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This chapter is from the book

This chapter is from the book

Site Replication Service Configuration

When you install the first Exchange 2003 server in a site, the Exchange Setup program initializes the SRS. This service maintains a copy of the legacy Exchange directory service that it can replicate with legacy servers in the site, as shown in Figure 12.40.

12fig40.gifFigure 12.40 Site Replication Service allows Exchange 2003 server to participate in legacy Exchange directory service replication to simplify Connection Agreement connections.legacy Exchange serversmigration to Exchange 2003SRS configurationmigration from legacy Exchangeinstallation of Exchange 2003SRS configurationSRS (Site Replication Service)configuringinstallingExchange Server 2003SRS configuration

SRS acts as an endpoint for the Configuration Connection Agreement created in the ADC by Exchange Setup. This allows SRS to funnel organizational changes made in Active Directory into the legacy Exchange directory service, where they propagate to the legacy servers via standard directory service replication.

It's important to keep in mind that the SRS does not replicate directly to Active Directory. You still need the ADC to move data to and from Active Directory and the legacy Exchange directory service. The SRS simply makes it possible to home the Exchange side of a Connection Agreement to an Exchange 2003 server.

You should manually change the endpoints of Recipient and Public Folder CAs to point at SRS rather than a legacy Exchange server. In this way, you can decommission your legacy servers without losing synchronization with Active Directory.

SRS does not run as a clustered resource. Because the first Exchange 2003 server in a site must run SRS, you cannot install the first Exchange 2003 server in a site on a cluster. Install at least one standalone Exchange 2003 server to act as SRS and then install Exchange on the cluster. (This was also true for Exchange 2000.)

Managing the SRS Directory

You cannot manage the content of the SRS directory directly from Exchange System Manager. It's a legacy directory service, so you need a copy of Admin, the legacy Exchange administration utility.

You can use Admin from another Exchange server or you can install it on your Exchange 2003 server (or management workstation) using an Exchange Setup option. Figure 12.41 shows the option.

12fig41.gifFigure 12.41 Installing the legacy Admin tool on an Exchange 2003 server allows you to manage an SRS databases and legacy Exchange servers.SRS (Site Replication Service)directory managementinstallingExchange Server 2003SRS configuration;directory management

Installing the legacy Admin tool also comes in handy because you can manage other legacy servers in addition to the SRS server. You do not need to run SRS to load the Admin tool.

Configuring New SRS Servers

Exchange Setup installs SRS on every Exchange 2003 server, but only initializes the service on the first Exchange 2003 server in a legacy site. You can see the servers running SRS in ESM by drilling down to Tools | Site Replication Services. Figure 12.42 shows an example.

12fig42.gifFigure 12.42 ESM showing SRS servers. Each site with a legacy Exchange server and an Exchange 2003 server must have an SRS server.legacy Exchange serversmigration to Exchange 2003SRS configurationmigration from legacy Exchangeinstallation of Exchange 2003SRS configurationSRS (Site Replication Service)configuring new serversinstallingExchange Server 2003SRS configuration

You can use ESM to start SRS on additional servers if you want to transfer Connection Agreement endpoints to another Exchange 2003 server. You must run ESM on the console of the server where you want to initialize SRS (or in a remote desktop session connected to the server).

  1. Right-click the Site Replication Services icon and select New | Site Replication Service from the flyout menu.

  2. A popup window asks if you are sure you want to start the service. Click Yes to acknowledge.

  3. The Initial SRS Replication window opens, offering you a choice of which legacy server or SRS server to replicate from during the initial population of the local directory service database. Figure 12.43 shows an example. Select a server and click OK. The Site Replication Service logon window opens, as shown in Figure 12.44.

    12fig43.gifFigure 12.43 When creating a new SRS server, you can select the legacy server or the SRS server from which to pull initial replication.legacy Exchange serversmigration to Exchange 2003SRS configurationmigration from legacy Exchangeinstallation of Exchange 2003SRS configurationSRS (Site Replication Service)configuring new serversinstallingExchange Server 2003SRS configuration

    12fig44.gifFigure 12.44 SRS logon window allows you to enter the credentials of the legacy Exchange service account.

  4. Enter the password for the Exchange service account used by the SRS.

Exchange now starts SRS on the server, initializes the legacy directory service database, and joins the replication topology of the site. You can now rehome Connection Agreements to the server as described in the next section.

Changing Connection Agreement Endpoints

When the CA Wizard first creates the Recipient and Public Folder Connection Agreements, it selects a legacy Exchange server in each site to act as the endpoint for the CA. To keep from changing the CA endpoints from one legacy server to the next as you decommission them, rehome the CA endpoints to an SRS server and be done with it.

Change the endpoint of a CA using the Properties window for the Connection Agreement in the ADC Services console.

  1. Select the Connections tab.

  2. Change the server name in the Exchange Server Information field from the legacy Exchange server to the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) of the SRS server in that site.

  3. Important. Change the port number from 389 to 379. The SRS service listens for LDAP queries on port 379. This permits SRS to coexist with Active Directory if you run Exchange 2003 on a domain controller.

  4. When prompted that the change requires a full replication, click OK to acknowledge.

  5. Verify that the Connection Agreement operates correctly by making a small change in Active Directory and then manually running the CA to see if the change replicates to legacy Exchange.

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