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The New Celerons: Not Like the Old Celerons

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The New Celerons: Not Like the Old Celerons

Before you buy a Celeron-based system, find out exactly which Celeron you are considering.

The name Celeron is the general name that Intel has used for its economy line of processors going all the way back to the Pentium II. In short, a Celeron is a Pentium II, Pentium III, or Pentium 4 processor with some features reduced or removed. Celerons are basically designed as less expensive, stripped down, economy versions of Intel's main processors. While the specific details have varied over the years, Celerons have normally differed from Intels Pentium II, Pentium III or current Pentium 4 processors in the following ways:

  • Lower CPU clock speeds

  • Lower CPU bus speeds

  • Reduced size L2 cache

While these differences have made Celeron processors less powerful than the particular Pentium II/III/4 they are based on, they also make Celeron processors and Celeron-based systems less expensive. If youre looking for a low-cost system thats "Intel inside", a Celeron-based system is one way to get there.

History of the Celeron

The original Celerons were economy versions of the Intel Pentium II processor. Intel figured that by taking a Pentium II and deleting the separate L2 cache chips that were mounted inside the processor cartridge (and also deleting the cosmetic cover), they could create a "new" processor that was basically just a slower version of the Pentium II. As such the first 266MHz and 300MHz Celeron models didnt include any level 2 cache. Unfortunately this proved to have far too great a crippling effect on performance, so starting with the 300A versions, the Celeron received 128KB of on-die full-speed L2 cache, which was actually faster and more advanced than the 512KB of half-speed cache used in the Pentium II it was based on! In fact the Celeron was the first PC processor to receive on-die L2 cache. It wasn't until the Coppermine version of the Pentium III appeared that on-die L2 cache migrated to Intel's main processors.

Needless to say, this caused a lot of confusion in the marketplace about the Celeron. Considering that the Celeron started out as a "crippled" Pentium II, and then was revised so as to actually be superior in some ways to the Pentium II on which it was based (all while selling for less) many didn't know just where the Celeron stood in terms of performance. Fortunately the crippling lack of L2 cache existed only in the earliest Celeron versions, all of those at speeds greater than 300MHz have on-die full-speed L2 cache.

The earliest Celerons from 266MHz up through 400MHz were produced in a SEPP (single edge processor package) design which physically looked like a circuit board and which was designed to fit into Slot 1. This is the same slot the Pentium II used, meaning the Celeron SEPP would plug into any Pentium II Slot-1 motherboard.As the Celeron continued to develop, the form factor was changed to correspond with changes in the Pentium II, III, and 4-class processors from which it was adapted. Starting with the 300A processor (300MHz Celeron with 128KB of on-die Level 2 cache), Celerons were produced in a PPGA (plastic pin grid array) package using the Socket 370 interface. This socket, with differences in voltage, was later used by most versions of the Pentium III. Celerons using Socket 370 range in speed from 300MHz all the way up to 1.4GHz. Along the way the packaging changed from PPGA to FC-PGA (flip-chip pin grid array) and FC-PGA2. The latter added a protective metal heat spreader on top of the fragile die.

The latest Celerons are based on Pentium 4 processors. They are produced in an FC-PGA2 package that fits into the same Socket 478 that recent Pentium 4 processors use; the Celeron was never produced in the short-lived Socket 423 form factor used by the original Pentium 4 processors.

As this brief history shows, the name "Celeron" has never meant anything more specific than a reduced performance version of Intel's current mainstream processor. Before you can decide if a particular Celeron processor is a suitable choice, you need to know what its features are, and especially what processor it is based upon. There are a total of 7 discrete variations of the Celeron processor, which are detailed in the following table:

Celeron Version Celeron Celeron A Celeron A-PGA Celeron III Celeron IIIA Celeron 4 Celeron 4A
Based on Pentium II Deschutes Pentium II Deschutes Pentium II Deschutes Pentium III Coppermine Pentium III Tualatin Pentium 4 Willamette Pentium 4 Northwood
Codename Covington Mendocino Mendocino Coppermine-128 Tualatin-256 Willamette-128 Northwood-256
Process (micron) 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.18 0.13 0.18 0.13
L2 Cache (KB) 0 128 128 128 256 128 256
Multi-Media Support MMX MMX MMX SSE SSE SSE2 SSE2
Physical Interface Slot-1 Slot-1 Socket 370 Socket 370 Socket 370 Socket 478 Socket 478
Package SEPP SEPP PPGA FC-PGA FC-PGA2 FC-PGA2 FC-PGA2
CPU Bus Speed 66 MHz 66 MHz 66 MHz 66/100 MHz* 100 MHz 400 MHz 400 MHz
Min. Speed 266 MHz 300A MHz 300A MHz 533A MHz 900 MHz 1.7 GHz 2.0A GHz
Max. Speed 300 MHz 433 MHz 533 MHz 1.1 GHz 1.4 GHz 2.0 GHz 2.1 GHz
  • *All Celeron III below 800 MHz use 66 MHz CPU bus, all Celeron III from 800 MHz through 1.1 GHz use 100 MHz bus.
  • SEPP = Single Edge Processor Package
  • FC-PGA = Flip Chip Pin Grid Array
  • FC-PGA2 = FC-PGA with added heat spreader
  • MMX = Multimedia extensions, 57 additional instructions for graphics and sound processing
  • SSE = Streaming SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data) Extensions, MMX plus 70 additional instructions for graphics and sound processing
  • SSE2 = Streaming SIMD Extensions 2, SSE plus 144 additional instructions for graphics and sound processing
  • The "Celeron Version" names listed here are not official; I made them up as a way to clearly identify the different Celeron processors.
  • The Celeron 4A version is not out yet, but will be introduced during the 3rd quarter of 2002.
  • Minimum and Maximum speeds indicate the slowest and fastest rated speeds of each variation offered.

The following figures show the different Celeron package types. These images are included courtesy of Intel.

Celeron/Celeron A SEPP (Slot-1):

Celeron A-PGA PPGA (Socket 370):

Celeron III FC-PGA (Socket 370):

Celeron IIIA FC-PGA2 (Socket 370):

Celeron 4 FC-PGA2 (Socket 478):

As you can see, there is a wide range of what is called a "Celeron", and in fact you could consider the Celeron as a family of 6 different core processor models in 5 different package variations. The Celeron IIIA and Celeron 4 are soon to be joined by the upcoming Celeron 4A version. All previous versions have been or are in the process of being discontinued.

The following sections discuss the differences between these different Celeron processors.Socket 370 versus Socket 478 Celerons

While both Socket 370 and Socket 478 processors bear the name "Celeron", there are enormous differences in internal design between Celeron processors in these form factors. These differences directly relate to which Intel Pentium-class processor a particular Celeron processor is based upon.

Socket 370 Celerons are based on various versions of the Pentium II and Pentium III architecture, while Socket 478 Celerons are based on the Pentium 4 architecture. This discussion focuses on the Celeron IIIA, Celeron 4, and Celeron 4A (previous versions have been discontinued).

Intel offers Celeron IIIA versions for new Socket 370 motherboards in speeds from 900 MHz to 1.4 GHz, Celeron 4 versions for Socket 478 motherboards in speeds from 1.7GHz to 1.8GHz (with 2.0 GHz coming); and faster Celeron 4A models in speeds from 2.0A GHz to 2.1 GHz are expected to arrive later this year.

What are the differences in these processors, other than clock speed?

  • All Celeron IIIA Celerons have a CPU bus (sometimes called FSB or front-side-bus) speed of 100MHz, while all Socket 478 Celerons have a CPU bus speed of 400MHz.
  • Celeron IIIA versions that are based on the Pentium III Tualatin core have 256KB of Level 2 cache, while those based on the earlier Pentium III Coppermine core or Pentium II Deschutes core have 128KB of Level 2 cache. All current Socket 478 Celerons based on the Pentium 4 Willamette core have 128KB of Level 2 cache, and newer versions based on the Northwood core are coming with 256KB of L2 cache.

How Tualatin, Willamette and Northwood Improve the Celeron

Compared to Celerons based on the previous Pentium III Coppermine core, Tualatin-based Celerons have the following differences:

  • Larger L2 memory cache (256KB versus 128KB)
  • Improved L2 cache design for better performance
  • FC-PGA2 packaging which includes a metal heat spreader over the fragile CPU core to protect it when attaching a heatsink

However, these improvements come at a cost in compatibility. Like the Tualatin-core versions of the Pentium III, Celerons based on the Tualatin core wont work in motherboards designed for older Pentium III or Celeron chips. While Socket 370 is physically the same, the Tualatin core redefines ten pins in the socket, which require corresponding changes in the chipset and motherboard. So, if youre looking for a way to speed up an older Celeron by installing a Tualatin-core Celeron IIIA, make sure the motherboard is "Tualatin-ready". Also note that Tualatin-core Celerons use the FC-PGA2 packaging, which includes a heat spreader on top of the CPU die. This requires a compatible heat sink.

Because of the variations in packaging, which require different heat sink solutions, I normally recommend only purchasing "boxed" versions of the processors, which include a compatible high quality heat sink in the box. That way you are assured of having the proper heat sink, clips, thermal interface material, and other items necessary to assure the chip will operate properly and safely in your system. The boxed processors also feature a 3-year warranty direct with Intel, which is not available with raw or "OEM" processors.

The following figure shows a "boxed" Celeron III processor:

The latest Celeron 4 processors are designed to provide a low-cost alternative to users of Socket 478 motherboards (the form factor used by recent and current Pentium 4 processors). Socket 478 Celerons currently use the Willamette core found in the original Pentium 4, but newer Celeron 4A versions will soon be released that use the Northwood core found in the latest Pentium 4 models. The only difference between a Celeron 4 or 4A and the Pentium 4 or Pentium 4A processors they are based on is that the Celeron versions have only half of the L2 cache as found in the corresponding Pentium 4 version. Compared to earlier Pentium III-based Celerons, the Pentium 4-based Celerons have the following improvements:

  • Faster clock speeds (up to 2.1GHz by early 2003 and climbing)
  • 400MHz CPU bus for data and memory transfers up to 3.2GB/second (depending upon the memory used on the motherboard)
  • Support for SSE2 instructions, which include the SSE (Streaming SIMD Extension) instructions found in the Pentium III based Celerons plus 144 additional instructions for graphics and sound processing
  • Deeper 20-stage internal pipeline
  • 256-bit wide L2 cache
  • All other Pentium 4 architectural features

Celerons with the Willamette-128 core have half the L2 cache found in the Pentium 4 Willamette processors, and Celerons with the Northwood-256 core have half of the L2 cache found in the Pentium 4 Northwood processors. Even though the Celeron 4 processors have only 128KB of L2 cache, the improvements in the cache architecture and CPU and bus speeds allow them to far outperform the previous Celeron IIIA versions with 256KB of L2. The upcoming Northwood based Celeron 4A will have 256KB of L2 and will perform even better than the current Celeron 4.

Essentially, you can consider the latest Celerons as economy versions of the Pentium 4, ready to plug into any Socket 478 motherboard as a lower-cost, lower-performance alternative to the "real" Pentium 4.

Visual Clues as to Whos Who

Fortunately, the external design of the different Celeron IIIA and newer processors makes it fairly easy to tell which processor is which.

All of the Celeron IIIA Tualatin-128 core Socket 370 Celeron chips (256KB of level 2 cache) use Intels FC-PGA2 design. This design adds a metal heat spreader to the top of the processor to improve heat transfer to the heatsink. This integrated heat spreader also prevents physical damage to the CPU during the processor and heat sink installation. Think of it as a metal protective cap over the CPU die.

All Pentium 4 based, Socket 478 Celerons also use FC-PGA2, but can be distinguished from Tualatin-based Celerons by the size of the processor: Socket 478 processors are actually smaller than Socket 370 processors, even though they have more pins. The smaller size is due to the fact that the pins are staggered in a grid with much closer spacing than on the previous designs.

Quick Reference Table for The Latest Celerons

Because Intel has offered Celerons in as many as seven distinctive variations, its easy to get confused as to which is which, or which was available at a specific speed. The following table lists every Celeron version released to date, which will help you keep the different models straight.

Celeron Version

Processor Speed

CPU Bus Speed

L2 Cache

Multi-Media Support

Package

Physical Interface

sSpec

Celeron 4

1.80 GHz

400 MHz

128KB

SSE2

FC-PGA2

Socket 478

SL6A2

Celeron 4

1.80 GHz

400 MHz

128KB

SSE2

FC-PGA2

Socket 478

SL68D

Celeron 4

1.70 GHz

400 MHz

128KB

SSE2

FC-PGA2

Socket 478

SL69Z

Celeron IIIA

1.40 GHz

100 MHz

256KB

SSE

FC-PGA2

Socket 370

SL68G

Celeron IIIA

1.30 GHz

100 MHz

256KB

SSE

FC-PGA2

Socket 370

SL5ZJ

Celeron IIIA

1.30 GHz

100 MHz

256KB

SSE

FC-PGA2

Socket 370

SL5VR

Celeron IIIA

1.20 GHz

100 MHz

256KB

SSE

FC-PGA2

Socket 370

SL5Y5

Celeron IIIA

1.20 GHz

100 MHz

256KB

SSE

FC-PGA2

Socket 370

SL5XS

Celeron IIIA

1.10A GHz

100 MHz

256KB

SSE

FC-PGA2

Socket 370

SL5ZE

Celeron IIIA

1.10A GHz

100 MHz

256KB

SSE

FC-PGA2

Socket 370

SL5VQ

Celeron III

1.10 GHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5XU

Celeron III

1.10 GHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5XR

Celeron IIIA

1.0A GHz

100 MHz

256KB

SSE

FC-PGA2

Socket 370

SL5ZF

Celeron IIIA

1.0A GHz

100 MHz

256KB

SSE

FC-PGA2

Socket 370

SL5VP

Celeron III

1.0 GHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL635

Celeron III

1.0 GHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5XT

Celeron III

1.0 GHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5XQ

Celeron IIIA

950 MHz

100 MHz

256KB

SSE

FC-PGA2

Socket 370

SL634

Celeron III

950 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5V2

Celeron III

950 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5UZ

Celeron IIIA

900 MHz

100 MHz

256KB

SSE

FC-PGA2

Socket 370

SL633

Celeron III

900 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5WY

Celeron III

900 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5MQ

Celeron III

900 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5LX

Celeron III

850 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5WX

Celeron III

850 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5GB

Celeron III

850 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5GA

Celeron III

850 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5EC

Celeron III

850 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL54Q

Celeron III

800 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5WW

Celeron III

800 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5WC

Celeron III

800 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5EB

Celeron III

800 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL55R

Celeron III

800 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL54P

Celeron III

800 MHz

100 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4TF

Celeron III

766 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL5EA

Celeron III

766 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL52X

Celeron III

766 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4QF

Celeron III

766 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4P6

Celeron III

733 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL52Y

Celeron III

733 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4P7

Celeron III

733 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4P3

Celeron III

700 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4P8

Celeron III

700 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4P2

Celeron III

700 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4E6

Celeron III

700 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL48F

Celeron III

667 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4P9

Celeron III

667 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4NZ

Celeron III

667 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4AB

Celeron III

667 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL48E

Celeron III

633 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4PA

Celeron III

633 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4NY

Celeron III

633 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL3W9

Celeron III

633 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL3VS

Celeron III

600 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4PB

Celeron III

600 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4NX

Celeron III

600 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL46U

Celeron III

600 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL3W8

Celeron III

566 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4PC

Celeron III

566 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL4NW

Celeron III

566 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL46T

Celeron III

566 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL3W7

Celeron III

533A MHz

66 MHz

128KB

SSE

FC-PGA

Socket 370

SL46S

Celeron A-PGA

533 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL3PZ

Celeron A-PGA

533 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL3FZ

Celeron A-PGA

500 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL3LQ

Celeron A-PGA

500 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL3FY

Celeron A-PGA

466 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL3FL

Celeron A-PGA

466 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL3EH

Celeron A-PGA

433 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL3BS

Celeron A-PGA

433 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL3BA

Celeron A-PGA

400 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL3A2

Celeron A

400 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL39Z

Celeron A-PGA

400 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL37X

Celeron A

400 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL37V

Celeron A

366 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL37Q

Celeron A

366 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL376

Celeron A-PGA

366 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL36C

Celeron A-PGA

366 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL35S

Celeron A-PGA

333 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL36B

Celeron A-PGA

333 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL35R

Celeron A

333 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL32B

Celeron A

333 MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL2WN

Celeron A-PGA

300A MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL36A

Celeron A-PGA

300A MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

PPGA

Socket 370

SL35Q

Celeron A

300A MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL32A

Celeron A

300A MHz

66 MHz

128KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL2WM

Celeron

300 MHz

66 MHz

0KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL2Z7

Celeron

300 MHz

66 MHz

0KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL2YP

Celeron

300 MHz

66 MHz

0KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL2Y2

Celeron

300 MHz

66 MHz

0KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL2X8

Celeron

300 MHz

66 MHz

0KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL27Z

Celeron

266 MHz

66 MHz

0KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL2YN

Celeron

266 MHz

66 MHz

0KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL2TR

Celeron

266 MHz

66 MHz

0KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL2SY

Celeron

266 MHz

66 MHz

0KB

MMX

SEPP

Slot-1

SL2QG

The sSpec values listed here can be found printed on the chip for reference. By reading the sSpec number off a chip and looking the number up on the Intel developer website, you can find out the exact voltage, stepping, and other information in addition to what is listed here.

Which Celeron for You?

If you want to upgrade an older Socket 370-based system, Celeron III versions based on the original Pentium III design can be useful upgrades. However, since they have been discontinued their supply is drying up. For example, the online TC Computers store recently offered just one model, a 1GHz version, for about $77.

The Celeron IIIA processors with the Tualatin-128 core enable you to build a low-cost system based on Tualatin-compatible motherboards or upgrade a system with a slower processor. Keep in mind that older Socket 370 motherboards might not work with Tualatin-core processors; check with the motherboard vendor for details. However, if you can use the Tualatin core and dont mind running the CPU and memory bus at 100MHz instead of 133MHz, youll save a lot of money with a Celeron over a Pentium III. For example, TC Computers recently offered a 1.3GHz Tualatin-based Celeron for about $90, compared to about $245 for a 1.26GHz Pentium III Tualatin.

However, if youre looking to the long term, you should consider the Pentium 4 based Socket 478 versions of Celeron instead. Since Intel has abandoned the Pentium III architecture and Socket 370 along with it, the present and foreseeable future is Socket 478 and motherboards that use the newer Pentium 4 architecture.

The latest Celeron 4 versions are much less expensive than Pentium 4 processors. For example, TC Computers recently offered 1.7GHz boxed Celeron 4 processors (Socket 478) for about $99, while the 1.8GHz boxed Pentium 4 also using Socket 478 was offered for about $190 to $200.

Since current Celeron 4 processors have 128KB of Level 2 cache, compared to 256KB or 512KB in the Pentium 4 processors, theyll perform some tasks more slowly. The new Celeron 4A processors that are coming shortly will narrow the gap. However, if you want to build a Pentium 4-ready system today at a low cost, the Celeron 4 processors based on the Pentium 4 make it possible.

For Further Research

Celeron Information

Look up the official specifications and documentation for the Celeron at:

http://developer.intel.com/design/celeron

Click on the Processor Spec Finder and select your processor model, clock speed, packaging type, and core clock speed for more information.

You can also download Intels Processor Specification Updates for Socket 370 and Socket 478 Celerons show you how to identify them visually and how different models vary internally (voltage, cache size, and other factors).

You can learn much more about all of the Processors in my new book "Upgrading and Repairing PCs, 14th edition". In the near future, you will also find a great deal of useful information on the subject presented visually in my new Upgrading and Repairing PCs Video Training Course.

See more about my latest books and videos at:
http://www.upgradingandrepairingpcs.com/books_by_scott/

Shopping and Price Comparisons

Do your own price comparisons between Celerons and Pentium III or Pentium 4 processors at:

http://www.tccomputers.com

http://www.aberdeeninc.com

Copyright©2002 Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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