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Exam Prep Questions

  1. You are a desktop support technician, and you support computers running Windows XP in a Windows Server 2003 domain. Domain policy explicitly prohibits using Windows Explorer burn CDs. However, Mary Ann is able to burn a CD. What is the most likely reason?

    1. Mary Ann is using a third-party application to create or modify CDs using a CD writer.

    2. Mary Ann is using Internet Explorer to create a CD.

    3. Mary Ann is a member of the Power Users group.

    4. The policy only applies to Windows Server operating systems.

    5. Answer A is correct. The group policy value User Configuration, /Administrative Templates/Windows Components/Windows Explorer/Remove CD Burning Features prevents users from being able to use the Windows Explorer CD burning features. It does not prevent users from using third-party applications to create or modify CDs using a CD writer. Answer B is incorrect because Internet Explorer, with the policy enabled, explicitly prevents copying information to a CD. Answer C is incorrect because being a member of the Power Users group does not eliminate the effect of the policy. Answer D is incorrect because the policy applies to Windows Server and Windows XP operating systems.

  2. You are a desktop support technician for a large company and you support computers running Windows XP. A user, Joshua, wants to convert one of the hard drives connected to his Windows XP Professional desktop computer from a Basic disk to a Dynamic disk. In the Disk Management console, he right-clicks the physical disk designated as Disk 1, but the option to Convert to Dynamic Disk is unavailable. Why would the option to convert the drive to a Dynamic disk be disabled?

    1. There are already drive volumes with data stored on that physical disk.

    2. The drive is an external drive connected via USB or IEEE 1394 (FireWire) bus connections.

    3. The drive is an external Fibre Channel device.

    4. The drive has a sector size of 512 bytes.

    5. Answer B is correct. Hard disks connected via USB or FireWire (IEEE 1394) buses are not supported for Dynamic disks by default. Answer A is incorrect because you are allowed to convert disks with existing drive volumes and data to Dynamic disks; you cannot convert back to a Basic disk without deleting all existing volumes (and therefore the data on those volumes). Answer C is incorrect because Dynamic disks do support Fibre Channel drives. Answer D is incorrect because Dynamic disks require drives with 512 or fewer bytes per sector.

  3. You are a desktop support technician. A user, Toby, wants to convert physical hard disk 2 on his Windows XP Professional desktop computer from a Basic disk to a Dynamic disk using only the command line. Is a command-line tool available to accomplish this task? If so, what is the name of this utility and does it differ from the Disk Management console?

    1. The command-line tool is called diskperf.exe. Only administrative users may use it.

    2. No command-line tool equivalent to the Disk Management MMC exists.

    3. The command-line tool is called diskpart.exe. You must restart the computer for the conversion process to take effect.

    4. The command-line tool is called convert.exe. You do not need to restart the computer for the conversion to take place unless you are converting the boot disk.

    5. Answer C is correct. diskpart.exe is the command-line equivalent to Disk Management. You must restart the computer for the conversion to take effect. Answer A is incorrect because diskperf.exe enables and disables hard disk performance counters on earlier versions of Windows; it does nothing for converting Basic disks to Dynamic disks. Answer B is incorrect because a command-line utility with functionally equivalent to Disk Management does exist—diskpart.exe. Answer D is incorrect because you use the convert.exe command-line tool to convert a FAT or FAT32 volume to NTFS.

  4. You are a desktop support technician. A user complains that he is running low on available disk space for critical database records he is importing into his sales database. The data resides in a partition on a Basic disk on a computer running Windows XP. If you suggest converting to a Dynamic disk, what types of storage solutions would the conversion provide? (Select all correct answers.)

    1. Spanned volumes

    2. Extended volumes

    3. RAID-5 volumes

    4. Simple volumes

    5. Volume sets

    6. Striped volumes

    7. Mirrored volumes

    8. Answers A, D, and F are correct. Spanned volumes enable you to store data sequentially over two or more physical disks, but Windows XP displays the disks as one logical drive volume. Simple volumes are the most fundamental dynamic volumes, with each simple volume residing on only one physical disk. Striped volumes are also supported under Windows XP, enabling you to store data in stripes across two or more physical disks, but Windows XP displays the disks as one logical drive volume. Answer B is incorrect because there is no such volume as an extended volume on a Dynamic disk. Answer C is incorrect because Windows XP Professional does not support the fault-tolerant RAID-5 volume configuration. Answer E is incorrect because volume sets were supported for Basic disks under Windows NT; they are known as spanned volumes under Windows XP. Answer G is incorrect because Windows XP Professional does not support the fault-tolerant mirrored volume configuration.

  5. You are a desktop support technician. A user, Hazel, has a Windows XP Professional computer that has two physical hard drives installed. Both disks have been converted to Dynamic disks. The first disk (disk 0) has a capacity of 20GB with a drive C (system and boot) volume of 2GB, a drive D volume of 7GB, and 11GB of unallocated free space. The second disk (disk 1) has a capacity of 30GB with 20GB of unallocated free space. Hazel needs to extend drive D (a simple volume) on her computer so that the volume has an increased amount of total disk space—from 7GB to 14GB. How can you accomplish this without deleting any existing data? (Select all correct answers.)

    1. Repartition and reformat drive C.

    2. Extend drive D to an area of free space on disk 1.

    3. Extend drive D to an area of free space on disk 0.

    4. Convert disk 1 to Basic and extend the volume.

    5. Answers B and C are correct. You can extend a simple volume on a Dynamic disk onto unallocated free space of additional Dynamic disks up to a maximum of 32 Dynamic disks; this process automatically turns the volume into a spanned volume. You can also extend a simple volume on a Dynamic disk onto an area of unallocated free space on the same Dynamic disk. Answer A is incorrect because repartitioning and reformatting a disk deletes any data stored on the disk. Answer D is incorrect because converting a disk from Dynamic to Basic deletes any data stored on the disk.

  6. You are a desktop support technician. To make accessing several different hard drive volumes and removable drives easier on a local Windows XP computer, you want your users to be able to access each drive volume through different folder names located on the same drive letter. How can you accomplish this?

    1. Use the subst.exe command-line utility to specify each folder as a unique drive letter.

    2. Use the Disk Management console to create mount points for each hard drive volume letter through empty folders on the same FAT or FAT32 volume.

    3. Use diskpart.exe to create mount points for each hard drive volume letter through empty folders on the same NTFS volume.

    4. Use diskperf.exe to create mount points for each hard drive volume letter through empty folders on the same NTFS volume.

    5. Answer C is correct. You can use either diskpart.exe or the Disk Management MMC snap-in to create mount points for a drive letter through empty NTFS folders. Answer A is incorrect because the subst.exe command associates a specific drive letter path with a different drive letter root folder. Answer B is incorrect because you can only create mount points on empty NTFS folders. Answer D is incorrect because diskperf.exe enables and disables hard-disk performance counters on earlier versions of Windows.

  7. You are a desktop support technician. What is the easiest way to convert an NTFS drive volume configured as drive D to the FAT32 file system without losing any existing data? Assume that the volume is not the system or boot volume.

    1. Use the command convert d: /fs:fat32.

    2. Use the command convert d: /fs:-ntfs.

    3. Use the Disk Management console to revert the volume back to FAT or FAT32.

    4. Back up all the data stored on the NTFS drive volume, use diskpart.exe or the Disk Management console to delete the volume, create a new volume, format the volume as FAT32, and then restore the backed-up data.

    5. Answer D is correct. Windows XP does not offer a conversion tool for converting an existing NTFS volume to FAT, to FAT32, or to any other file system. You must back up all the data on the volume, create a new volume, format it, and restore the data. Answer A is incorrect because the convert.exe command does not support the conversion to the FAT or FAT32 file systems. Answer B is incorrect because the convert.exe command-line tool only supports a conversion to NTFS; prepending a minus sign (-) to the NTFS parameter is not supported. Answer C is incorrect because the Disk Management console only supports reformatting an existing NTFS drive volume to convert it to the FAT or FAT32 file system.

  8. You are a desktop support technician. A user complains that she cannot copy a 100MB folder onto a USB 2.0 pen drive that she has been issued for transferring files. What is the most likely reason she is unable to store the files on the pen drive?

    1. You have a strict disk quota policy that uses default settings.

    2. Because you cannot limit the enforcement of a disk quota on removable media, the drive must be faulty.

    3. You have enabled the Apply Policy to removable media policy.

    4. She is logged on with local administrator privileges.

    5. Answer C is correct. In the group policy feature, you can enable the computer policy Administrative Templates/System/Disk Quotas/Apply Policy to Removable Media. This policy extends disk quotas to include removable media. Answer A is incorrect. By default, disk quota policies do not apply to removable media. Answer B is incorrect. You can apply disk quotas to removable media. There is no evidence that the pen drive is faulty. Answer D is incorrect; logging on with local administrator privileges does not necessarily prohibit a user from being able to store files to removable media.

  9. You are a desktop support technician. Layla is attempting to format a USB 2.0 pen drive in her computer. However, the format option is not available. How can you make the format option available to her?

    1. Using group policies, enable the program format.exe for Layla's account.

    2. Using group policies, remove Layla's name from Restricted Groups.

    3. Add Layla's name to the local Administrators group on her computer.

    4. Modify the local policy on the machine, Allowed to Format and Eject Removable Objects.

    5. Answer D is correct. By modifying the local policy Computer Configuration/Windows Settings/Security Settings/Local Policies/Security Options/Devices:Allowed to Format and Eject Removable Objects (administrators). By default, only administrators are allowed to format and eject removable media. Answer A is incorrect; there is no program named format.exe. Answer B is incorrect. Restricted Groups is designed to control membership in local groups on computers running Windows XP. Removing Layla's name from the Administrators group does not elevate his privileges; more than likely, it reduces them. Answer C is incorrect; adding Layla's name to the local Administrators group will possibly enable him to use the format option, provided that the policy in the local machine is configured to allow administrators to format removable media. However, it is not advisable to add users to the local administrators group to provide them with specific privileges; it is more secure to elevate their permissions in a more specific way.

  10. You are a desktop support technician. When Bob attempts to install a software program from CD and is unable to do so, a message appears that says "the feature cannot be found".

  11. The CD is visible in Explorer. He can copy files from the CD to the hard drive.

    Bob tries to install the program on another computer, and when he double-clicks the program setup.exe, the program proceeds successfully.

    Bob's original computer has sufficient disk space on which to install the software. What is a possible reason for Bob's inability to install the software on his computer running Windows XP?

    1. A policy that prevents installation from removable media is in place on Bob's computer.

    2. This function is not supported by Windows XP.

    3. The CD is corrupt and unreadable.

    4. It's a faulty driver. Use driver rollback to replace the CD-ROM driver.

    5. Answer A is correct. If the policy User Configuration/Administrative Templates/Windows Components/Windows Installer/Prevent Removable Media Source for Any Install is enabled, when a user tries to install a program from removable media, the process fails. If you disable the setting, or do not configure it, users can install from removable media. Answer B is incorrect; Windows XP supports CD-based software installation, by default. Answer C is incorrect; the CD is readable in other computers and can be used to copy files. Answer D is incorrect. There is no evidence of a driver problem.

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