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  1. Installation Summary
  2. Things You Need to Know
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This chapter is from the book

This chapter is from the book

Things You Need to Know

To get the best sound quality and take advantage of the advanced features in Skype, you need a reasonably fast computer, a way to hear and speak (headset, handset, or set of speakers and a microphone), and a broadband connection to the Internet (DSL, cable, or broadband cellular wireless). You can install and use Skype with a dial-up connection over the traditional telephone network, however, as long as you are not uploading or downloading other data at the same time.

Headsets, microphones/speakers, and USB handsets are available at computer retailers; most office-supply stores; and many online retailers, including the Skype Accessories Store (www.skype.com/store/).

And although you don't need an expensive headset to get good sound quality, getting one with a built-in microphone will make a big difference in your Skype experience. Some people claim that the inexpensive headsets work as well as the more expensive ones on PCs.

Minimum System Requirements

For you to be able to use Skype software after you install it, your computer must meet the minimum system requirements shown in Table 3-1.

Recommended System Requirements

For you to take full advantage of Skype software after you install it, your computer should meet approximately the recommended system requirements shown in Table 3-2.

View Table

Although you can run Skype on a computer that meets the minimum system requirements, the quality of the call depends on the performance of the computer, the speakers/microphone, and the speed of the Internet connection at both ends of the conversation.

Therefore, to get the best sound quality possible and to take advantage of the advanced Skype features, you will benefit from a powerful computer with a broadband connection, as well as a headset or handset with a built-in microphone.

How Much Does Skype Cost?

Downloading, installing, and using Skype on a computer are free when you communicate with people who are also using Skype on their computers. Skype does charge for value-added services, however (such as SkypeIn and SkypeOut), and there are natural costs associated with the basic computer setup and network access needed to connect to the Internet and run Skype.

Computer Connection and Headset Costs

To run Skype on a computer, you need a desktop, laptop, or Pocket PC device with sound capabilities, as well as a broadband connection. If you want to use Skype Video, you will also need a Webcam.

Skype works adequately on a 56K dial-up connection, but it is advisable to upgrade to a DSL, cable, or cellular broadband service to get the best possible sound. For minimum and recommended system requirements, refer back to Tables 3-1 and 3-2.

You also need a headset or speakers and a built-in or plug-in microphone. You can acquire a decent headset from the Skype Store or a retailer in the United States (such as Radio Shack) for as little as $12 U.S., and some people claim that the inexpensive headsets work as well as the more expensive ones on PCs.

Companies such as Plantronics and Logitech sell premium headsets with features like noise cancellation, higher-quality speakers, folding ability, and ergonomics in different styles at prices ranging from $12 to $75 U.S. Companies including Motorola sell wireless Bluetooth headsets for approximately $100 U.S.

Alternatively, you can use a handset like the Linksys cordless phone or the CyberPhone, which plugs into your computer's USB port. The USB handsets cost approximately $75 U.S., and the residential dual-mode cordless phones ring in at around $175 U.S. Again, you do not have to have a fancy or expensive headset to enjoy using Skype.

Webcams are available from companies such as Logitech, Creative Labs, and Hewlett-Packard. They range in price from $20 to $150 U.S., depending on image resolution and features.

Skype-to-Skype Is Free

If you have access to the Internet, there is no charge for using Skype for voice calls, instant messaging, and transferring files between two Skype accounts (and for conference calls to up to five Skype accounts). Calls from one Skype account to another are always free.

Voicemail

Skype offers free voicemail with a SkypeIn subscription, or a separate voicemail subscription for 3 months or 12 months. Currently, subscriptions are approximately $5 U.S. for three months and $15 U.S. for an annual subscription.

Test Your Connection Speed (Optional)

If you plan to use Skype with a dial-up connection, it is highly recommended that you test your connection speed before you download and install Skype. If you find that your Internet connection speed is less than 56 kilobits per second (Kbps), consider upgrading to a broadband connection of at least 128 Kbps.

Internet connection speed refers to the rate of speed at which data transfers between the Internet and your computer. Put simply, it is the amount of time it takes your computer to download (or upload) a certain amount of data.

You can find any number of Web sites that offer tools for testing the speed of your Internet connection. The best way to find one is to use your favorite search engine and look for "testing Internet connection speed."

Internet-connection-speed tools allow you to see how fast your connection actually is, regardless of the type of connection you have, how fast the connection is rated, and the kind of computer you use to browse the Web.

Here are some popular Web sites that offer tools for testing your connection to the Internet:

Installing Skype on Microsoft Windows 2000/XP

To install Skype on your computer, you need to download the Skype application from the Skype Web site; save the installation file on your computer; and then begin the actual installation process, using an installation wizard that takes you through each step of the process.

This section discusses the steps for downloading and installing Skype on a Windows PC running Windows 2000, Windows XP Home Edition, or Windows XP Professional.

Downloading Skype to Your Windows PC

  1. Open Internet Explorer or your favorite Web browser, and enter www.skype.com in the address bar.
  2. Click the Download link on the Skype Web site; click the Windows link; and click Download Skype. You will see the Skype for Windows Web page. Wait a moment, and under normal circumstances you will see the File Download window, which should display after 10 or 15 seconds. If the File Download window fails to display automatically, go ahead and click the Download Skype for Windows link.
  3. When you see the File Download window, click Save, as shown in Figure 3-1.
    hmfig3_1.jpg

    Figure 3-1 Downloading the Skype installer

  4. Decide whether you want to use the default folder to save the Skype installation file that is about to be downloaded, and click Save, as shown in Figure 3-2.
    hmfig3_2.jpg

    Figure 3-2 Saving the Skype installer on your computer

    It does not matter where you save this file as long as you remember where it is. Common alternatives to the default location are the Windows Desktop or My Documents folder.
  5. When you are ready to begin downloading the file to your computer, click OK.

When the download is complete, the installation may begin automatically. If it doesn't, close the File Download window. If the Skype Setup Wizard begins automatically, skip to step 2 in the next section to continue.

Using the Skype Setup Wizard

To install Skype on your PC, follow these steps:

  1. When you have closed the File Download window and are ready to install Skype, locate and double-click the Skype installation file, SkypeSetup.exe, that you just downloaded to your computer. You will see the Skype Setup Wizard.
  2. Decide which language you prefer, and click Next.
  3. Read the Skype license agreement; select I Accept the Agreement (see Figure 3-3); and click Next.
    hmfig3_3.jpg

    Figure 3-3 Accept the Skype license agreement

  4. Decide whether you want to use the default folder to install Skype on your computer or choose an alternative location; then click Next. By default, Skype chooses C:\Program Files\Skype\Phone. This is fine unless you have a reason to install it somewhere else.
  5. Choose which additional installation tasks should be performed (see Figure 3-4).
    hmfig3_4.jpg

    Figure 3-4 Choose additional installation tasks

    • By default, Skype will start automatically and then run in the background when you turn on your computer. If your computer usually is connected to the Internet, this option is fine.

      If your computer generally is not connected to the Internet, do not have Skype start automatically, because when your computer boots up and is not connected to the Internet, Skype will continue trying to connect to the Internet until it succeeds or you quit the application.

    • Other options include creating a desktop icon and/or quick-launch icon. Choosing one or both of these options is fine. A desktop icon allows you to start Skype by clicking an icon on your desktop. A quick-launch icon displays in your Windows taskbar.
  6. Click Next. The process of installing files on your hard disk should take less than a minute.
  7. Complete the Skype Setup Wizard (see Figure 3-5).
    hmfig3_5.jpg

    Figure 3-5 Finish installation

  8. If you are interested in late-breaking news about the version of Skype you are installing, or if you have previously installed Skype and are upgrading to a newer version, you may want to review the online release notes.
  9. Complete the Skype installation by clicking Finish.

Now you're ready to create a new Skype account. You may want to install the optional Skype toolbar or jump directly to Chapter 4.

Installing the Skype Web Toolbar (Optional)

You can install the optional Skype toolbar for Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, or Outlook to streamline your Skype use and take advantage of enhanced Web-based Skype features. The Skype Web Toolbar lets you access Skype directly from Internet Explorer 5.0 or later, Firefox, or Outlook on a PC running Windows XP or Windows 2000.

The Skype toolbar allows you to:

  • Launch various Skype functions from your browser window without having to open a Skype window. This means that from your browser, you can check to see which of your contacts is online, make calls, or start chats. You can also check your balances or go directly to the Skype Web site.
  • Open a regular Web page and have Skype automatically identify any telephone numbers and convert them to SkypeOut links. You no longer have to leave your computer, pick up the phone, and dial a number.

To install the Skype Web Toolbar, you need to download the toolbar installation file from the Skype Web site, save the installation file on your computer, and then execute the installation process and toolbar configuration.

To install the Skype toolbar, follow these steps:

  1. Open Internet Explorer or the Mozilla Firefox Web browser, and go to the Skype Web site.
  2. Click the Download link; then click the Skype for Windows link. You see the Skype for Windows Web page.
  3. Click the Skype Web Toolbar link; then click Get It Now.
  4. Decide whether you want to use the default folder to save the Skype Web Toolbar installation file, which is about to be downloaded. It does not matter where you save this file, as long as you remember where it is. Common alternatives to the default location are the Windows Desktop or My Documents folder.
  5. When you are ready to begin downloading the file to your computer, click OK. Downloading this installation file is quick. The file can take from a few seconds to a few minutes to load over a broadband connection.
  6. When the download is complete, close the File Download window, if it is still open; find the Skype toolbar installation file you just downloaded, and double-click it.
  7. Read the Skype license agreement; select I Accept the Agreement; click Next; and continue until the installation is finished.
  8. Close Internet Explorer Mozilla Firefox; then restart your browser. When you restart the browser, you will be notified that another program wants to use Skype, and you will be prompted to authorize the application.
  9. Choose the option Allow This Program to Use Skype All the Time.
  10. Configure the Skype Web Toolbar to select the locale (language), Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox behavior preferences, toolbar buttons, and default search engine.

You are done. Now you're ready to create a new Skype account. Skip to Chapter 4.

Uninstalling Skype from Windows

You can uninstall Skype the same way that you uninstall any Windows software program. Follow these steps:

  1. Choose Start > Control Panel or Settings > Control Panel.
  2. Select Add/Remove Programs.
  3. Select Skype.
  4. Click Remove. The Skype application will be uninstalled.

Installing Skype on Mac OS X

Downloading and installing Skype onto a Mac is simple and straightforward, assuming that you are running Mac OS X 10.3 or newer, have approximately 20MB of free space on your hard drive or main volume, and have a stable connection to the Internet.

To install Skype on your Mac, simply download the Skype application from the Skype Web site, open the mounted downloaded disk image on your Desktop, and then drag the Skype application from the mounted disk image volume to your Applications folder.

Here are the steps for downloading and installing Skype on a Mac using OS X:

  1. Open Safari or your favorite Web browser, and enter www.skype.com in the address bar.
  2. Click the Download link on the Skype Web site; then click any link that is appropriate for Mac OS X to begin downloading Skype Downloading this installation file takes a few minutes. The 7MB file Skype_number.dmg (where number is the version number) can take a little while, depending on the speed of your Internet connection. When downloading is complete, the Skype disk image mounts on the Desktop, and a Finder window opens automatically, revealing the Skype application (see Figure 3-6).
    hmfig3_6.jpg

    Figure 3-6 Mac Finder window

  3. Drag the Skype application to your Applications folder.
  4. Drag the Skype application icon in your Applications folder to your Dock for convenient access to the Skype application.
  5. In the Finder window, click the Eject button next to the mounted volume for Skype to eject the mounted volume from your Desktop. Next, you will need to create a new Skype account to register as a Skype user.
  6. Assuming that your Mac is still connected to the Internet, click the Skype application icon on your Dock or in the Applications folder to launch Skype and begin setting up your Skype account.

Now you're ready to create a new Skype account. Skip to Chapter 4.

Uninstalling Skype from Mac OS X

You can uninstall Skype the same way that you uninstall any Mac OS X software program. To uninstall Skype from your Mac, follow these steps:

  1. Go to the Applications folder.
  2. Select the Skype application icon.
  3. Drag the icon to the Trash.
  4. Empty the Trash. Skype will be uninstalled.

Installing Skype on Windows Mobile-Based Pocket PC

Downloading and installing Skype on a Pocket PC device is not difficult, assuming that you have a broadband Internet connection.

There are two methods for installing Skype on your Pocket PC:

  • Download it directly to the Pocket PC device (preferred method).
  • Download Skype to the PC and then install it on the Pocket PC device.

Downloading Skype to the Pocket PC Device (Preferred Method)

The easiest way to install Skype on a device running Windows Mobile-based Pocket PC is to download the Cab installer for the handheld device directly from the Skype Web site, using the Web browser on the device. Installing Skype this way assumes that your Pocket PC device is able to connect wirelessly to the Internet.

To install Skype on your Pocket PC device using the preferred method, follow these steps:

  1. If you have downloaded and successfully installed applications on your Pocket PC directly from the Internet before, here is the URL for downloading the Cab file: www.skype.com/go/getskype-pocketpc-cab
  2. In the download window, check the Open File after Download checkbox, and click Yes.
  3. Choose Start > File Explorer.
  4. Click the Skype application icon.

Now you're ready to create a new Skype account or log into your existing account, if you have one. Skip to Chapter 4.

Otherwise, here are individual steps for downloading and installing Skype on a device running Pocket PC:

  1. Open Internet Explorer on your Pocket PC device, and enter the following URL in the browser address bar:

    www.skype.com/products/skype/pocketpc/

  2. Click the Cab Installer for Handheld Devices link, and click File Download.

    The download will start.

  3. In the download window, check the Open File after Download checkbox, and click Yes.

    Installation will start automatically immediately after the download is complete.

  4. When the installation is complete, go to Programs on your Pocket PC and click the Skype icon to start using Skype.
  5. Complete the Skype installation by clicking Finish.

Now you're ready to create a new Skype account or log into your existing account, if you have one. Skip to Chapter 4.

Downloading Skype to the PC First (Alternative Method)

Installing Skype on a Pocket PC device by downloading it to a PC requires that you have a broadband connection and have already installed Microsoft ActiveSync on the PC. Refer to your Pocket PC documentation for instructions on how to install and configure ActiveSync.

To install Skype on your PC and then your Pocket PC device, follow these steps:

  1. Download the Skype application from this page on the Skype Web site: www.skype.com/products/skype/pocketpc/
  2. Save the installation file to your PC.
  3. When the file has downloaded completely, open the folder containing the file you downloaded; make sure that your Pocket PC device is connected to your computer with ActiveSync; and then double-click the installation file to start the installation.
  4. Accept the Skype End User License Agreement. The ActiveSync Application Manager will pop up to copy the necessary files to your Pocket PC device.

Uninstalling Skype from Pocket PC

You can uninstall Skype the same way that you uninstall any Pocket PC application:

  1. Choose Start > Settings.
  2. Select the System tab.
  3. Select Remove Programs.
  4. Select Skype.
  5. Click Remove. The Skype application will be uninstalled.

Installing Skype on Linux

To install Skype on your Linux computer, you need to download the Skype application from the Skype Web site; save the rpm package or tar installation file on your hard disk; and then begin the actual installation process.

The process for installing Skype is being updated with each new version of Skype for Linux. Please check the Skype Web site for the most current installation instructions before you begin installing Skype for Linux.

Installing Skype on Linux assumes that:

  • You are familiar with the Linux operating system.
  • You have superuser root privileges on your computer.

If you are unfamiliar with Linux or do not have superuser privileges, consult your system administrator for assistance with downloading, installing, and configuring Skype.

Assuming that you are familiar with Linux, this section will take you through the steps for downloading and installing Skype on a PC running SuSE 9 or newer, Mandrake 10.1 or newer, Fedora Core 3 (Red Hat), or Debian-based Linux distributions.

Here are some other key points that you may want to consider as you prepare to install and configure Skype for Linux:

  • 32-bit/64-bit hardware and OS —Skype is a 32-bit application and is designed to run on i386-32 systems. Skype will run on a 64-bit CPU with a 64-bit version of Linux if you install the appropriate Qt 32-bit compatibility libraries and then run Skype within the 32-bit emulation layer. Refer to the Skype Forums at http://forum.skype.com for more information.
  • KDE/GNOME desktop manager —Skype supports both KDE and Gnome desktop managers.
  • rpm/tar installation process —You can install Skype using either rpm or tar, depending on your Linux distribution.

    rpm provides the most convenient way to install software properly in the specific Linux systems for which the rpm software package was created. rpm stands for Red Hat Package Manager. It is the new standard Linux software package installer that originated with Red Hat Linux.

    For the most current information on using Skype's apt and yum repositories, visit the Web page Skype for Linux Repositories (www.skype.com/products/skype/linux/repositories.html).

    tar, which stands for tape archive, provides a universally accepted method for installing files manually wherever you like on your Linux system. tar is an operating system utility that people use for creating and unpacking compressed data archives.

    • Dynamic binaries work on most Linux distributions as long as Qt version 3.2 or later and glibc 2.2.5 or later are installed. Qt is a graphical widget toolkit for developing programs with a graphical user interface.
    • Static binaries have Qt compiled in and work on almost all distributions, including Red Hat 9. When you use the static binaries, Skype does not integrate automatically with your desktop-manager themes. And in some cases, you may need to install the appropriate dbus libraries, which you can get from your distribution media, the Web site for your Linux distribution, or from http://rpmfind.net. Be aware that you might also need Qt font and other configuration files installed for Skype to work properly.
  • OSS/ALSA sound subsystem —The sound system that Skype supports is the Open Sound System (OSS) standard using /dev/ dsp as its audio input and output device. Skype works fine with the new Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) standard when used in conjunction with the OSS emulation layer.Since the 2.6 release of the Linux kernel, you may need to enable the ALSA driver for your sound card or chip for Skype to work properly. Refer to the ALSA sound card matrix in the online Skype Forums or the Web site for your Linux distribution for the most current information.

Downloading Skype Using Linux

To download Skype to your Linux computer, follow these steps:

  1. Point your favorite Web browser to the Skype Web site.
  2. Click any button or links to download Skype for Linux, including Download. The Skype Downloads page is displayed.
  3. Click the Linux link. The Download Skype for Linux page is displayed. Skype for Linux is available for a variety of Linux distributions, and it is available in both rpm and tar formats.
  4. If you are new to the Linux operating system, find the appropriate rpm installation package for your version of Linux, regardless of whether it is Red Hat. If you are familiar with Linux and have previous experience using command-line tools, you may choose to download either the appropriate rpm installation or the tar file.
  5. To begin downloading, click the appropriate link.
  6. When you are given an opportunity to save the file to disk, do so.
  7. Decide whether you want to use the default folder to save the Skype installation file that is about to be downloaded. By default, in most cases Linux will attempt to save the file in the home directory associated with the account on which you logged in. Downloading this installation file takes a few minutes. The approximately 7MB file can take a little while, depending on the speed of your Internet connection. The specific name of the installation file depends on the operating system distribution and type of installation you selected.
  8. When you are ready to begin downloading the file to your computer, click OK.

When downloading is complete, skip to "Installing Skype with rpm"or "Installing Skype with tar" later in this chapter.

Installing Skype with rpm

The rpm installation process is simple and straightforward, as long as you have superuser root privileges and you are attempting to install Skype in one of the appropriate distributions and versions of Linux.

To install Skype on Linux using rpm, follow these steps:

  1. Log in as the superuser root.
  2. Navigate to the directory where you saved the rpm installation file. If you can't find the file you downloaded, open a terminal window, su to root, and update the list of files on your machine by typing slocate -u Then, at the root prompt #, search for the downloaded file by typing slocate skype-version.rpm
  3. Replace skype-version.rpm with the specific name of the file you downloaded. See the Skype for Linux Download Web page for the name of the file. Alternatively, you can use the find command at the root prompt # search for the downloaded file by typing find / -name skype-version.rpm -print Again, you need to replace skype-version.rpm with the specific name of the file you downloaded. See the Skype for Linux Download Web page for the name of the file.
  4. Navigate to the directory where the slocate or find command found the Skype installation file, and begin the installation process by typing the following command: rpm -Uvh skype-version.rpm Replace skype-version.rpm with the name of the file you downloaded—for example, skype-0_90_0_1.rpm. The -U flag tells the rpm command to install Skype and then delete any previously installed copies of the program. The -vh flag causes the system to display all installation messages to your monitor.

Installing Skype with tar

The installation process using tar is straightforward, as long as you have superuser root privileges and you are attempting to install Skype in one of the appropriate distributions and versions of Linux.

To install Skype on Linux using tar, follow these steps:

  1. Log in as the superuser root.
  2. cd to the directory where you saved the tar file.
  3. Enter the following command: tar -xjvf skype-version.tar.bz2 Replace skype-version.tar.bz2 with the name of the file you downloaded, such as skype-0_90_0_1.tar.bz2. Skype is unpacked to the current directory.

Configuring Linux for Skype

The following sections present several essential configuration changes you can make to optimize your chances of success using Skype with Linux.

Run Skype with ALSA in OSS Emulation Mode

The recommended way to run Skype is with ALSA in OSS emulation mode.

This is because Skype relies on OSS and on being able to run in full-duplex mode. Most OSS drivers do not support full-duplex communication, however. As a result, they will crash the KDE artsd (Advanced Real-Time Synthesizer sound daemon) if you try to enable the driver to operate in full-duplex mode.

Be aware that you cannot enable both OSS and ALSA. You must disable OSS and then enable ALSA with OSS emulation. If, however, you choose to use an older OSS driver (and not the ALSA driver in OSS emulation mode), you may need to configure the driver to allow full-duplex communication.

Refer to Appendix C and the Unofficial Skype + Linux Sound FAQ on the Skype Forums for more information on configuring ALSA for OSS emulation.

Set Nonblocking Mode in modules.conf

The default behavior for OSS is that the sound device is opened in blocking mode, which gives the application exclusive access to the device. Blocking mode can cause problems under certain circumstances. You can reconfigure ALSA to allow applications to open the sound device in nonblocking mode by appending the following command to your modules.conf file:

options snd-pcm-oss nonblock_open=1

Start Skype Using KDE

If you plan to use the KDE desktop manager and have enabled system sound, you may need to edit your kmenu entry to make sure that when Skype launches, you can still play music and make calls at the same time.

To do this, edit your kmenu entry, and make sure that it contains this command:

artsdsp -m /usr/bin/skype

The -m option tells the system to use MMAP for memory-mapped sound.

For artsdsp to work properly with Skype, you may need to turn on full-duplex mode. To do this, choose Sound & Multimedia > Sound System. On the Hardware tab, make sure that the Full Duplex checkbox is checked and that the mixer is not muted.

Verify Permissions for /dev/dsp

You can avoid the most common Skype installation problem by verifying that the permissions for /dev/dsp are set to read and write for the user who will be using Skype.

Disable the Capture Channel on the Sound Card (or Chip)

Some sound cards and chips have a Capture channel set by default. To avoid hearing echoes on your calls, you may need to disable this Capture channel by starting your sound-mixer application and muting the capture channel.

Run Skype on a Proxied Network

Skype for Linux might not connect if the Skype application is running on a proxied network. Skype supports regular HTTP or HTTPS proxies and authenticating HTTPS/SSL and SOCKS5 proxies. Skype for Linux automatically looks for proxy settings in Opera configuration files. You can set the appropriate environment variable http_proxy or https_proxy to point to the proxy (host:port).

Uninstalling Skype from Linux

You can uninstall Skype the same way that you uninstall any Linux software program, depending on how the application was installed:

  • If you used tar to install Skype, you can remove the Skype application and its associated directories with the rm command.
  • If you installed Skype with rpm, you may want to refer to the documentation for your particular Linux distribution for specific instructions.

Uninstalling Skype with tar

If you installed Skype with tar, uninstalling it requires great caution because you need to use the rm command, possibly as the superuser (root).

Because Skype has a daemon that runs as a background process, it is best to stop it before attempting to uninstall Skype.

To stop the process, first you must identify the process identification number. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Log in as the user who is running Skype, and type ps -aux | grep skype
  2. When you have found the Linux process identification for the Skype application, kill the process by issuing the following command: kill -9 skype_process_ID where skype_process_ID is the process identification number associated with Skype.
  3. Change directories to the directory where tar was originally executed to install Skype. In other words, cd to the directory directly above the Skype directory.
  4. When you are absolutely certain that you are in the correct directory, enter the following command to remove the Skype subdirectory and associated files forcefully: rm -rf skype-directory where skype-directory is the specific name of the directory in which Skype is installed.

Uninstalling Skype with rpm

If you installed Skype with rpm, uninstalling it is simple. You may want to check the man page for rpm on your Linux distribution to make sure that there is nothing special you need to know.

Because Skype has a daemon that runs as a background process, it is best to stop it before attempting to uninstall Skype. To stop the process, first you must identify the process identification number. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Log in as the user who is running Skype, and type ps -aux | grep skype
  2. When you have found the Linux process identification number for the Skype application, kill the process by issuing the following command: kill -9 skype_process_ID where skype_process_ID is the process identification number associated with Skype.
  3. Enter the following command to uninstall the Skype application software: rpm -e skype_package.rpm where skype_package is the specific name of the rpm package that installed Skype—for example, skype-0_90_0_1.rpm.
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