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Applying Some Color

Figure 9 shows what the newly created logos look in their plain white format. However, the more I thought about it, these new logos should have the same colors as the original. The question was how to get the colors on. I tried some tests with markers, highlighters, crayons, pencils, and so on, but they all left behind trails that did not look very good.

Finally, I decided to locate a see-through plastic piece from a folder lid that would allow enough light in to shade the color, but be thin enough to keep the quality of the light visible like the center Mac logo. Fortunately, Staples had the perfect folder at $.49 each—and they even came in red-blue-yellow-green, the colors of the Windows flag. I also picked up a $10 set of Sharpie markers to draw the penguin.

Once I got back to the shop, I again used the stencil approach to cut out the flag section, except that I left about an inch on two sides of each flag piece to ensure that I could tape it in place onto the lid. After cutting and sticking each piece in its appropriate place, I took a look and saw that the coloration was perfect.

My final step was to draw a penguin. So I opened up Photoshop, performed a horizontal flip on the penguin image, and printed it out on a color printer. I then placed the lid upside down on the newly printed picture and started to copy the details with the Sharpies. As it turns out, the Sharpies were a good idea because they allowed layering. In other words, I colored in the first layer, waited a few minutes for the ink to dry, and then recolored the same area. This resulted in a mostly constant coloration for the penguin. I also left the outermost sides uncolored to provide a contrast for the black body of the penguin.

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