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Modern Operating Systems, 4th Edition

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Modern Operating Systems, 4th Edition

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About

Features

Provide Practical Detail on the Big Picture Concepts

A clear and entertaining writing style outlines the concepts every OS designer needs to master.

  • In-depth topic coverage includes processes, threads, memory management, file systems, I/O, deadlocks, interface design, multimedia, performance tradeoffs, and the newest trends in OS design.
  • Multimedia file systems are covered–an important topic that most books miss. The chapter on Multimedia Operating Systems has been moved to the Web, primarily to make room for new material and keep the book from growing to a completely unmanageable size.
  • A thorough treatment of computer security includes viruses, worms, malware and other digital pests. This chapter far exceeds anything written in any other book. It also discusses ways to combat them.

Keep Your Course Current

  • Coverage of multiprocessors, multicomputers, virtual machines, and distributed systems reflects that the field is rapidly moving from an era of single-processor systems to multicore systems, multiprocessors, and distributed systems.
  • Case studies of popular operating systems: UNIX, Linux, Windows 8, and Android
    • NEW: Chapter 10, on UNIX, Linux, and Android is a revision of the old Chapter 10. The focus is clearly on Linux now, with a great deal of new material about Android, which was not in the previous edition.
    • NEW: Chapter 11 in the third edition was on Windows Vista. A chapter on Windows 8, specifically Windows 8.1, has replaced that. It brings the treatment of Windows completely up to date.
  • NEW and UPDATED: Chapters 2—6 have been updated, with older material removed and some new material added.
    • Chapter 2: Added information on the futex synchronization primitive, and a section about how to avoid locking altogether with Read-Copy-Update.
    • Chapter 3: More focus on modern hardware and less emphasis on segmentation and Multics.
    • Chapter 4: CD-Roms are removed, as they are no longer very common, and replaced with more modern solutions (like flash drives). Also, we added RAID level 6 to the section on RAID.
    • Chapter 5: Older devices like CRT and CD-ROMs have been removed, while new technology, like touch screens have been added. The sections on current research in these chapters have been rewritten from scratch. New problems and programming exercises have been added.
  • NEW: Chapter 7 is completely new. It covers the important topics of virtualization and the cloud.
  • NEW and UPDATED: Chapter 8 is an updated version of the previous material on multiprocessor systems. There is more emphasis on multicore systems now, which have become so important in the past few years. A long section on VMware has been added.
  • NEW and UPDATED: Chapter 9 has been heavily revised and reorganized, with considerable new material on exploiting code bugs, malware, and defenses against them.
  • UPDATED: Chapter 12 is a revised version of Chap. 13 from the previous edition.
  • A Research section in many chapters describes current research in the topic covered by the chapter.

Enhance Learning with Student and Instructor Resources

Student Resources Include:

  • Online Exercises provide hands-on experience with building as well as analyzing the performance of OS. In particular, these exercises have been designed to provide experience with analyzing the resource consumptions in Windows and Linux.
  • Simulation Exercises are designed to provide experience with building some key components of an OS, including process scheduling, main memory allocation, paging algorithms and virtual memory, and file systems.
  • Student Tools and Lab Experiments allow students to download the tools and run the experiments to gain deeper knowledge of the subject.

Password-Protected Instructor Resources (Select the Resources Tab to View Downloadable Files):

  • Power Point Lecture Slides
  • Figures in both .jpeg and .eps file format
  • Solutions to Exercises

Description

  • Copyright 2015
  • Dimensions: 7" x 9-1/8"
  • Pages: 1136
  • Edition: 4th
  • Book
  • ISBN-10: 0-13-359162-X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0-13-359162-0

Modern Operating Systems, Fourth Edition, is intended for introductory courses in Operating Systems in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, and Electrical Engineering programs. It also serves as a useful reference for OS professionals

The widely anticipated revision of this worldwide best-seller incorporates the latest developments in operating systems (OS) technologies. The Fourth Edition includes up-to-date materials on relevant¿OS. Tanenbaum also provides information on current research based on his experience as an operating systems researcher.

Modern Operating Systems, Third Editionwas the recipient of the 2010 McGuffey Longevity Award. The McGuffey Longevity Award recognizes textbooks whose excellence has been demonstrated over time.¿http://taaonline.net/index.html

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Teaching and Learning Experience

This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience–for you and your students. It will help:

  • Provide Practical Detail on the Big Picture Concepts: A clear and entertaining writing style outlines the concepts every OS designer needs to master.
  • Keep Your Course Current: This edition includes information on the latest OS technologies and developments
  • Enhance Learning with Student and Instructor Resources: Students will gain hands-on experience using the simulation exercises and lab experiments.

Sample Content

Table of Contents

Brief Contents

  • CHAPTER 1 "INTRODUCTION"
    • 1.1 WHAT IS AN OPERATING SYSTEM?
      • 1.1.1 The Operating System as an Extended Machine
      • 1.1.2 The Operating System as a Resource Manager
    • 1.2 HISTORY OF OPERATING SYSTEMS
      • 1.2.1 The First Generation (1945-55): Vacuum Tubes
      • 1.2.2 The Second Generation (1955-65): Transistors and Batch Systems
      • 1.2.3 The Third Generation (1965-1980): ICs and Multiprogramming
      • 1.2.4 The Fourth Generation (1980-Present): Personal Computers
      • 1.2.5 The Fifth Generation (1990-Present): Mobile Computers
    • 1.3 COMPUTER HARDWARE REVIEW
      • 1.3.1 Processors
      • 1.3.2 Memory
      • 1.3.3 Disks
      • 1.3.4 I/O Devices
      • 1.3.5 Buses
      • 1.3.6 Booting the Computer
    • 1.4 THE OPERATING SYSTEM ZOO
      • 1.4.1 Mainframe Operating Systems
      • 1.4.2 Server Operating Systems
      • 1.4.3 Multiprocessor Operating Systems
      • 1.4.4 Personal Computer Operating Systems
      • 1.4.5 Handheld Computer Operating Systems
      • 1.4.6 Embedded Operating Systems.
      • 1.4.7 Sensor-Node Operating Systems
      • 1.4.8 Real-Time Operating Systems
      • 1.4.9 Smart Card Operating Systems
    • 1.5 OPERATING SYSTEM CONCEPTS
      • 1.5.1 Processes
      • 1.5.2 Address Spaces
      • 1.5.3 Files
      • 1.5.4 Input/Output
      • 1.5.5 Protection
      • 1.5.6 The Shell
      • 1.5.7 Ontogeny Recapitulates Phylogeny
    • 1.6 SYSTEM CALLS
      • 1.6.1 System Calls for Process Management
      • 1.6.2 System Calls for File Management
      • 1.6.3 System Calls for Directory Management
      • 1.6.4 Miscellaneous System Calls
      • 1.6.5 The Windows Win32 API
    • 1.7 OPERATING SYSTEM STRUCTURE
      • 1.7.1 Monolithic Systems
      • 1.7.2 Layered Systems
      • 1.7.3 Microkernels
      • 1.7.4 Client-Server Model
      • 1.7.5 Virtual Machines
      • 1.7.6 Exokernels
    • 1.8 THE WORLD ACCORDING TO C
      • 1.8.1 The C Language
      • 1.8.2 Header Files
      • 1.8.3 Large Programming Projects
      • 1.8.4 The Model of Run Time
    • 1.9 RESEARCH ON OPERATING SYSTEMS
    • 1.10 OUTLINE OF THE REST OF THIS BOOK
    • 1.11 METRIC UNITS
    • 1.12 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 2 "PROCESSES AND THREADS"
    • 2.1 PROCESSES
      • 2.1.1 The Process Model
      • 2.1.2 Process Creation
      • 2.1.3 Process Termination
      • 2.1.4 Process Hierarchies
      • 2.1.5 Process States
      • 2.1.6 Implementation of Processes
      • 2.1.7 Modeling Multiprogramming
    • 2.2 THREADS
      • 2.2.1 Thread Usage
      • 2.2.2 The Classical Thread Model
      • 2.2.3 POSIX Threads
      • 2.2.4 Implementing Threads in User Space
      • 2.2.5 Implementing Threads in the Kernel
      • 2.2.6 Hybrid Implementations
      • 2.2.7 Scheduler Activations
      • 2.2.8 Pop-Up Threads
      • 2.2.9 Making Single-Threaded Code Multithreaded
    • 2.3 INTERPROCESS COMMUNICATION
      • 2.3.1 Race Conditions
      • 2.3.2 Critical Regions
      • 2.3.3 Mutual Exclusion with Busy Waiting
      • 2.3.4 Sleep and Wakeup
      • 2.3.5 Semaphores
      • 2.3.6 Mutexes
      • 2.3.7 Monitors
      • 2.3.8 Message Passing
      • 2.3.9 Barriers
      • 2.3.10 Avoiding Locks: Read-Copy-Update
    • 2.4 SCHEDULING
      • 2.4.1 Introduction to Scheduling
      • 2.4.2 Scheduling in Batch Systems
      • 2.4.3 Scheduling in Interactive Systems
      • 2.4.4 Scheduling in Real-Time Systems
      • 2.4.5 Policy Versus Mechanism
      • 2.4.6 Thread Scheduling
    • 2.5 CLASSICAL IPC PROBLEMS
      • 2.5.1 The Dining Philosophers Problem
      • 2.5.2 The Readers and Writers Problem
    • 2.6 RESEARCH ON PROCESSES AND THREADS
    • 2.7 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 3 "MEMORY MANAGEMENT"
    • 3.1 NO MEMORY ABSTRACTION
    • 3.2 A MEMORY ABSTRACTION: ADDRESS SPACES
      • 3.2.1 The Notion of an Address Space
      • 3.2.2 Swapping
      • 3.2.3 Managing Free Memory
    • 3.3 VIRTUAL MEMORY
      • 3.3.1 Paging
      • 3.3.2 Page Tables
      • 3.3.3 Speeding Up Paging
      • 3.3.4 Page Tables for Large Memories
    • 3.4 PAGE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS
      • 3.4.1 The Optimal Page Replacement Algorithm
      • 3.4.2 The Not Recently Used Page Replacement Algorithm
      • 3.4.3 The First-In, First-Out (FIFO) Page Replacement Algorithm
      • 3.4.4 The Second-Chance Page Replacement Algorithm
      • 3.4.5 The Clock Page Replacement Algorithm
      • 3.4.6 The Least Recently Used (LRU) Page Replacement Algorithm
      • 3.4.7 Simulating LRU in Software
      • 3.4.8 The Working Set Page Replacement Algorithm
      • 3.4.9 The WSClock Page Replacement Algorithm
      • 3.4.10 Summary of Page Replacement Algorithms
    • 3.5 DESIGN ISSUES FOR PAGING SYSTEMS
      • 3.5.1 Local versus Global Allocation Policies
      • 3.5.2 Load Control
      • 3.5.3 Page Size
      • 3.5.4 Separate Instruction and Data Spaces
      • 3.5.5 Shared Pages
      • 3.5.6 Shared Libraries
      • 3.5.7 Mapped Files
      • 3.5.8 Cleaning Policy
      • 3.5.9 Virtual Memory Interface
    • 3.6 IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES
      • 3.6.1 Operating System Involvement with Paging
      • 3.6.2 Page Fault Handling
      • 3.6.3 Instruction Backup
      • 3.6.4 Locking Pages in Memory
      • 3.6.5 Backing Store
      • 3.6.6 Separation of Policy and Mechanism
    • 3.7 SEGMENTATION
      • 3.7.1 Implementation of Pure Segmentation
      • 3.7.2 Segmentation with Paging: MULTICS
      • 3.7.3 Segmentation with Paging: The Intel x86
    • 3.8 RESEARCH ON MEMORY MANAGEMENT
    • 3.9 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 4 "FILE SYSTEMS"
    • 4.1 FILES
      • 4.1.1 File Naming
      • 4.1.2 File Structure
      • 4.1.3 File Types
      • 4.1.4 File Access
      • 4.1.5 File Attributes
      • 4.1.6 File Operations
      • 4.1.7 An Example Program Using File-System Calls
    • 4.2 DIRECTORIES
      • 4.2.1 Single-Level Directory Systems
      • 4.2.2 Hierarchical Directory Systems
      • 4.2.3 Path Names
      • 4.2.4 Directory Operations
    • 4.3 FILE SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION
      • 4.3.1 File-System Layout
      • 4.3.2 Implementing Files
      • 4.3.3 Implementing Directories
      • 4.3.4 Shared Files
      • 4.3.5 Log-Structured File Systems
      • 4.3.6 Journaling File Systems
      • 4.3.7 Virtual File Systems
    • 4.4 FILE-SYSTEM MANAGEMENT AND OPTIMIZATION
      • 4.4.1 Disk-Space Management
      • 4.4.2 File-System Backups
      • 4.4.3 File-System Consistency
      • 4.4.4 File-System Performance
      • 4.4.5 Defragmenting Disks
    • 4.5 EXAMPLE FILE SYSTEMS
      • 4.5.1 The MS-DOS File System
      • 4.5.2 The UNIX V7 File System
      • 4.5.3 CD-ROM File Systems
    • 4.6 RESEARCH ON FILE SYSTEMS
    • 4.7 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 5 "INPUT/OUTPUT"
    • 5.1 PRINCIPLES OF I/O HARDWARE
      • 5.1.1 I/O Devices
      • 5.1.2 Device Controllers
      • 5.1.3 Memory-Mapped I/O
      • 5.1.4 Direct Memory Access
      • 5.1.5 Interrupts Revisited
    • 5.2 PRINCIPLES OF I/O SOFTWARE
      • 5.2.1 Goals of the I/O Software
      • 5.2.2 Programmed I/O
      • 5.2.3 Interrupt-Driven I/O
      • 5.2.4 I/O Using DMA
    • 5.3 I/O SOFTWARE LAYERS
      • 5.3.1 Interrupt Handlers
      • 5.3.2 Device Drivers
      • 5.3.3 Device-Independent I/O Software
      • 5.3.4 User-Space I/O Software
    • 5.4 DISKS
      • 5.4.1 Disk Hardware
      • 5.4.2 Disk Formatting
      • 5.4.3 Disk Arm Scheduling Algorithms
      • 5.4.4 Error Handling
      • 5.4.5 Stable Storage
    • 5.5 CLOCKS
      • 5.5.1 Clock Hardware
      • 5.5.2 Clock Software
      • 5.5.3 Soft Timers
    • 5.6 USER INTERFACES: KEYBOARD, MOUSE, MONITOR
      • 5.6.1 Input Software
      • 5.6.2 Output Software
    • 5.7 THIN CLIENTS
    • 5.8 POWER MANAGEMENT
      • 5.8.1 Hardware Issues
      • 5.8.2 Operating System Issues
      • 5.8.3 Application Program Issues
    • 5.9 RESEARCH ON INPUT/OUTPUT
    • 5.10 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 6 "DEADLOCKS"
    • 6.1 RESOURCES
      • 6.1.1 Preemptable and Nonpreemptable Resources
      • 6.1.2 Resource Acquisition
    • 6.2 INTRODUCTION TO DEADLOCKS
      • 6.2.1 Conditions for Resource Deadlocks
      • 6.2.2 Deadlock Modeling
    • 6.3 THE OSTRICH ALGORITHM
    • 6.4 DEADLOCK DETECTION AND RECOVERY
      • 6.4.1 Deadlock Detection with One Resource of Each Type
      • 6.4.2 Deadlock Detection with Multiple Resources of Each Type
      • 6.4.3 Recovery from Deadlock
    • 6.5 DEADLOCK AVOIDANCE
      • 6.5.1 Resource Trajectories
      • 6.5.2 Safe and Unsafe States
      • 6.5.3 The Banker's Algorithm for a Single Resource
      • 6.5.4 The Banker's Algorithm for Multiple Resources
    • 6.6 DEADLOCK PREVENTION
      • 6.6.1 Attacking the Mutual Exclusion Condition
      • 6.6.2 Attacking the Hold and Wait Condition
      • 6.6.3 Attacking the No Preemption Condition
      • 6.6.4 Attacking the Circular Wait Condition
    • 6.7 OTHER ISSUES
      • 6.7.1 Two-Phase Locking
      • 6.7.2 Communication Deadlocks
      • 6.7.3 Livelock
      • 6.7.4 Starvation
    • 6.8 RESEARCH ON DEADLOCKS
    • 6.9 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 7 "VIRTUALIZATION AND THE CLOUD"
    • 7.1 HISTORY
    • 7.2 REQUIREMENTS FOR VIRTUALIZATION
    • 7.3 TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 HYPERVISORS
    • 7.4 TECHNIQUES FOR EFFICIENT VIRTUALIZATION
      • 7.4.1 Virtualizing the Unvirtualizable
      • 7.4.2 The Cost of Virtualization
    • 7.5 ARE HYPERVISORS MICROKERNELS DONE RIGHT?
    • 7.6 MEMORY VIRTUALIZATION
    • 7.7 I/O VIRTUALIZATION
    • 7.8 VIRTUAL APPLIANCES
    • 7.9 VIRTUAL MACHINES ON MULTICORE CPUS
    • 7.10 LICENSING ISSUES
    • 7.11 CLOUDS
      • 7.11.1 Clouds as a Service
      • 7.11.2 Virtual Machine Migration
      • 7.11.3 Checkpointing
    • 7.12 CASE STUDY: VMWARE
      • 7.12.1 The early history of VMware
      • 7.12.2 VMware Workstation
      • 7.12.3 Challenges in Bringing Virtualization to the x86
      • 7.12.4 VMware Workstation: Solution Overview
      • 7.12.5 The Evolution of VMware Workstation
      • 7.12.6 ESX Server: VMware's type-1 hypervisor
    • 7.13 RESEARCH ON VIRTUALIZATION AND THE CLOUD
  • CHAPTER 8 "MULTIPLE PROCESSOR SYSTEMS"
    • 8.1 MULTIPROCESSORS
      • 8.1.1 Multiprocessor Hardware
      • 8.1.2 Multiprocessor Operating System Types
      • 8.1.3 Multiprocessor Synchronization
      • 8.1.4 Multiprocessor Scheduling
    • 8.2 MULTICOMPUTERS
      • 8.2.1 Multicomputer Hardware
      • 8.2.2 Low-Level Communication Software
      • 8.2.3 User-Level Communication Software
      • 8.2.4 Remote Procedure Call
      • 8.2.5 Distributed Shared Memory
      • 8.2.6 Multicomputer Scheduling
      • 8.2.7 Load Balancing
    • 8.3 DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS
      • 8.3.1 Network Hardware
      • 8.3.2 Network Services and Protocols
      • 8.3.3 Document-Based Middleware
      • 8.3.4 File-System-Based Middleware
      • 8.3.5 Object-Based Middleware
      • 8.3.6 Coordination-Based Middleware
    • 8.4 RESEARCH ON MULTIPLE PROCESSOR SYSTEMS
    • 8.5 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 9 "SECURITY"
    • 9.1 THE SECURITY ENVIRONMENT
      • 9.1.1 Threats
      • 9.1.2 Attackers
    • 9.2 OPERATING SYSTEMS SECURITY
      • 9.2.1 Can We Build Secure Systems?
      • 9.2.2 Trusted Computing Base
    • 9.3 CONTROLLING ACCESS TO RESOURCES
      • 9.3.1 Protection Domains
      • 9.3.2 Access Control Lists
      • 9.3.3 Capabilities
    • 9.4 FORMAL MODELS OF SECURE SYSTEMS
      • 9.4.1 Multilevel Security
      • 9.4.2 Covert Channels
    • 9.5 BASICS OF CRYPTOGRAPHY
      • 9.5.1 Secret-Key Cryptography
      • 9.5.2 Public-Key Cryptography
      • 9.5.3 One-Way Functions
      • 9.5.4 Digital Signatures
      • 9.5.5 Trusted Platform Module
    • 9.6 AUTHENTICATION
      • 9.6.1 Authentication Using a Physical Object
      • 9.6.2 Authentication Using Biometrics
    • 9.7 EXPLOITING SOFTWARE
      • 9.7.1 Buffer Overflow Attacks
      • 9.7.2 Format String Attacks
      • 9.7.3 Dangling Pointers
      • 9.7.4 Null Pointer Dereference Attacks
      • 9.7.5 Integer Overflow Attacks
      • 9.7.6 Command Injection Attacks
      • 9.7.7 Time of Check to Time of Use (TOCTOU) Attacks
    • 9.8 INSIDER ATTACKS
      • 9.8.1 Logic Bombs
      • 9.8.2 Back Doors
      • 9.8.3 Login Spoofing
    • 9.9 MALWARE
      • 9.9.1 Trojan Horses
      • 9.9.2 Viruses
      • 9.9.3 Worms
      • 9.9.4 Spyware
      • 9.9.5 Rootkits
    • 9.10 DEFENSES
      • 9.10.1 Firewalls
      • 9.10.2 Antivirus and Anti-Antivirus Techniques
      • 9.10.3 Code Signing
      • 9.10.4 Jailing
      • 9.10.5 Model-Based Intrusion Detection
      • 9.10.6 Encapsulating Mobile Code
      • 9.10.7 Java Security
    • 9.11 RESEARCH ON SECURITY
    • 9.12 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 10 "CASE STUDY 1: UNIX, LINUX, AND ANDROID"
    • 10.1 HISTORY OF UNIX AND LINUX
      • 10.1.1 UNICS
      • 10.1.2 PDP-11 UNIX
      • 10.1.3 Portable UNIX
      • 10.1.4 Berkeley UNIX
      • 10.1.5 Standard UNIX
      • 10.1.6 MINIX
      • 10.1.7 Linux
    • 10.2 OVERVIEW OF LINUX
      • 10.2.1 Linux Goals
      • 10.2.2 Interfaces to Linux
      • 10.2.3 The Shell
      • 10.2.4 Linux Utility Programs
      • 10.2.5 Kernel Structure
    • 10.3 PROCESSES IN LINUX
      • 10.3.1 Fundamental Concepts
      • 10.3.2 Process Management System Calls in Linux
      • 10.3.3 Implementation of Processes and Threads in Linux
      • 10.3.4 Scheduling in Linux
      • 10.3.5 Booting Linux
    • 10.4 MEMORY MANAGEMENT IN LINUX
      • 10.4.1 Fundamental Concepts
      • 10.4.2 Memory Management System Calls in Linux
      • 10.4.3 Implementation of Memory Management in Linux
      • 10.4.4 Paging in Linux
    • 10.5 INPUT/OUTPUT IN LINUX
      • 10.5.1 Fundamental Concepts
      • 10.5.2 Networking
      • 10.5.3 Input/Output System Calls in Linux
      • 10.5.4 Implementation of Input/Output in Linux
      • 10.5.5 Modules in Linux
    • 10.6 THE LINUX FILE SYSTEM
      • 10.6.1 Fundamental Concepts
      • 10.6.2 File System Calls in Linux
      • 10.6.3 Implementation of the Linux File System
      • 10.6.4 NFS: The Network File System
    • 10.7 SECURITY IN LINUX
      • 10.7.1 Fundamental Concepts
      • 10.7.2 Security System Calls in Linux
      • 10.7.3 Implementation of Security in Linux
    • 10.8 ANDROID
    • 10.9 SUMMARY
  • CHAPTER 11 "CASE STUDY 2: WINDOWS 8"
    • 11.1 HISTORY OF WINDOWS THROUGH WINDOWS 8.1
      • 11.1.1 1980s: MS-DOS
      • 11.1.2 1990s: MS-DOS-based Windows
      • 11.1.3 2000s: NT-based Windows
      • 11.1.4 Windows Vista
      • 11.1.5 2010s: Modern Windows
    • 11.2 PROGRAMMING WINDOWS
      • 11.2.1 The Native NT Application Programming Interface
      • 11.2.2 The Win32 Application Programming Interface
      • 11.2.3 The Windows Registry
    • 11.3 SYSTEM STRUCTURE
      • 11.3.1 Operating System Structure
      • 11.3.2 Booting Windows
      • 11.3.3 Implementation of the Object Manager
      • 11.3.4 Subsystems, DLLs, and User-Mode Services
    • 11.4 PROCESSES AND THREADS IN WINDOWS
      • 11.4.1 Fundamental Concepts
      • 11.4.2 Job, Process, Thread, and Fiber Management API Calls
      • 11.4.3 Implementation of Processes and Threads
    • 11.5 MEMORY MANAGEMENT
      • 11.5.1 Fundamental Concepts
      • 11.5.2 Memory Management System Calls
      • 11.5.3 Implemen

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  • Pearson will not knowingly direct or send marketing communications to an individual who has expressed a preference not to receive marketing.
  • Where required by applicable law, express or implied consent to marketing exists and has not been withdrawn.

Pearson may provide personal information to a third party service provider on a restricted basis to provide marketing solely on behalf of Pearson or an affiliate or customer for whom Pearson is a service provider. Marketing preferences may be changed at any time.

Correcting/Updating Personal Information


If a user's personally identifiable information changes (such as your postal address or email address), we provide a way to correct or update that user's personal data provided to us. This can be done on the Account page. If a user no longer desires our service and desires to delete his or her account, please contact us at customer-service@informit.com and we will process the deletion of a user's account.

Choice/Opt-out


Users can always make an informed choice as to whether they should proceed with certain services offered by InformIT. If you choose to remove yourself from our mailing list(s) simply visit the following page and uncheck any communication you no longer want to receive: www.informit.com/u.aspx.

Sale of Personal Information


Pearson does not rent or sell personal information in exchange for any payment of money.

While Pearson does not sell personal information, as defined in Nevada law, Nevada residents may email a request for no sale of their personal information to NevadaDesignatedRequest@pearson.com.

Supplemental Privacy Statement for California Residents


California residents should read our Supplemental privacy statement for California residents in conjunction with this Privacy Notice. The Supplemental privacy statement for California residents explains Pearson's commitment to comply with California law and applies to personal information of California residents collected in connection with this site and the Services.

Sharing and Disclosure


Pearson may disclose personal information, as follows:

  • As required by law.
  • With the consent of the individual (or their parent, if the individual is a minor)
  • In response to a subpoena, court order or legal process, to the extent permitted or required by law
  • To protect the security and safety of individuals, data, assets and systems, consistent with applicable law
  • In connection the sale, joint venture or other transfer of some or all of its company or assets, subject to the provisions of this Privacy Notice
  • To investigate or address actual or suspected fraud or other illegal activities
  • To exercise its legal rights, including enforcement of the Terms of Use for this site or another contract
  • To affiliated Pearson companies and other companies and organizations who perform work for Pearson and are obligated to protect the privacy of personal information consistent with this Privacy Notice
  • To a school, organization, company or government agency, where Pearson collects or processes the personal information in a school setting or on behalf of such organization, company or government agency.

Links


This web site contains links to other sites. Please be aware that we are not responsible for the privacy practices of such other sites. We encourage our users to be aware when they leave our site and to read the privacy statements of each and every web site that collects Personal Information. This privacy statement applies solely to information collected by this web site.

Requests and Contact


Please contact us about this Privacy Notice or if you have any requests or questions relating to the privacy of your personal information.

Changes to this Privacy Notice


We may revise this Privacy Notice through an updated posting. We will identify the effective date of the revision in the posting. Often, updates are made to provide greater clarity or to comply with changes in regulatory requirements. If the updates involve material changes to the collection, protection, use or disclosure of Personal Information, Pearson will provide notice of the change through a conspicuous notice on this site or other appropriate way. Continued use of the site after the effective date of a posted revision evidences acceptance. Please contact us if you have questions or concerns about the Privacy Notice or any objection to any revisions.

Last Update: November 17, 2020