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The BTM Maturity Model measures a firm’s progress

Given the interconnectedness of the 17 capabilities and the importance of approaching them on a clear priority basis, it is critical that an organization understand its maturity relating to them. The BTM Maturity Model (see Figure 1.5) defines five levels of maturity, scored across the four critical dimensions described previously: process, organization, information, and technology.

Figure 1.5

Figure 1.5 The BTM Maturity Model

The BTM Maturity Model identifies areas most in need of improvement, fixes the starting point for the enterprise, and specifies the path for change.

A maturity model describes how well an enterprise performs a particular set of activities in comparison to a prescribed standard. This instrument assists in levying a grade based on objective, best practice characteristics. A maturity model also makes it possible for an enterprise to identify anomalies in performance and benchmark itself against other companies or across industries. The measurement of BTM capabilities through the BTM Maturity Model identifies areas most in need of improvement, fixes the starting point for the enterprise, and specifies the path for change.

A growing body of BTM Institute and Enamics research shows that at level 1, enterprises typically execute some strategic business technology management processes in a disaggregated, task-like manner. A level 2 organization exhibits limited BTM capabilities, attempts to assemble information for major decisions, and consults IT on decisions with obvious business technology implications. Enterprises at level 3 are "functional" with respect to BTM, and those at level 4 have BTM fully implemented. Organizations achieving level 5 maturity are good enough to know when to change the rules to maintain strategic advantages over competitors who themselves may be getting the hang of BTM.

The evidence shows that enterprises at lower levels of maturity will score lower for business technology productivity, responsiveness, and project success than enterprises at higher levels. As BTM maturity extends past level 3, the resulting synchrony of business strategy and technology delivery makes the enterprise more agile and adaptable. For such companies, changes in the business landscape impel appropriate adjustments to strategy and corresponding action without major disruptions or anguish. Emerging opportunities are sensed and addressed more quickly. Project execution to deliver new capabilities is more sure-footed. As joint management of business and technology improves, the maturity of the enterprise is reassessed to focus the next set of priorities. As gains result from BTM, remaining weaknesses become more obvious and the business case for addressing them becomes more compelling.

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