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Connecting Networks Companion Guide

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About

Features

• Portable, desk reference for take-home study and reference anytime, anywhere.
• Aligns to the online course chapters. Provides students with the only authorized, full-featured textbook for the Cisco Networking Academy course
• Book-based pedagogy that serves as additional reinforcement in helping the student learn the topics covered in the course.

Description

  • Copyright 2014
  • Dimensions: 8" x 9-1/8"
  • Pages: 576
  • Edition: 1st
  • Book
  • ISBN-10: 1-58713-332-6
  • ISBN-13: 978-1-58713-332-9

Connecting Networks Companion Guide is the official supplemental textbook for the Connecting Networks course in the Cisco® Networking Academy® CCNA® Routing and Switching curriculum.

This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course allows you to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. You will learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. You will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network.

The Companion Guide is designed as a portable desk reference to use anytime, anywhere to reinforce the material from the course and organize your time.

The book’s features help you focus on important concepts to succeed in this course:

  • Chapter objectives–Review core concepts by answering the focus questions listed at the beginning of each chapter.
  • Key terms–Refer to the lists of networking vocabulary introduced and highlighted in context in each chapter. 
  • Glossary–Consult the comprehensive Glossary with 195 terms. 
  • Summary of Activities and Labs–Maximize your study time with this complete list of all associated practice exercises at the end of each chapter. 
  • Check Your Understanding–Evaluate your readiness with the end-of-chapter questions that match the style of questions you see in the online course quizzes. The answer key explains each answer.
  • How To–Look for this icon to study the steps you need to learn to perform certain tasks.
  • Interactive Activities–Reinforce your understanding of topics with all the different exercises from the online course identified throughout the book with this icon.
  • Videos–Watch the videos embedded within the online course.
  • Packet Tracer Activities–Explore and visualize networking concepts using Packet Tracer exercises interspersed throughout the chapters.
  • Hands-on Labs–Work through all the course labs and Class Activities that are included in the course and published in the separate Lab Manual.

Downloads

Downloads

Please download chapters 1-3 associated with Connecting Networks Companion Guide here Chapter 1.

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Sample Content

Online Sample Chapters

Cisco Networking Academy Connecting Networks Companion Guide: Connecting to the WAN

Cisco Networking Academy Connecting Networks Companion Guide: Hierarchical Network Design

Cisco Networking Academy Connecting Networks Companion Guide: Point-to-Point Connections

Sample Pages

Download the sample pages (includes Chapters 1-3 and Index)

Table of Contents

    Introduction xix

Chapter 1: Hierarchical Network Designs 1

    Objectives 1

    Key Terms 1

    Introduction (1.0.1.1) 2

    Hierarchical Network Design Overview (1.1) 2

        Enterprise Network Campus Design (1.1.1) 2

            Network Requirements (1.1.1.1) 3

            Structured Engineering Principles (1.1.1.2) 4

        Hierarchical Network Design (1.1.2) 4

            Network Hierarchy (1.1.2.1) 4

            The Access Layer (1.1.2.2) 6

        The Distribution Layer (1.1.2.3) 7

        The Core Layer (1.1.2.4) 9

            Two-Tier Collapsed Core Design (1.1.2.5) 10

    Cisco Enterprise Architecture (1.2) 10

        Modular Design (1.2.1.1) 11

        Modules in the Enterprise Architecture (1.2.1.2) 12

    Cisco Enterprise Architecture Model (1.2.2) 14

        Cisco Enterprise Architecture Model (1.2.2.1) 14

        Cisco Enterprise Campus (1.2.2.2) 15

        Cisco Enterprise Edge (1.2.2.3) 17

        Service Provider Edge (1.2.2.4) 18

        Remote Functional Area (1.2.2.5) 21

            Enterprise Branch 21

            Enterprise Teleworker 22

            Enterprise Data Center 22

    Evolving Network Architectures (1.3) 22

        IT Challenges (1.3.1.1) 22

        Emerging Enterprise Architectures (1.3.1.2) 23

    Emerging Network Architectures (1.3.2) 24

        Cisco Borderless Networks (1.3.2.1) 24

        Collaboration Architecture (1.3.2.2) 25

        Data Center and Virtualization (1.3.2.3) 26

        Expanding the Network (1.3.2.4) 27

    Summary (1.4) 29

    Practice 30

        Class Activities 30

        Packet Tracer Activities 30

    Check Your Understanding Questions 31

Chapter 2: Connecting the WAN 35

    Objectives 35

    Key Terms 35

    Introduction (2.0.1.1) 37

    WAN Technologies Overview (2.1) 37

        Why a WAN? (2.1.1.1) 37

        Are WANs Necessary? (2.1.1.2) 38

        Evolving Networks (2.1.1.3) 39

        Small Office (2.1.1.4) 39

        Campus Network (2.1.1.5) 40

        Branch Networks (2.1.1.6) 42

        Distributed Network (2.1.1.7) 43

    WAN Operations (2.1.2) 44

        WANs in the OSI Model (2.1.2.1) 44

        Common WAN Terminology (2.1.2.2) 45

        WAN Devices (2.1.2.3) 47

        Circuit-Switched Networks (2.1.2.4) 48

        Packet-Switched Networks (2.1.2.5) 50

    Selecting a WAN Technology (2.2) 51

        WAN Link Connection Options (2.2.1.1) 51

        Service Provider Network Infrastructure (2.2.1.2) 52

    Private WAN Infrastructures (2.2.2) 54

        Leased Lines (2.2.2.1) 54

        Dialup (2.2.2.2) 55

        ISDN (2.2.2.3) 56

        Frame Relay (2.2.2.4) 58

        ATM (2.2.2.5) 59

        Ethernet WAN (2.2.2.6) 60

        MPLS (2.2.2.7) 62

        VSAT (2.2.2.8) 63

    Public WAN Infrastructure (2.2.3) 64

        DSL (2.2.3.1) 64

        Cable (2.2.3.2) 65

        Wireless (2.2.3.3) 66

        3G/4G Cellular (2.2.3.4) 67

        VPN Technology (2.2.3.5) 68

    Selecting WAN Services (2.2.4) 70

        Choosing a WAN Link Connection (2.2.4.1, 2.2.4.2) 70

            What Is the Purpose of the WAN? 70

            What Is the Geographic Scope? 70

            What Are the Traffic Requirements? 71

    Summary (2.3) 73

    Practice 74

        Class Activities 74

        Labs 74

    Check Your Understanding Questions 74

Chapter 3: Point-to-Point Connections 79

    Objectives 79

    Key Terms 79

    Introduction (3.0.1.1) 80

    Serial Point-to-Point Overview (3.1) 80

        Serial Communications (3.1.1) 81

            Serial and Parallel Ports (3.1.1.1) 81

            Serial Communication (3.1.1.2) 82

            Point-to-Point Communication Links (3.1.1.3) 84

            Time-Division Multiplexing (3.1.1.4) 85

            Statistical Time-Division Multiplexing (3.1.1.5) 86

            TDM Examples — Sonet and SDM (3.1.1.6) 87

            Demarcation Point (3.1.1.7) 88

            DTE-DCE (3.1.1.8) 90

            Serial Cables (3.1.1.9) 91

            Serial Bandwidth (3.1.1.10) 94

        HDLC Encapsulation (3.1.2) 96

            WAN Encapsulation Protocols (3.1.2.1) 96

            HDLC Encapsulation (3.1.2.2) 97

            HDLC Frame Types (3.1.2.3) 98

            Configuring HDLC Encapsulation (3.1.2.4) 100

            Troubleshooting a Serial Interface (3.1.2.5) 100

    PPP Operation (3.2) 104

        Benefits of PPP (3.2.1) 104

            Introducing PPP (3.2.1.1) 104

            Advantages of PPP (3.2.1.2) 106

        LCP and NCP (3.2.2) 106

            PPP Layered Architecture (3.2.2.1) 106

            PPP — Link Control Protocol (LCP) (3.2.2.2) 107

            PPP — Network Control Protocol (NCP) (3.2.2.3) 108

            PPP Frame Structure (3.2.2.4) 108

        PPP Sessions (3.2.3) 109

            Establishing a PPP Session (3.2.3.1) 110

            LCP Operation (3.2.3.2) 111

            LCP Packet (3.2.3.3) 113

            PPP Configuration Options (3.2.3.4) 115

            NCP Explained (3.2.3.5) 117

    Configure PPP (3.3) 118

        Configure PPP (3.3.1) 118

            PPP Configuration Options (3.3.1.1) 119

            PPP Basic Configuration Command (3.3.1.2) 120

            PPP Compression Commands (3.3.1.3) 121

            PPP Link Quality Monitoring Command (3.3.1.4) 122

            PPP Multilink Commands (3.3.1.5) 123

            Verifying PPP Configuration (3.3.1.6) 125

        PPP Authentication (3.3.2) 126

            PPP Authentication Protocols (3.3.2.1) 127

            Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) (3.3.2.2) 127

            Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) (3.3.2.3) 129

            PPP Encapsulation and Authentication Process (3.3.2.4) 131

            Configuring PPP Authentication (3.3.2.5) 134

            Configuring PPP with Authentication (3.3.2.6) 136

    Troubleshoot WAN Connectivity (3.4) 138

        Troubleshoot PPP (3.4.1) 138

            Troubleshooting PPP Serial Encapsulation (3.4.1.1) 138

            Debug PPP (3.4.1.2) 140

            Troubleshooting a PPP Configuration with Authentication (3.4.1.3) 142

    Summary (3.5) 145

    Practice 146

        Class Activities 146

        Labs 146

        Packet Tracer Activities 146

    Check Your Understanding Questions 147

Chapter 4: Frame Relay 153

    Objectives 153

    Key Terms 153

    Introduction (4.0.1.1) 154

    Introduction to Frame Relay (4.1) 154

        Benefits of Frame Relay (4.1.1) 155

            Introducing Frame Relay (4.1.1.1) 155

            Benefits of Frame Relay WAN Technology (4.1.1.2) 156

            Dedicated Line Requirements (4.1.1.3) 157

            Cost-Effectiveness and Flexibility of Frame Relay (4.1.1.4) 159

        Frame Relay Operation (4.1.2) 160

            Virtual Circuits (4.1.2.1) 160

            Multiple Virtual Circuits (4.1.2.2) 163

            Frame Relay Encapsulation (4.1.2.3) 165

            Frame Relay Topologies (4.1.2.4, 4.1.2.5) 167

            Frame Relay Address Mapping (4.1.2.6) 171

            Local Management Interface (LMI) (4.1.2.7) 174

            LMI Extensions (4.1.2.8) 175

            Using LMI and Inverse ARP to Map Addresses (4.1.2.9) 178

        Advanced Frame Relay Concepts (4.1.3) 180

            Access Rate and Committed Information Rate (4.1.3.1) 180

            Frame Relay Example (4.1.3.2) 181

            Bursting (4.1.3.3) 183

            Frame Relay Flow Control (4.1.3.4) 184

    Configure Frame Relay (4.2) 187

        Configure Basic Frame Relay (4.2.1) 187

            Basic Frame Relay Configuration Commands (4.2.1.1) 187

            Configuring a Static Frame Relay Map (4.2.1.2) 190

            Verify a Static Frame Relay Map (4.2.1.3) 192

        Configure Subinterfaces (4.2.2) 193

            Reachability Issues (4.2.2.1) 193

            Solving Reachability Issues (4.2.2.2) 196

            Configuring Point-to-Point Subinterfaces (4.2.2.3) 199

            Example: Configuring Point-to-Point Subinterfaces (4.2.2.4) 200

    Troubleshoot Connectivity (4.3) 203

        Troubleshoot Frame Relay (4.3.1) 203

            Verifying Frame Relay Operation: Frame Relay Interface (4.3.1.1) 203

            Verifying Frame Relay Operation: LMI Operations (4.3.1.2) 204

            Verifying Frame Relay Operation: PVC Status (4.3.1.3) 205

            Verifying Frame Relay Operation: Inverse ARP (4.3.1.4) 205

            Troubleshooting Frame Relay Operation (4.3.1.5) 207

    Summary (4.4) 209

    Practice 210

        Class Activities 210

        Labs 210

        Packet Tracer Activities 210

    Check Your Understanding Questions 211

Chapter 5: Network Address Translation for IPv4 217

    Objectives 217

    Key Terms 217

    Introduction (5.0.1.1) 218

    NAT Operation (5.1) 219

        NAT Characteristics (5.1.1) 219

            IPv4 Private Address Space (5.1.1.1) 219

            What Is NAT? (5.1.1.2) 220

            NAT Terminology (5.1.1.3) 221

            How NAT Works (5.1.1.5) 224

        Types of NAT (5.1.2) 225

            Static NAT (5.1.2.1) 225

            Dynamic NAT (5.1.2.2) 226

            Port Address Translation (PAT) (5.1.2.3) 227

            Next Available Port (5.1.2.4) 228

            Comparing NAT and PAT (5.1.2.5) 230

    Benefits of NAT (5.1.3) 231

            Benefits of NAT (5.1.3.1) 231

            Disadvantages of NAT (5.1.3.2) 232

    Configuring NAT (5.2) 233

        Configuring Static NAT (5.2.1) 233

            Configuring Static NAT (5.2.1.1) 233

            Analyzing Static NAT (5.2.1.2) 235

            Verifying Static NAT (5.2.1.3) 237

        Configuring Dynamic NAT (5.2.2) 238

            Dynamic NAT Operation (5.2.2.1) 238

            Configuring Dynamic NAT (5.2.2.2) 239

            Analyzing Dynamic NAT (5.2.2.3) 242

            Verifying Dynamic NAT (5.2.2.4) 244

        Configuring Port Address Translation (PAT) (5.2.3) 247

            Configuring PAT: Address Pool (5.2.3.1) 247

            Configuring PAT: Single Address (5.2.3.2) 249

            Analyzing PAT (5.2.3.3) 251

            Verifying PAT (5.2.3.4) 253

        Port Forwarding (5.2.4) 255

            Port Forwarding (5.2.4.1) 255

            SOHO Example (5.2.4.2) 257

            Configuring Port Forwarding with IOS (5.2.4.3) 258

        Configuring NAT and IPv6 (5.2.5) 260

            NAT for IPv6? (5.2.5.1) 260

            IPv6 Unique Local Addresses (5.2.5.2) 262

            NAT for IPv6 (5.2.5.3) 263

    Troubleshooting NAT (5.3) 264

            Troubleshooting NAT: show Commands (5.3.1.1) 264

            Troubleshooting NAT: debug Command (5.3.1.2) 266

            Case Study (5.3.1.3) 268

    Summary (5.4) 271

    Practice 272

        Class Activities 272

        Labs 272

        Packet Tracer Activities 272

    Check Your Understanding Questions 273

Chapter 6: Broadband Solutions 279

    Objectives 279

    Key Terms 279

    Introduction (6.0.1.1) 280

    Teleworking (6.1) 280

        Benefits of Teleworking (6.1.1) 280

            Introducing Teleworking (6.1.1.1) 281

            Employer Benefits of Teleworking (6.1.1.2) 281

            Community and Government Benefits (6.1.1.3) 282

            Individual Benefits of Teleworking (6.1.1.4) 283

            Detriments to Telework (6.1.1.5) 283

        Business Requirements for Teleworker Services (6.1.2) 284

            Teleworker Solution (6.1.2.1) 284

        Teleworker Connectivity Requirements (6.1.2.2) 286

    Comparing Broadband Solutions (6.2) 287

        Cable (6.2.1) 287

            What is a Cable System? (6.2.1.1) 287

            Cable and the Electromagnetic Spectrum (6.2.1.2) 289

            DOCSIS (6.2.1.3) 290

            Cable Components (6.2.1.4) 291

        DSL (6.2.2) 293

            What is DSL? (6.2.2.1) 293

            DSL Connections (6.2.2.2) 294

            Separating Voice and Data in ADSL (6.2.2.3) 295

    Broadband Wireless (6.2.3) 298

            Types of Broadband Wireless Technologies (6.2.3.1, 6.2.3.2) 298

        Selecting Broadband Solutions (6.2.4) 303

            Comparing Broadband Solutions (6.2.4.1) 303

    Configuring xDSL Connectivity (6.3) 304

        PPPoE Overview (6.3.1) 304

            PPPoE Motivation (6.3.1.1) 304

            PPPoE Concepts (6.3.1.2) 306

        Configuring PPPoE (6.3.2) 306

            PPPoE Configuration (6.3.2.1) 307

    Summary (6.4) 309

    Practice 310

        Class Activities 310

        Labs 310

    Check Your Understanding Questions 310

Chapter 7: Securing Site-to-Site Connectivity 313

    Objectives 313

    Key Terms 313

    Introduction (7.0.1.1) 314

    VPNs (7.1) 314

        Fundamentals of VPNs (7.1.1) 314

            Introducing VPNs (7.1.1.1) 315

            Benefits of VPNs (7.1.1.2) 316

        Types of VPNs (7.1.2) 317

            Remote-Access VPNs (7.1.2.2) 318

    Site-to-Site GRE Tunnels (7.2) 319

        Fundamentals of Generic Routing Encapsulation (7.2.1) 319

            Introduction to GRE (7.2.1.1) 319

            Characteristics of GRE (7.2.1.2) 320

            Configuring GRE Tunnels (7.2.2) 321

            GRE Tunnel Configuration (7.2.2.1) 322

            GRE Tunnel Verification (7.2.2.2) 324

    Introducing IPsec (7.3) 326

        Internet Protocol Security (7.3.1) 326

            IPsec (7.3.1.1) 326

            IPsec Security Services (7.3.1.2) 327

        IPsec Framework (7.3.2) 328

            Confidentiality with Encryption (7.3.2.1) 328

            Encryption Algorithms (7.3.2.2) 330

            Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange (7.3.2.3) 332

            Integrity with Hash Algorithms (7.3.2.4) 332

            IPsec Authentication (7.3.2.5) 334

            IPsec Protocol Framework (7.3.2.6) 335

    Remote Access (7.4) 337

        Remote-Access VPN Solutions (7.4.1) 337

            Types of Remote-Access VPNs (7.4.1.1) 337

            Cisco SSL VPN (7.4.1.2) 338

            Cisco SSL VPN Solutions (7.4.1.3) 340

        IPsec Remote-Access VPNs (7.4.2) 341

            IPsec Remote Access (7.4.2.1) 341

            Cisco Easy VPN Server and Remote (7.4.2.2) 342

            Cisco Easy VPN Client (7.4.2.3) 343

            Comparing IPsec and SSL (7.4.2.4) 345

    Summary (7.5) 347

    Practice 348

        Class Activities 348

        Labs 348

        Packet Tracer Activities 348

    Check Your Understanding Questions 348

Chapter 8: Monitoring the Network 351

    Objectives 351

    Key Terms 351

    Introduction (8.0.1.1) 352

    Syslog (8.1) 352

        Syslog Operation (8.1.1) 352

            Introduction to Syslog (8.1.1.1) 352

            Syslog Operation (8.1.1.2) 354

            Syslog Message Format (8.1.1.3) 355

            Service Timestamp (8.1.1.4) 357

        Configuring Syslog (8.1.2) 358

            Syslog Server (8.1.2.1) 358

            Default Logging (8.1.2.2) 359

            Router and Switch Commands for Syslog Clients (8.1.2.3) 360

            Verifying Syslog (8.1.2.4) 362

    SNMP (8.2) 364

        SNMP Operation (8.2.1) 364

            Introduction to SNMP (8.2.1.1) 364

            SNMP Operation (8.2.1.2) 365

            SNMP Agent Traps (8.2.1.3) 366

            SNMP Versions (8.2.1.4) 368

            Community Strings (8.2.1.5) 370

            Management Information Base Object ID (8.2.1.6) 371

        Configuring SNMP (8.2.2) 374

            Steps for Configuring SNMP (8.2.2.1) 374

            Verifying SNMP Configuration (8.2.2.2) 375

            Security Best Practices (8.2.2.3) 378

    NetFlow (8.3) 380

        NetFlow Operation (8.3.1) 380

            Introducing NetFlow (8.3.1.1) 380

            Understanding NetFlow (8.3.1.2) 381

            Network Flows (8.3.1.3) 383

        Configuring NetFlow (8.3.2) 384

            Verifying NetFlow (8.3.2.2) 386

        Examining Traffic Patterns (8.3.3) 390

            Identifying NetFlow Collector Functions (8.3.3.1) 390

            NetFlow Analysis with a NetFlow Collector (8.3.3.2) 392

    Summary (8.4) 397

    Practice 397

        Class Activities 398

        Labs 398

        Packet Tracer Activities 398

    Check Your Understanding Questions 398

Chapter 9: Troubleshooting the Network 401

    Objectives 401

    Key Terms 401

    Introduction (9.0.1.1) 402

    Troubleshooting with a Systematic Approach (9.1) 402

        Network Documentation (9.1.1) 402

            Documenting the Network (9.1.1.1) 403

            Network Topology Diagrams (9.1.1.2) 406

            Network Baseline Performance Level (9.1.1.3) 408

            Establishing a Network Baseline (9.1.1.4) 409

            Measuring Data (9.1.1.5) 412

        Troubleshooting Process (9.1.2) 415

            General Troubleshooting Procedures (9.1.2.1) 415

            Gathering Symptoms (9.1.2.2) 417

            Questioning End Users (9.1.2.3) 418

        Isolating the Issue Using Layered Models (9.1.3) 419

            Using Layered Models for Troubleshooting (9.1.3.1) 419

            Troubleshooting Methods (9.1.3.2, 9.1.3.3) 422

            Guidelines for Selecting a Troubleshooting Method (9.1.3.4) 425

    Network Troubleshooting (9.2) 426

        Troubleshooting Tools (9.2.1) 426

            Software Troubleshooting Tools (9.2.1.1, 9.2.1.2) 426

            Hardware Troubleshooting Tools (9.2.1.3) 431

            Using a Syslog Server for Troubleshooting (9.2.1.4) 435

        Symptoms and Causes of Network Troubleshooting (9.2.2) 437

            Physical Layer Troubleshooting (9.2.2.1) 437

            Data Link Layer Troubleshooting (9.2.2.2) 439

            Network Layer Troubleshooting (9.2.2.3) 441

            Transport Layer Troubleshooting — ACLs (9.2.2.4) 443

            Transport Layer Troubleshooting — NAT for IPv4 (9.2.2.5) 445

            Application Layer Troubleshooting (9.2.2.6) 446

        Troubleshooting IP Connectivity (9.2.3) 448

            Components of Troubleshooting End-to-End Connectivity (9.2.3.1) 448

            End-to-End Connectivity Problem Initiates Troubleshooting (9.2.3.2) 450

            Step 1 - Verify the Physical Layer (9.2.3.3) 452

            Step 2 - Check for Duplex Mismatches (9.2.3.4) 454

            Step 3 - Verify Layer 2 and Layer 3 Addressing on the Local Network (9.2.3.5) 456

            Step 4 - Verify Default Gateway (9.2.3.6) 461

            Step 5 - Verify Correct Path (9.2.3.7) 464

            Step 6 - Verify the Transport Layer (9.2.3.8) 468

            Step 7 - Verify ACLs (9.2.3.9) 469

            Step 8 - Verify DNS (9.2.3.10) 471

    Summary (9.3) 474

    Practice 475

        Class Activities 475

        Packet Tracer Activities 475

    Check Your Understanding Questions 476

Appendix A: Answers to the “Check Your Understanding” Questions 479

Glossary 499

TOC, 9781587133329, 3/25/2014

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For inquiries and questions, we collect the inquiry or question, together with name, contact details (email address, phone number and mailing address) and any other additional information voluntarily submitted to us through a Contact Us form or an email. We use this information to address the inquiry and respond to the question.

Online Store

For orders and purchases placed through our online store on this site, we collect order details, name, institution name and address (if applicable), email address, phone number, shipping and billing addresses, credit/debit card information, shipping options and any instructions. We use this information to complete transactions, fulfill orders, communicate with individuals placing orders or visiting the online store, and for related purposes.

Surveys

Pearson may offer opportunities to provide feedback or participate in surveys, including surveys evaluating Pearson products, services or sites. Participation is voluntary. Pearson collects information requested in the survey questions and uses the information to evaluate, support, maintain and improve products, services or sites, develop new products and services, conduct educational research and for other purposes specified in the survey.

Contests and Drawings

Occasionally, we may sponsor a contest or drawing. Participation is optional. Pearson collects name, contact information and other information specified on the entry form for the contest or drawing to conduct the contest or drawing. Pearson may collect additional personal information from the winners of a contest or drawing in order to award the prize and for tax reporting purposes, as required by law.

Newsletters

If you have elected to receive email newsletters or promotional mailings and special offers but want to unsubscribe, simply email information@informit.com.

Service Announcements

On rare occasions it is necessary to send out a strictly service related announcement. For instance, if our service is temporarily suspended for maintenance we might send users an email. Generally, users may not opt-out of these communications, though they can deactivate their account information. However, these communications are not promotional in nature.

Customer Service

We communicate with users on a regular basis to provide requested services and in regard to issues relating to their account we reply via email or phone in accordance with the users' wishes when a user submits their information through our Contact Us form.

Other Collection and Use of Information


Application and System Logs

Pearson automatically collects log data to help ensure the delivery, availability and security of this site. Log data may include technical information about how a user or visitor connected to this site, such as browser type, type of computer/device, operating system, internet service provider and IP address. We use this information for support purposes and to monitor the health of the site, identify problems, improve service, detect unauthorized access and fraudulent activity, prevent and respond to security incidents and appropriately scale computing resources.

Web Analytics

Pearson may use third party web trend analytical services, including Google Analytics, to collect visitor information, such as IP addresses, browser types, referring pages, pages visited and time spent on a particular site. While these analytical services collect and report information on an anonymous basis, they may use cookies to gather web trend information. The information gathered may enable Pearson (but not the third party web trend services) to link information with application and system log data. Pearson uses this information for system administration and to identify problems, improve service, detect unauthorized access and fraudulent activity, prevent and respond to security incidents, appropriately scale computing resources and otherwise support and deliver this site and its services.

Cookies and Related Technologies

This site uses cookies and similar technologies to personalize content, measure traffic patterns, control security, track use and access of information on this site, and provide interest-based messages and advertising. Users can manage and block the use of cookies through their browser. Disabling or blocking certain cookies may limit the functionality of this site.

Do Not Track

This site currently does not respond to Do Not Track signals.

Security


Pearson uses appropriate physical, administrative and technical security measures to protect personal information from unauthorized access, use and disclosure.

Children


This site is not directed to children under the age of 13.

Marketing


Pearson may send or direct marketing communications to users, provided that

  • Pearson will not use personal information collected or processed as a K-12 school service provider for the purpose of directed or targeted advertising.
  • Such marketing is consistent with applicable law and Pearson's legal obligations.
  • Pearson will not knowingly direct or send marketing communications to an individual who has expressed a preference not to receive marketing.
  • Where required by applicable law, express or implied consent to marketing exists and has not been withdrawn.

Pearson may provide personal information to a third party service provider on a restricted basis to provide marketing solely on behalf of Pearson or an affiliate or customer for whom Pearson is a service provider. Marketing preferences may be changed at any time.

Correcting/Updating Personal Information


If a user's personally identifiable information changes (such as your postal address or email address), we provide a way to correct or update that user's personal data provided to us. This can be done on the Account page. If a user no longer desires our service and desires to delete his or her account, please contact us at customer-service@informit.com and we will process the deletion of a user's account.

Choice/Opt-out


Users can always make an informed choice as to whether they should proceed with certain services offered by InformIT. If you choose to remove yourself from our mailing list(s) simply visit the following page and uncheck any communication you no longer want to receive: www.informit.com/u.aspx.

Sale of Personal Information


Pearson does not rent or sell personal information in exchange for any payment of money.

While Pearson does not sell personal information, as defined in Nevada law, Nevada residents may email a request for no sale of their personal information to NevadaDesignatedRequest@pearson.com.

Supplemental Privacy Statement for California Residents


California residents should read our Supplemental privacy statement for California residents in conjunction with this Privacy Notice. The Supplemental privacy statement for California residents explains Pearson's commitment to comply with California law and applies to personal information of California residents collected in connection with this site and the Services.

Sharing and Disclosure


Pearson may disclose personal information, as follows:

  • As required by law.
  • With the consent of the individual (or their parent, if the individual is a minor)
  • In response to a subpoena, court order or legal process, to the extent permitted or required by law
  • To protect the security and safety of individuals, data, assets and systems, consistent with applicable law
  • In connection the sale, joint venture or other transfer of some or all of its company or assets, subject to the provisions of this Privacy Notice
  • To investigate or address actual or suspected fraud or other illegal activities
  • To exercise its legal rights, including enforcement of the Terms of Use for this site or another contract
  • To affiliated Pearson companies and other companies and organizations who perform work for Pearson and are obligated to protect the privacy of personal information consistent with this Privacy Notice
  • To a school, organization, company or government agency, where Pearson collects or processes the personal information in a school setting or on behalf of such organization, company or government agency.

Links


This web site contains links to other sites. Please be aware that we are not responsible for the privacy practices of such other sites. We encourage our users to be aware when they leave our site and to read the privacy statements of each and every web site that collects Personal Information. This privacy statement applies solely to information collected by this web site.

Requests and Contact


Please contact us about this Privacy Notice or if you have any requests or questions relating to the privacy of your personal information.

Changes to this Privacy Notice


We may revise this Privacy Notice through an updated posting. We will identify the effective date of the revision in the posting. Often, updates are made to provide greater clarity or to comply with changes in regulatory requirements. If the updates involve material changes to the collection, protection, use or disclosure of Personal Information, Pearson will provide notice of the change through a conspicuous notice on this site or other appropriate way. Continued use of the site after the effective date of a posted revision evidences acceptance. Please contact us if you have questions or concerns about the Privacy Notice or any objection to any revisions.

Last Update: November 17, 2020