culture, 12, 13, 15-25
authors and, 15, 16-17
data and, 127
guiding review principles and, 29
management and, 191
pair programming and, 38, 39
peer deskchecks and, 40
preparation and, 102
problems and, 164, 165-167, 177-178
selecting review process and, 32
signing inspection summary reports and, 114
successful program and, 143
Customers, 4, 5, 16, 23, 138, 139, 141, 146, 159, 163
as review participants, 71, 71, 72, 163-164
Data
analyzing, 125-142, 150
authors and, 128
benefits of, 126-127, 192
CMMI-SE/SW (Capability Maturity Model, Integrated) and, 196
collection of, 125-127, 129, 148, 150, 169, 174
CMM key practices and, 190
inspection summary report and, 54, 98-100, 114-115, 121, 150, 151
management and, 173
metrics and, 126-129
misuse of, 18-20, 73, 127-128, 165, 173-174
overanalyzing, 129
privacy of, 128
problems with, 173-174
spreadsheet, xii, 129, 131, 135, 151, 199
storing, 150
time and, 29
verification and, 192
Data items, 100, 129, 130-131, 150
Database, inspection, 129, 131, 135, 151
Debugging, 24
Decision rules, 113-114
Defect causal analysis, 52, 56, 57, 121-123, 126
Defect checklists, xii, 33, 39, 75, 84, 87-88, 89, 170, 171, 196, 199
Defect containment, 138
Defect density, 58, 67, 123, 124, 125, 126, 128, 132, 135, 136, 138, 142
Defect list/log. See Issue log
Defect reviews, 194
Defect-tracking systems, 118
Defects
authors and, 105-106, 115, 127-128, 171
bad fixes, 66, 120, 172
classification of, 108-110, 122, 170
corrected, 107, 121, 131, 132, 134
cost of, 3-4, 139, 140, 141
counting, 106
data items and, 131
definition of, 2
error-prone modules, 41
found, 107, 121, 130-131, 132, 133
inspection rates and, 76-77
major or minor, 41, 109-110, 117-118, 121, 123, 129, 131, 133, 168, 171-172
measurement dysfunction and, 19, 128
metrics and, 132
origin of, 108
pointing out, 105-107
prevention, 4-5, 122, 141, 159, 189
problems with, 170-172
recording, 107-110
secondary, 120
severity of, 109, 112
synergy and, 34
types of, 108-110, 122
typos vs., 85
verification and, 192
Deliverables. See Work products
Deposition meetings, 55
Description, peer reviews, xi, 2-3
Designs
analysis techniques for, 92
inspecting, 92
review participants, 71, 92
Deskchecks, 15, 39, 86
Detail design, review participants, 71
Developer, review benefits for, 24
Development manager, review benefits for, 24
Direct analysis, 58
Disposition. See Appraisals, of work products
Distributed reviews, 178-180
Documentation, reviewing system technical, 71
Documented processes, 147, 149-151, 162, 190, 196
Dynamic analysis, 11
Dysfunction, measurement, 19, 128
Effectiveness, inspection
data analysis and, 135, 138-140
early reviews and, 161
entry criteria and, 68
Gilb/Graham method and, 57
inspection rates and, 77
inspectors and, 33
metrics and, 121, 126, 132
preparation and, 101
problems, 169-172
quality and, 100
team size and, 49
vs. informal reviews, 34
Efficiency, inspection
culture and, 19
data analysis and, 135, 138, 138n, 140
entry criteria and, 68
experience and, 146
inspection rates and, 77
metrics and, 121, 132
team size and, 49
Effort
inspection, 132
meeting, 130
overview, 130
planning, 130
preparation, 130
rework, 130
Egoless programming, 14
Egos, 12, 14, 15, 29, 46, 185
80/20 rule, 121-122
Electronic collection or distribution, 40-41, 75-76, 78, 108, 149, 150
Entry criteria, inspection, 67-69, 149, 192
Error-prone modules, 41, 57
Estimating time, 28
Excuses for not doing reviews, 20, 21
Exit criteria, inspection, 27, 36, 123-124, 150, 192, 196
Extreme Programming, 38
Face-to-face meetings, 41, 178, 180
Facial expressions, 105, 179
Fagan, Michael, xii, 34, 45, 47, 51-52, 55, 57
Faults. See Defects
Federal Systems Division, IBM, 35
Finding problems vs. solving problems, 29, 101, 112, 164, 170
Follow-up, 56, 113, 119-121, 129, 167, 172
Ford Motor Company, 37
Formal, Technical, Asynchronous Review Method (FTArm), 180
Formal reviews, 12, 27, 29, 32, 61, 125-126, 175
Formality spectrum, peer review, 31-41
Freedman, Daniel, 67, 110
Frequency and types of reviews, 161
Fritsch, Jim, 190
FTArm (Formal, Technical, Asynchronous Review Method), 180
Gelperin, David, 58, 115
Generated code, 181
Geographical concerns, 41, 177, 192
Gilb, Tom, and Dorothy Graham, 57
Software Inspection, 88
Gilb/Graham inspection method, 57-58, 77
Goal-Question-Metric (GQM), 126
Goals, peer review program, 161
Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, 90
GQM (Goal-Question-Metric), 126
Grady, Robert, 141
Guide to Classification for Software Anomalies (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), 109
Guiding principles for peer reviews, 29-30
Habits of effective inspection teams, 162
Hardlook(TM) Analysis Matrix, 58
Heuristic evaluations, 92
Hewlett-Packard Company, 7, 47, 109, 141
Hierarchical defect classification, 109
High-Impact(TM) Inspections, 58
HTML, peer review documentation and, 149
IBM, xii, 7, 9, 35, 45, 109
Identification of individual reviews, 100
IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)
Standard 1044.1-1995, Guide to Classification for Software Anomalies, 109
Standard 1028-1997, Standard for Software Reviews, 11
Imperial Chemical Industries, 7
Improvement models, process, 187-197
Indirect analysis, 58
Informal reviews, 22, 26, 27, 30, 32, 34, 35-42, 161, 162, 165, 170, 172, 175
Infosys Technologies, Ltd., 77
Infrastructure for peer reviews, 143, 196
Inspection database, 129, 131, 135, 151
Inspection Lessons Learned questionnaire, 115, 116, 150, 161, 199
Inspection moderator. See Moderator, inspection
Inspection package, 74-76, 78
contents of, 52, 53, 75
distributing to inspectors, 52, 74, 82
Inspection summary report, 54, 98-100, 114-115, 121, 150, 151, 199
Inspections, xii, 3, 22, 31, 32, 33-34, 35
authors and, 34, 35, 46-47, 61, 62, 64, 72, 102, 105-106
benefits of, 7, 34, 37, 54-55
best practices, 161-162
Capability Maturity Model, Integrated (CMMI-SE/SW) and, 196
Capability Maturity Model for Software (SW-CMM) and, 190
characteristics of, 36
costs of, 11, 100, 120, 140, 141, 142
data analysis, 125-142
data items, 129, 130-131
database for, 129, 131, 135, 151
documents, 51, 63, 75
effectiveness and, 33, 34, 49, 57, 68, 77, 100, 101, 121, 126, 132, 135, 138-140, 161, 169-172
efficiency and, 19, 34, 49, 68, 77, 121, 132, 135, 138, 138n, 140, 146
entry criteria, 67-69, 149, 192
exit criteria, 27, 123-124, 150, 192, 196
Gilb/Graham method, 57-58
High-Impact(TM), 58
improving, 115
management and managers' participation in, 54, 66, 73-74
measuring impact of, 138-142
meetings, 53-55, 57, 58, 78, 95-116
metrics, 34, 54, 55, 57, 77, 100, 106, 116, 119, 121, 126, 127-129, 150
N-fold, 49
number of participants, 29, 48-49
participants, 69-74, 79, 131, 169, 182
phased, 59
planning, 61-79
preparation and, 30
procedures for, 149
process, 45-59
rates, 30, 52, 57, 76-78, 123, 126, 133-134, 136
ROI from, 6-8, 12, 58, 138, 140-142, 159, 175
roles of team members in, 46-48
stages, 50-56
steps, 51-52
team size, 29, 48-49
timing of, 32, 33-34, 62-64, 161, 172, 175
training, 126
traps, 162-164
variations of, 56-59
vs. informal reviews, 40, 53, 170
when to hold, 32, 33-34, 62-64, 161, 172, 175
Inspectors
choosing, 69-73, 162
finding, 183
number of, 29, 48-49
perspectives, 52, 70-73
preparation and, 84, 85
project roles represented, 70-72
scheduling events and, 79
source code analysis and, 92
training, 33, 146, 183
Installing a peer review program, 143-157
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). See IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)
Integrated Capability Maturity Model (CMMI-SE/SW), xiii, 187, 194-197
Internet-based collaboration tools, 179
Intranets, 78, 149
ISO 9000-3, 187, 197
Issue log
closure and, 117
confidentiality of, 115
follow-up and, 121
inspection package and, 75
inspectors and, 113
online, 179
personal, 84, 101, 102
process description and, 150
recorders and, 107-108
style issues and, 164
Web site for, 199
Issues, 107-110, 108, 119
pointing out, 105-107
J-curve. See Learning curve
Jalote, Pankaj, 77
Johnson, Philip, 180
Jones, C. L., 122
Jones, Capers, 138n
Justifying peer reviews, 6-8
Key practices of peer reviews, 190
Key process areas (KPAs), 188-190
Knight, John C., 59
Knuth, Donald, 8
KPAs (key process areas), 188-190
Large size
of review teams, 29, 182
of work products, 58, 63, 175-176
Lawrence, Brian, 102
Leakage, of defects, 115, 127-128, 173
Learning curve, 146, 147, 148, 157, 161
Lessons Learned questionnaire, inspection, 115, 116, 150
Line numbers, 69, 75-76
Lint, 63
Listening, active, 104
Litton Data Systems, 7
Location, of defects, 107-108
Locations, reviewers in different, 178
Lockheed Martin Western Development Labs, 12
Lockwood, Lucy A. D., 92
Long-distance reviews, 178-179
Maintainer
participation in reviews, 71
review benefits for, 24
Major defects, 41, 109-110, 117-118, 121, 123, 129, 131, 133, 168, 171-172
Management and managers
as authors, 74
commitment to reviews, 13, 17-18, 22, 147-148, 160, 191
culture and, 17-20
issue logs and, 115
misuse of data, 18-20, 73, 127-128, 173-174
participation in reviews, 54, 66, 73-74, 163, 173, 182
problems and, 165, 172-174
as process owners, 143
respect between authors and, 73
review benefits for, 24
review policies and, 147, 163, 173
successful peer reviews and, 164
training, 155-156
work product appraisals and, 173
Material, selecting for inspection, 66-67
Maturity models, 187-197
Measurement and Analysis, 190, 192
Measurement dysfunction, 19, 128
Measurements. See Metrics
Measuring impact of inspections, 138-142
Meeting time, 130
estimating, 78
Meetings
challenges to holding, 177-181
closing, 114-115
duration, 29-30
late arrivals to, 182
need for, 54-55
problems with, 110-113
suspending, 112
synergy during, 34, 54-55, 180
terminating, 101, 170, 173
Meetings, types of
asynchronous review, 180-181
deposition, 55
distributed review, 178-180
face-to-face, 41, 178, 180
inspection, 53-55, 57, 58, 78, 95-116
overview, 52-53, 74, 78
Methods, review, 41-43
Metrics
data analysis and, 127-129, 135-136, 174
electronic collection of, 78
follow-up and, 119, 121
Goal-Question-Metric (GQM) and, 126
improving development process and, 126
improving inspection process and, 115
inspection summary report and, 54
inspection, 34, 54, 55, 57, 77, 100, 106, 116, 119, 121, 126, 127-129, 132-134, 150
inspectors and, 106
misuse of, 20, 173
peer deskchecks and, 39
peer review coordinators and, 151
process description and, 150
return on investment and, 55
scatter charts, 135, 136
tracking, 77, 115
walkthroughs and, 36
Microsoft, 40, 131
Milestones vs. tasks, 28
Minor defects, 41, 109-110, 118, 121, 123, 129, 131, 133, 171-172
Missing requirements, 91
Models, analysis, 91
Moderator, inspection
analysis strategies and, 87, 169
certification of, 155
characteristics of, 65
checklist, 33, 96-98, 150, 199
cultural issues and, 167
deposition meetings and, 55
distributed reviews and, 179
follow-up and, 56
inspection meetings and, 52, 95-103, 110-113
large groups and, 49, 182
overview and, 52, 82
peer deskchecks and, 39
planning and, 52, 61, 62
preparation and, 85-86, 169
problem-solving and, 164
problems and, 110-113
rework and, 55
role of, 29, 34, 35, 46, 49, 52-54, 64-66, 95-103, 110-113
scheduling events and, 78
selecting, 66, 167
summary report and, 98-100
training, 155
Myers, E. Ann, 59
N-fold inspections, 49, 182
NAH (not applicable here) syndrome, 21
NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), 90
National Software Quality Experiment, 86, 142
Negative and positive aspects of reviews, 15-16, 19-20
Nielsen, Jakob, 92
Nonprocedural code, inspecting, 181
Nortel Networks, 67, 139
Not applicable here (NAH) syndrome, 21
Number of inspectors, 29, 48-49
Numbering lines, 75-76
Observers, 74, 163
O'Neill, Don, 140, 146
Open cultural paradigm, 22, 23
Origin classifications, defect, 108
Orthogonal defect classification, 109
Overview, 52-53, 57, 58, 78, 81-83, 149, 150, 182
distributing inspection package at, 82
meeting, 52-53, 74, 78, 81-83
Owner, peer review process, 27, 143-144, 145, 149, 157, 170, 174, 191
Package, inspection. See Inspection package
Pain, as motivation for change, 146
Pair programming, 38-39, 183
Pair reviewing. See Peer deskcheck
Paradigms, cultural, 22
Paraphrasing, 104
Pareto analysis, 121
Parnas, D. L., 92
Participants, review, 69-74, 110-111, 162, 163, 169, 182
Passaround, 40-41, 42, 53, 55, 149, 161, 165, 175, 176, 180, 182
PBR (Perspective-based reading), 90
PDF (Portable Document Format), 76, 149
Peer deskcheck, 22, 35, 39-40, 66, 117, 149, 165, 171, 175, 183
Peer review
coordinator, 20, 22, 115, 121, 151-152, 164, 166, 174, 191
formality spectrum, 31-41
policy, 147, 165, 173, 191
process description, 143, 149-151
process owner, 27, 143-144, 145, 149, 157, 170, 174, 191
program, installing, 143-157
sophistication scale, 26-27
Perfectionism, 15, 172
Personal Software Process, 39
Personality conflicts, 69, 167
Perspective-based reading (PBR), 90
Perspectives, inspector, 52, 70-73
Phantom Inspector, 34
Phased inspections, 59
Philips Semiconductors, 177
Piloting, of review process, 144, 156-157
Planning, inspection, 27-29, 51-52, 61-79, 167-169
Policy, peer review, 147, 165, 173, 191
Portable Document Format (PDF), 76, 149
Porter, Adam A., 91
Practitioner support, 148
Predecessor documents, 72, 75, 83, 87
Preliminary reviews, 19, 172
Preparation, 83-94
approaches, 86-94
authors and, 86
Capability Maturity Model, Integrated (CMMI-SE/SW) and, 196
code and, 92-94
defect checklists and, 53, 87-88
designs and, 92
culture and, 102
effectiveness and, 101
formal reviews and, 30
Gilb/Graham method and, 57
High-Impact(TM) Inspections and, 58
inspection package and, 52
inspection process and, 51, 53
inspections and, 34, 79, 94
inspectors and, 84, 85
judging adequacy of, 53, 101-102, 152
lack of, 101, 152
moderators and, 85-86, 169
problems, 152, 169-170
rates, 86, 123, 126, 134, 135, 136, 137, 172
requirements specifications and, 87
rules and, 87, 196
times, 83-84, 85-86, 101, 128
typo lists, 85-86
user interfaces and, 92
verification and, 87
Prerequisites for successful reviews, 16
Primark Investment Management Services, 7
Principles, review, 29-30
Privacy of data, 128
Problems
finding vs. solving, 29, 101, 112, 164, 170
troubleshooting review, 164-174
Problems, types of
communication, 177, 178
cultural, 164, 165-167, 177-178
data, 173-174
defects, 170-172
effectiveness, 169-172
geographical, 177
inspection meeting, 110-113
management, 172-174
planning, 167-169
preparation, 152, 169-170
review, 164, 165-174
rework, 172
time, 178, 180, 182
Procedures, review, 149-150
Process, review, 13-30, 115, 149-151, 156-157, 162-163, 199
Process areas, CMMI-SE/SW, 194, 195
Process assets, xii, 149-151
Process brainstorming stage, 56
Process documentation
Capability Maturity Model for Software (SW-CMM) and, 190
contents for peer reviews, 147, 149-151
review participants, 71
review traps and, 162
Process improvement
based on inspection results, 4, 121-123, 162
of inspections, 115
models, 187-197
Process owner, peer review, 27, 143-144, 145, 149, 157, 170, 174, 191
responsibilities, 145
Process stages, inspection, 51-56
Programmer, participation in reviews, 71
Project manager
participation in reviews, 71
review benefits for, 24
Project plans
incorporating reviews into, 27-29, 160, 167
review participants, 71
Project reviews, types of, 2
Project roles, 70-72, 163, 182
Psychology of Computer Programming, The (Weinberg), 14
Qualified reviewers, lack of, 183
Quality, 1-12, 15-16, 185, 186
combining types of reviews and, 42
cost of, 3-6, 159
“good enough,” 5-6
guiding review principles and, 29
inspections and, 62
“is free,” 3-4
Quality (cont.)
National Software Quality Experiment, 142
pair programming and, 39
quantifying, 57
tools for, 8-11, 171
Quality assurance, 61
Quality assurance manager
participation in reviews, 71
review benefits for, 24
Quality attributes, 91, 93
Quantifying product quality, 57
Questions
at beginning of inspection meeting, 101
checklists and, 88
Goal-Question-Metric (GQM) and, 126
prior to inspection meeting, 86
scenarios and, 90
Random cultural paradigm, 22, 23
Rates
inspection, 30, 52, 57, 76-78, 123, 126, 133-134, 136
preparation, 86, 123, 126, 134, 135, 136, 137, 172
Raytheon Electronic Systems, 4
Reader, 34, 35, 39, 46, 47-48, 49, 53, 57, 84, 102, 103-105
Reading, during inspection meeting, 47-48
Recorder, 34, 35, 46, 49, 53, 84, 102, 107-110, 108
Records, review, 27-28, 36
Reinspections, 56, 68, 113, 120-121, 123, 172, 196
Requirements analyst
participation in reviews, 71
review benefits for, 25
Requirements specifications
analysis techniques for, 90
customer participation in reviews of, 71, 72, 163-164
inspecting, 63, 72, 87, 126
missing requirements, 91
preparation for, 87
reinspections and, 120-121
review participants, 71, 112, 163-164
usefulness of, 163-164
Resistance, to reviews, 20-25, 165-166
overcoming, 22-25
Resources, 148
Respect
between authors and managers, 73
between authors and reviewers, 16-17
Return on investment (ROI), 6-8, 12, 58, 138, 140-142, 159, 175
Review champion, 161, 164
Review coordinator. See Coordinator, peer review
Review policies, 147, 165, 191
Reviewers
availability of, in choosing review type, 61
lack of qualified, 183
respect between authors and, 16-17
ReviewPro, 78, 180
Reviews
benefits from, 3-8, 23-25, 185-186
testing and, 8-11
types of project, 2
Rework
authors and, 55, 117-119, 120, 121
closure and, 117-119
cost and, 4, 134
data analysis and, 129
Gilb/Graham method and, 57
inspection process and, 51, 53, 54, 55-56
inspection summary report and, 100
issue log and, 84
metrics and, 134
preparing organization for change and, 144
percentage of project effort, 4
planning and, 28, 63, 64
problems with, 172
quality and, 4
scheduling, 167
selecting material based on risk of, 66
verification of, 34, 46, 114
work product appraisal and, 113
Risk assessment, 5, 89
Risk
in inspection meeting delays, 54
as review selection criterion, 41-42
of using inspection data to evaluate individuals, 20
as work product selection criterion, 66-67
ROI (Return on investment), 6-8, 12, 58, 138, 140-142, 159, 175
Rothman, Johanna, 179
Round-robin method, 105, 179
Rules
decision, 113-114
Gilb/Graham method and, 57
preparation and, 87, 170, 196
for work products, 75, 88
Rules of conduct, 110
Sampling, 67, 168, 176
Santayana, George, 121
Scatter charts, 135, 136
Scenarios, use during preparation, 90-91
Scenes of Software Inspections: Video Dramatizations for the Classroom, 155
Scheduling, 41, 78-79, 167-168, 169, 196
SE-CMM (Capability Maturity Model, Systems Engineering), 187, 193-194
Secondary defects, 120
SEI (Software Engineering Institute). See Software Engineering Institute (SEI)
Selected aspect reviews, 59, 148
Selecting
inspection moderators, 66, 167
inspectors, 69-73, 162
portions of work products, 66-67, 86, 87, 168-169, 176
review methods, 31, 32, 41-43
wording, 16-17, 105-106
Severity of defects, 109, 112
Signatures on inspection summary reports, 114-115
Size
data items and, 130
metrics and, 130, 133, 136
of review team, 29, 48-49, 176, 182
of work products, 175-176
Software, Capability Maturity Model for (SW-CMM), xiii, 187-193
Software development, review checkpoints for, 10-11
Software Development Technologies, 78, 180
Software Engineering Institute (SEI), 22, 187
Scenes of Software Inspections: Video Dramatizations for the Classroom, 155
Software Engineering Process Group, 51, 144
Software Inspection (Gilb and Graham), 88
Software quality assurance plan, 61
Software Quality Engineering, 58
Solving problems vs. finding problems, 29, 101, 112, 164, 170
Sophistication scale, peer review, 26-27
Source code. See Code
Source documents, 57, 68
Space Shuttle Onboard Software, 5, 122
SPC (statistical process control), 123, 126, 135-136
Spectrum, peer review formality, 31-32
Spreadsheet, inspection data, xii, 129, 131, 135, 151, 199
Stages, inspection process, 50-56
Standard for Software Reviews (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), 11
Standards, coding, 164
Standards checkers, 164
Starbase Corporation, 90
Start times, meeting, 182
Static analysis of code, 63, 122
Statistical process control (SPC), 123, 126, 135-136
Structured walkthroughs, 35
Study hall approach, 86
Style issues, 106, 164, 172
Success factors, critical, 159-161
Successful peer reviews, 16-17, 22, 148, 159-174, 191
Summary report, inspection, 54, 98-100, 114-115, 121, 150, 151, 199
Suspending meetings, 112
SW-CMM (Capability Maturity Model for Software), xiii, 187-193
Synchronous cultural paradigm, 22, 23
Synergy, 34, 38, 54-55, 180
System technical documentation, review participants, 71
Systems Engineering Capability Maturity Model (SE-CMM), 187, 193-194
Tasks vs. milestones, 28
Taxonomy of bugs, 109
Team reviews, 15-25, 35, 36, 40, 161, 175
Team size, inspection, 29, 48-49, 176, 182
Teleconference reviews, 179
Templates, 68, 87, 91, 164
Test documentation, 75, 93
review participants, 71
Testability, 87, 90
Test engineer
participation in reviews, 71
requirements specification inspection and, 110
review benefits for, 25
Testing, 20-21, 63-64, 122
reviews and, 8-11
Third-hour discussions, 122
Time
allocation of, 61, 78-79, 160, 191
data items and, 130-131
estimating, 28-29, 78
follow-up, 121
inspection meetings and, 112
limiting discussion, 29-30, 79, 112
metrics and, 132-133, 135, 136
overviews and, 82
peer review coordinators and, 151
planning and, 27
preparation, 83-84, 85-86, 101, 128
problems, 178, 180, 182
return on investment (ROI) and, 141, 142
rework and, 121
scheduling and, 78-79, 170
selecting review process and, 32
successful reviews and, 16
Time to market, 5-6
Tools
for asynchronous reviews, 41, 180
audio- and videoconferencing, 178, 179
Automated Requirement Measurement (ARM), 90
benefits of reviews vs., 9
for code, 8-9, 63, 93, 164, 200
for counting code, 129
Internet-based collaboration, 179
quality, 8-11, 171
for recording, 108
Web links for, 200
Traceability, 89
Training, 148, 152-156
authors, 171
Capability Maturity Model, Integrated (CMMI-SE/SW) and, 196
Capability Maturity Model for Software (SW-CMM) and, 191, 192
cost of, 142
course outline for, 153-154
cultural issues and, 165, 166
data and, 126
inspectors, 146, 155, 183
managers, 155-156
moderators, 155, 167
planning issues and, 169
qualified reviewers, 183
resistance to reviews and, 145
sources of, 200
successful peer reviews and, 160, 162
Traps, review, 162-164
Troubleshooting review problems, 164-174
Types
of defects, 108-110, 122
of peer reviews, 11-12, 31-43, 161
of project reviews, 2
Typo list, 75, 84-86, 100, 101, 117, 150, 199
Underutilization of reviews, 20-22
Unit testing, 15, 63-64
Users, as review participants, 71, 71, 72, 163-164
User interface, analysis techniques for, 92
User interface design, review participants, 71
User manuals, review participants, 71
Validation, 8
Value of reviews, 20
Verification
Capability Maturity Model, Integrated (CMMI-SE/SW) and, 194, 195, 196, 197
Capability Maturity Model, Systems Engineering (SE-CMM) and, 194
Capability Maturity Model for Software (SW-CMM) and, 190, 192-193
follow-up and, 34, 56, 114, 119-121
inspection summary report and, 100
inspections and, 72
issue log and, 108
preparation and, 87
procedures and, 149
Verification (cont.)
quality control and, 8
of rework, 56, 119-120
successful programs and, 148
work product appraisal and, 113
Verifier, 46, 56, 100, 115, 119, 121, 172
Verifying Implementation, 190, 192-193
Version identifiers, 68
Videoconferencing, 178, 179
Videotape, Scenes of Software Inspections: Video Dramatizations for the Classroom, 155
“Virtual” reviewing, 41
Votta, Lawrence G., Jr., 91
Walkthroughs, 3, 31, 35, 36-38, 46, 47, 53, 149, 151, 161, 182
Web sites, xii, 199
Weinberg, Gerald, 110
The Psychology of Computer Programming, 14
Weiss, D. M., 92
Western Development Labs, Lockheed Martin, 12
Wording, choosing, 16-17, 105-106
Work aids for peer reviews, 75, 149, 199
Work products
appraisals of, 34, 53-54, 56, 100, 113-114, 120, 131, 168
examining, 81-94
large, 58, 63, 175-176
of managers, 74
reading, 103-105
rules for, 75, 88
selecting portions to inspect, 66-67, 86, 87, 168-169, 176
size of, in choosing review type, 61
types to review, 11-12
version identifiers for, 68
Yield. See Effectiveness, inspection
Yourdon, Edward, 35

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