Home > Articles > Home & Office Computing > Mac OS X

  • Print
  • + Share This
Like this article? We recommend

Like this article? We recommend

Mail

Now it's time to move the mail from ASIP to Cyrus on OS X Server. This is going to be a problem. Apple had a chance to make it easier—in fact, they did make it easier in Jaguar—but the AppleShare IP Migration utility flat-out didn't work for me in shifting mail from ASIP to OS X. It also failed silently, without any clue as to the problem and a possible solution.

Fortunately, after a pointer from someone at AFP458.com, I checked the logs and discovered that the Migration tool was trying to run an application (hidden inside the Migration utility) that was no longer there, exactly as my informant had had reported in his logs. While attempting to run down and fix the problem, I discovered that several other administrators had run into the same problem—so don't be surprised when the utility doesn't shift your mail.

There is help at hand, however. Stalker Communications' CommuniGate Pro includes a number of tools to simplify shifting mail from one server to another. Download CommuniGate Pro, unpack it, and install it. I installed on a client machine in case I couldn't get the software off again, but there's no real need to worry; CommuniGate Pro also provides an uninstall shell script that works perfectly.

You'll also need a list of all users and their passwords. AppleShare Password Instant Dumper (ASPID) will create this list for you, though it gives you too much information. I imported the file into a spreadsheet, deleted the columns that weren't needed, and exported the file again. Once you have your list, consult the Stalker site for some good instructions on using the tools.

Even this process may not go without problems. A few of my mail accounts wouldn't shift using these tools and had to be moved by hand—the perfect task for the most junior member of the IT team. I ran the MoveIMAPMail tool, noted the account that stopped the process, and shortened the list up to and including the problem account; then I ran it again. I only had to repeat this technique a few times. (It's fortunate that I was committed to this approach, as by coincidence the first account in the list caused a problem, and I almost gave up on the spot.) I tried to work out the common denominator across the accounts that broke, but couldn't figure it out.

  • + Share This
  • 🔖 Save To Your Account