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This chapter is from the book

What Is a Rootkit?

The term rootkit has been around for more than 10 years. A rootkit is a "kit" consisting of small and useful programs that allow an attacker to maintain access to "root," the most powerful user on a computer. In other words, a rootkit is a set of programs and code that allows a permanent or consistent, undetectable presence on a computer.

In our definition of "rootkit," the key word is "undetectable." Most of the technology and tricks employed by a rootkit are designed to hide code and data on a system. For example, many rootkits can hide files and directories. Other features in a rootkit are usually for remote access and eavesdropping—for instance, for sniffing packets from the network. When combined, these features deliver a knockout punch to security.

Rootkits are not inherently "bad," and they are not always used by the "bad guys." It is important to understand that a rootkit is just a technology. Good or bad intent derives from the humans who use them. There are plenty of legitimate commercial programs that provide remote administration and even eavesdropping features. Some of these programs even use stealth. In many ways, these programs could be called rootkits. Law enforcement may use the term "rootkit" to refer to a sanctioned back-door program—something installed on a target with legal permission from the state, perhaps via court order. (We cover such uses in the section Legitimate Uses of Rootkits later in this chapter.) Large corporations also use rootkit technology to monitor and enforce their computer-use regulations.

By taking the attacker's perspective, we guide you through your enemies' skills and techniques. This will increase your skills in defending against the rootkit threat. If you are a legitimate developer of rootkit technology, this book will help you build a base of skills that you can expand upon.

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