Home > Store

Readings in Electronic Commerce: SPHIGS Software

Register your product to gain access to bonus material or receive a coupon.

Readings in Electronic Commerce: SPHIGS Software

Book

  • Your Price: $47.99
  • List Price: $59.99
  • We're temporarily out of stock, but order now and we'll send it to you later.

Description

  • Copyright 1997
  • Dimensions: 6-1/4" x 9-1/4"
  • Pages: 368
  • Edition: 1st
  • Book
  • ISBN-10: 0-201-88060-1
  • ISBN-13: 978-0-201-88060-1

Electronic commerce offers functionality and new ways of doing business that cannot be ignored. Readings in Electronic Commerce is a collection of research papers addressing issues facing academia and industry in the age of electronic commerce. Experts in the field come together with the goal of helping companies better understand the shape, structure, and operation of business in the coming millennium.

Investments in electronic commerce introduce far-reaching organizational and technological issues. Each of the five parts covers important aspects of the role electronic commerce is playing in the strategy of business, providing value to both external and internal customers. Here is a collection of some of the best thinking from researchers who specialize in the various facets of electronic markets -- namely economics, finance, marketing, production and operations management-- as well as technology experts in the industry who are creating and specializing in the electronic commerce infrastructure.

Highlights
  • Introduces the public policy issues you need to know when making business decisions.
  • Describes the cryptograpic protocols for secure electronic transactions required when a trusted third party is involved.
  • Presents the economic challenges and difficulties in the electronic commerce market.
  • Discusses several network payment models, including NetCheque® and NetCash systems, and shows how the design of a payment system can influence its flexibility.
  • Explores the reasons behind the technical and operational concerns of electronic commerce, and offers solutions to these problems.


0201880601B04062001

Sample Content

Table of Contents



= Preface.


= Acknowledgments.


List of Contributors.


Biographical Sketches of the Authors.

I. INTRODUCTORY OVERVIEW.

 1. An Unaffiliated View of Internet Commerce, David H. Crocker.
 2. Commercial Scenarios for the Web: Opportunities and Challenges, Donna L. Hoffman, Thomas P. Novak, and Patrali Chatterjee.
 3. An Evaluation of the World Wide Web as a Platform for Electronic Commerce, Daniel W. Connolly.

II. GENERAL BUSINESS AND POLICY.

 4. Electronic Commerce: A Washington Perspective, James B. Rapp.
 5. International Encryption Policy, Dorothy E. Denning.
 6. The Essential Role of Trusted Third Parties in Electronic Commerce, A. Michael Froomkin.

III. PRICING AND ELECTRONIC TRANSACTIONS.

 7. Perils and Pitfalls of Practical Internet Commerce: The Lessons of First Virtual's First Year, Nathaniel S. Borenstein, John Ferguson, Gerald Hall, Carlyn Lowery, Richard Mintz, Darren New, Beverly Parenti, Marshall T. Rose, Einar Stefferud, Lee Stein, Carey Storm, Ed Vielmetti, Marc Weiser, and Pierre-R. Wolff.
 8. Economic Issues in Electronic Commerce, Alok Gupta, Dale O. Stahl, and Andrew B. Whinston.
 9. A Flexible Framework for Network Payment, B. Clifford Neuman.

IV. DOUMENT MANAGEMENT AND DIGITAL LIBRARIES.

10. Document Management and Electronic Commerce, Larry Masinter.
11. Smart Catalogs and Virtual Catalogs, Arthur M. Keller.

V. BUSINESS APPLICATIONS.

12. Distributed Decision Support Systems for Real-Time Supply Chain Management Using Agent Technologies, Aimo Hinkkanen, Ravi Kalakota, Porama Saengcharoenrat, Jan Stallaert, and Andrew B. Whinston.
13. Electronic Markets, R. Preston McAfee and John McMillan.
14. Intranets: Looking beyond Internal Corporate Web Servers, Ramnath Chellappa, Anitesh Barua, and Andrew B. Whinston.
15. Electronic Publishing versus Publishing Electronically, Ramnath Chellappa, Anitesh Barua, Jennifer Oetzel, and Andrew B. Whinston.
Index. 0201880601T04062001

Preface

PREFACE

The majority of the chapters in this book are based on papers presented at the Sixth Organizational Computing, Coordination, and Collaboration Conference held at the IC2 Institute in Austin, Texas, in October 1995. The purpose of this conference was to address research issues facing academia and industry in the age of electronic commerce. Experts in the field of electronic commerce came together with the goal of helping companies to better understand the shape, structure, and operation of business in the coming millennium.

As the fastest-growing facet of the Internet, electronic commerce offers functionality and new ways of doing business that no company can afford to ignore. The basis for moving to an electronic commerce is a belief that electronic markets have the potential to be more efficient in developing new information goods and services. In addition, electronic commerce also offers companies new ways of finding global customers and trading partners. The Sixth Organizational Computing, Coordination, and Collaboration Conference was aimed at promoting electronic commerce research and practice. Electronic commerce is expected to make obsolete much of the accumulated research in business and to create and demand radical changes in the process, product, and promotion to better exploit the digital platform.

This emerging electronic marketplace is an uncharted frontier, and, much like the "Wild West" of the past, needs to be tamed. The challenge is simple: using emerging technology, how do we create a business environment or infrastructure that will ensure efficient electronic markets? What does it take in terms of new organizational structures like the network structures facilitated by smart and wireless messaging; new electronic institutions such as brokerages staffed by electronic brokers or agents; new business processes better suited for mass customization, global sourcing, and logistics; and new financial payment mechanisms and mercantile protocols?

To explore and exploit new frontiers, we need to integrate business concerns with the changing technology. This conference sought to provide this integration by bringing together leading business researchers who specialize in the various facets of electronic markets--namely, economics, finance, marketing, production, and operations management--and technology experts in the industry who are creating the electronic commerce infrastructure. In addition, experts who specialize in the WWW browsers, electronic cash, encryption, software agents, MIME-based messaging, EDI, and structured documents made presentations.

It is no longer sufficient for electronic commerce to be viewed as a path-breaking technology. Electronic commerce is already playing a significant role in determining the strategy of today's companies in providing value to external and internal customers. The challenge facing companies is to increase the effectiveness of electronic commerce activities in order to achieve business performance. As successful organizations have taken a process-oriented view of their business, they will have to reevaluate the role of electronic commerce in terms of alignment with corporate goals.

This book is divided into five parts. Part One, an introductory overview of electronic commerce, includes three chapters. The first, "An Unaffiliated View of Electronic Commerce," by David H. Crocker, discusses the reasons that the Internet will serve as the global conveyor of transactions for on-line commerce. It also discusses the nature of the technical and operational concerns of electronic commerce and offers solutions to these problems. Chapter 2 by Donna L. Hoffman, Thomas P. Novak, and Patrali Chatterjee explores three main issues associated with the explosion of commercial activity on the Web. Dr. Hoffman explores the role of the Web as a distribution channel and a medium for marketing communications, the factors that have led to the development of the Web as a commercial medium, and finally, the barriers to commercial growth of the Web from both the supply and demand side perspectives. Chapter 3, "An Evaluation of the World Wide Web as a Platform for Electronic Commerce," by Daniel W. Connolly, evaluates the Web with respect to each of Douglas Englebart's twelve requirements for an open hyperdocument system. Englebart's requirements are derived from experience in using computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW) to support large-scale electronic commerce.

Part Two is entitled "General Business and Policy." The first of three chapters in this section is entitled "Electronic Commerce: A Washington Perspective." Its author, James B. Rapp, seeks to make those involved in electronic commerce aware that public policy issues need to be on their "radar screens" when making business decisions, as they will impact pricing, service/product offerings, and marketing approaches.

One of the most politically controversial areas in electronic commerce is the right of governments under certain legally defined conditions to get access to private information. In Chapter 5, Dorothy E. Denning outlines the isssues of establishing worldwide standards for creating and managing key escrows by trusted third parties that recognize the competing needs for privacy and governmental disclosure.

"The Essential Role of Trusted Third Parties in Electronic Commerce" by A. Michael Froomkin is the title of Chapter 6. In this chapter, Froomkin discusses the idea that cryptographic protocols for secure electronic transactions require that there be at least one trusted third party to the transaction, such as a bank or a "certification authority" (CA). These partly cryptographic, partly social protocols require new entities, or new relationships with existing entities, but the duties and liabilities of these entities are uncertain. Until these uncertainties are resolved, they risk inhibiting the spread of the most interesting forms of electronic commerce and causing unnecessary litigation. CAs do explain why these entities are important to electronic commerce and suggest that these entities are likely to provoke some interesting legal problems.

Part Three, "Pricing and Electronic Transactions," contains three chapters. Chapter 7, by Nathaniel S. Borenstein and coauthors, discusses the lessons First Virtual learned from a year's experience with the actual operation of its Internet Payment System, as well as the company's views on the future of First Virtual's Internet Payment System in particular, and on Internet commerce in general. Alok Gupta, Dale O. Stahl, and Andrew B. Whinston discuss "Economic Issues in Electronic Commerce" in Chapter 8. They focus on the economic challenges in this market and present some simulation results from the point of view of social welfare and optimal resource management. They also describe the difficulties of sustaining the socially optimal behavior because of the private market competition and the lack of property rights. Finally, Chapter 9, by B. Clifford Neuman, discusses the design of a flexible framework for network payment. Several payment models, including the NetCheque® and NetCash systems, are presented and their characteristics discussed. These two systems, developed at the University of Southern California, show how the design of a payment system can influence its flexibility by minimizing system-imposed constraints on the policies implemented by servers.

Part Four, entitled "Document Management and Digital Libraries," includes two chapters. Chapter 10 by Larry Masinter discusses electronic document management, reviews assumptions for future networking capabilities and electronic commerce, and presents an overview of four kinds of document management applications. It also explores the ways in which the network will change the nature of document management for each of those applications. In Chapter 11, "Smart Catalogs and Virtual Catalogs," Arthur M. Keller presents an architecture for electronic catalogs.

Business applications of electronic commerce are discussed in Part Five. The purpose of Chapter 12, by Aimo Hinkkanen and colleagues, is to describe an information system used in a real-time environment which can be employed to manage and control all activities in the supply chain. In Chapter 13, entitled "Electronic Markets," R. Preston McAfee and John McMillan present a radical new way of conducting auctions in the electronic environment. This chapter explains how electronic markets may function in creating allocations of goods and services where traditional supply and demand work poorly.

In Chapter 14, Ramnath Chellappa, Anitesh Barua, and Andrew B. Whinston discuss one of the industry's fastest-growing segments: corporate Intranets. Finally, Chapter 15, "Electronic Publishing versus Publishing Electronically," by Ramnath Chellappa, Anitesh Barua, Jennifer Oetzel, and Andrew B. Whinston, presents a revolutionary new way of utilizing Internet technology. The chapter shows how Marshall McLuhan was right when he said "The medium is the message."

In summary, investments in electronic commerce, whether in time or money, typically introduce far-reaching organizational and technological issues. It is no longer sufficient for electronic commerce to be viewed as a path-breaking technology. Electronic commerce is already playing a significant role in determining the strategy of today's companies in providing value to external and internal customers. The challenge facing companies is to increase the effectiveness of electronic commerce activities in order to achieve business performance. As successful organizations have taken a process-oriented view of their business, they will have to reevaluate the role of electronic commerce in terms of alignment with corporate goals.

Acknowledgments

We are deeply indebted to George Kozmetsky and the RGK Foundation for their financial support of the Sixth Organizational Computing, Coordination, and Collaboration Conference. Without their support, the conference would not have been possible. Cynthia Smith, Melissa Brown, and Jami Hampton, RGK Foundation staff, deserve special thanks for their flawless organization and execution of the conference. In addition, financial support from the Information Technology and Organizations program at the National Science Foundation helped make this a first-class conference and an international event. We especially wish to thank the program managers, Drs. Su Shing Chen and Les Gasser.

We would also like to thank Robert Sullivan, the Director of IC2, for his support and for allowing us to use IC2's conference facilities. We felt particularly fortunate because the acoustics and architecture of the IC2 complex make it uniquely suited to facilitating a lively exchange of ideas in an attractive environment. Debbie Lafferty, associate editor at Addison Wesley Longman, was amazingly patient from beginning to end, and her guidance along the way was invaluable. Finally, thanks goes to Jennifer Oetzel for her superb editorial work. She deserves our sincere gratitude for efficiently assembling the conference papers.

Ravi Kalakota
University of Rochester
kalakota@uhura.cc.rochester.edu

Andrew B. Whinston
University of Texas at Austin
abw@uts.cc.utexas.edu



0201880601P04062001

Updates

Submit Errata

More Information

InformIT Promotional Mailings & Special Offers

I would like to receive exclusive offers and hear about products from InformIT and its family of brands. I can unsubscribe at any time.

Overview


Pearson Education, Inc., 221 River Street, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030, (Pearson) presents this site to provide information about products and services that can be purchased through this site.

This privacy notice provides an overview of our commitment to privacy and describes how we collect, protect, use and share personal information collected through this site. Please note that other Pearson websites and online products and services have their own separate privacy policies.

Collection and Use of Information


To conduct business and deliver products and services, Pearson collects and uses personal information in several ways in connection with this site, including:

Questions and Inquiries

For inquiries and questions, we collect the inquiry or question, together with name, contact details (email address, phone number and mailing address) and any other additional information voluntarily submitted to us through a Contact Us form or an email. We use this information to address the inquiry and respond to the question.

Online Store

For orders and purchases placed through our online store on this site, we collect order details, name, institution name and address (if applicable), email address, phone number, shipping and billing addresses, credit/debit card information, shipping options and any instructions. We use this information to complete transactions, fulfill orders, communicate with individuals placing orders or visiting the online store, and for related purposes.

Surveys

Pearson may offer opportunities to provide feedback or participate in surveys, including surveys evaluating Pearson products, services or sites. Participation is voluntary. Pearson collects information requested in the survey questions and uses the information to evaluate, support, maintain and improve products, services or sites, develop new products and services, conduct educational research and for other purposes specified in the survey.

Contests and Drawings

Occasionally, we may sponsor a contest or drawing. Participation is optional. Pearson collects name, contact information and other information specified on the entry form for the contest or drawing to conduct the contest or drawing. Pearson may collect additional personal information from the winners of a contest or drawing in order to award the prize and for tax reporting purposes, as required by law.

Newsletters

If you have elected to receive email newsletters or promotional mailings and special offers but want to unsubscribe, simply email information@informit.com.

Service Announcements

On rare occasions it is necessary to send out a strictly service related announcement. For instance, if our service is temporarily suspended for maintenance we might send users an email. Generally, users may not opt-out of these communications, though they can deactivate their account information. However, these communications are not promotional in nature.

Customer Service

We communicate with users on a regular basis to provide requested services and in regard to issues relating to their account we reply via email or phone in accordance with the users' wishes when a user submits their information through our Contact Us form.

Other Collection and Use of Information


Application and System Logs

Pearson automatically collects log data to help ensure the delivery, availability and security of this site. Log data may include technical information about how a user or visitor connected to this site, such as browser type, type of computer/device, operating system, internet service provider and IP address. We use this information for support purposes and to monitor the health of the site, identify problems, improve service, detect unauthorized access and fraudulent activity, prevent and respond to security incidents and appropriately scale computing resources.

Web Analytics

Pearson may use third party web trend analytical services, including Google Analytics, to collect visitor information, such as IP addresses, browser types, referring pages, pages visited and time spent on a particular site. While these analytical services collect and report information on an anonymous basis, they may use cookies to gather web trend information. The information gathered may enable Pearson (but not the third party web trend services) to link information with application and system log data. Pearson uses this information for system administration and to identify problems, improve service, detect unauthorized access and fraudulent activity, prevent and respond to security incidents, appropriately scale computing resources and otherwise support and deliver this site and its services.

Cookies and Related Technologies

This site uses cookies and similar technologies to personalize content, measure traffic patterns, control security, track use and access of information on this site, and provide interest-based messages and advertising. Users can manage and block the use of cookies through their browser. Disabling or blocking certain cookies may limit the functionality of this site.

Do Not Track

This site currently does not respond to Do Not Track signals.

Security


Pearson uses appropriate physical, administrative and technical security measures to protect personal information from unauthorized access, use and disclosure.

Children


This site is not directed to children under the age of 13.

Marketing


Pearson may send or direct marketing communications to users, provided that

  • Pearson will not use personal information collected or processed as a K-12 school service provider for the purpose of directed or targeted advertising.
  • Such marketing is consistent with applicable law and Pearson's legal obligations.
  • Pearson will not knowingly direct or send marketing communications to an individual who has expressed a preference not to receive marketing.
  • Where required by applicable law, express or implied consent to marketing exists and has not been withdrawn.

Pearson may provide personal information to a third party service provider on a restricted basis to provide marketing solely on behalf of Pearson or an affiliate or customer for whom Pearson is a service provider. Marketing preferences may be changed at any time.

Correcting/Updating Personal Information


If a user's personally identifiable information changes (such as your postal address or email address), we provide a way to correct or update that user's personal data provided to us. This can be done on the Account page. If a user no longer desires our service and desires to delete his or her account, please contact us at customer-service@informit.com and we will process the deletion of a user's account.

Choice/Opt-out


Users can always make an informed choice as to whether they should proceed with certain services offered by InformIT. If you choose to remove yourself from our mailing list(s) simply visit the following page and uncheck any communication you no longer want to receive: www.informit.com/u.aspx.

Sale of Personal Information


Pearson does not rent or sell personal information in exchange for any payment of money.

While Pearson does not sell personal information, as defined in Nevada law, Nevada residents may email a request for no sale of their personal information to NevadaDesignatedRequest@pearson.com.

Supplemental Privacy Statement for California Residents


California residents should read our Supplemental privacy statement for California residents in conjunction with this Privacy Notice. The Supplemental privacy statement for California residents explains Pearson's commitment to comply with California law and applies to personal information of California residents collected in connection with this site and the Services.

Sharing and Disclosure


Pearson may disclose personal information, as follows:

  • As required by law.
  • With the consent of the individual (or their parent, if the individual is a minor)
  • In response to a subpoena, court order or legal process, to the extent permitted or required by law
  • To protect the security and safety of individuals, data, assets and systems, consistent with applicable law
  • In connection the sale, joint venture or other transfer of some or all of its company or assets, subject to the provisions of this Privacy Notice
  • To investigate or address actual or suspected fraud or other illegal activities
  • To exercise its legal rights, including enforcement of the Terms of Use for this site or another contract
  • To affiliated Pearson companies and other companies and organizations who perform work for Pearson and are obligated to protect the privacy of personal information consistent with this Privacy Notice
  • To a school, organization, company or government agency, where Pearson collects or processes the personal information in a school setting or on behalf of such organization, company or government agency.

Links


This web site contains links to other sites. Please be aware that we are not responsible for the privacy practices of such other sites. We encourage our users to be aware when they leave our site and to read the privacy statements of each and every web site that collects Personal Information. This privacy statement applies solely to information collected by this web site.

Requests and Contact


Please contact us about this Privacy Notice or if you have any requests or questions relating to the privacy of your personal information.

Changes to this Privacy Notice


We may revise this Privacy Notice through an updated posting. We will identify the effective date of the revision in the posting. Often, updates are made to provide greater clarity or to comply with changes in regulatory requirements. If the updates involve material changes to the collection, protection, use or disclosure of Personal Information, Pearson will provide notice of the change through a conspicuous notice on this site or other appropriate way. Continued use of the site after the effective date of a posted revision evidences acceptance. Please contact us if you have questions or concerns about the Privacy Notice or any objection to any revisions.

Last Update: November 17, 2020