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Included in the box is a 64MB flash card, augmenting the device's 128MB of internal flash storage shared by the OS and user documents. Also included is a spare stylus, a thoughtful touch — I have come close to losing my stylus several times this week.

In some cases, the machine may seem underpowered. The internal memory available is 64MB. Of this, about half is used by the basic environment. Launching the browser uses up another 12MB, and loading a reasonable-sized page can take this up to 20MB or so. A couple of browser windows and a PDF viewer later, the device has slowed to a crawl. Task switching can take several minutes.

It seems that when RAM is short, CPU usage shoots up, taxing the 200MHz ARM processor. When in this state, it has a habit of closing programs to free memory — unfortunately mine seems to have a habit of picking on Notes, the text editing application, and closing it in a way that causes it not to save the most recent changes.

A good way of getting it out of this state is to close an application or two yourself. Unfortunately, if the application is not responding, there is no way of doing this. Nokia didn't see fit to include a kill command. Fortunately, there is a third-party terminal app available for download from the developers' site which gives access to the traditional UNIX kill -9.

A slightly dubious design decision was to use RS-MMCs for expandable storage. While these are becoming standard in mobile phones, they are still lower capacity and more expensive than full size MMCs, which are still small enough not to add bulk to the device.

Nokia claims a 3 hour battery life while browsing. Two hours reading an eBook used less than a quarter of the battery — I then used the device for much of the rest of the day without completely flattening it. On other occasions, however, the battery flattened very quickly without much use. It seems to follow the same inscrutable discharge patterns as mobile phone batteries.

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