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3.3 Management and Traffic Interfaces

This section will introduce you to the two types of interfaces available on the routers: management and traffic. A management interface is a physical or virtual port through which the router can be configured, maintained, or monitored, but which does not route traffic. A traffic interface is one through which routable network conversations are forwarded.

Several methods are provided that permit for the management and administration of the routers. These interfaces to the router include the following:

  • SNMP—Network engineering staff or administrators can not only learn about the health and activity of the router through SNMP, but can also configure it from a network management workstation using any popular SNMP tool. The benefit of this is that it makes configuration management simple. Past configurations can be archived (and dated) on the management station. It also means that many remote routers can be managed and configured from a central workstation.

  • User CLI—The user process running on the routing engine permits management of the router through the CLI. The network engineer or administrator can, in this way, configure routing protocols, interface specifics, and systemwide instructions through a console, workstation, or laptop.

  • Craft interface—The craft interface, as we discussed in Section 3.2.1.4, provides a window into the operations of the router—its health, uptime, and alarms. The craft interface also allows the administrator to take an FPC offline for removal and maintenance.

Table 3–4 shows the types of traffic interfaces that each M-Series model can support:

Table 3–4 Traffic Interface Types per Model

PIC Type

M5 and M10

M20 and M40

M160

ATM

Uses all

Uses all

Uses all

4-port DS-3

4-port E3

2-port OC-3/STM-1 MM and SMIR

1-port OC-12/STM-4 MM and SMIR

ATM types

ATM types

ATM types

Channelized DS-3

2-port DS-3 with 28 T1 channels per port

4-port DS-3 with 28 T1 channels per port

Channelized OC-12 to DS-3

Uses both

Uses the 4 port only

Uses the 4 port only

1-port OC-12 SMIR with 12 DS-3 channels per port

Yes

Yes

Yes

Channelized STM-1 to E1

1-port STM-1 SMIR with 63 E1 channels per port

Yes

Yes

Yes

DS-3

2-port

4-port

Uses both

Uses the 4 port only

Uses the 4 port only

E1

4-port

Yes

Yes

Yes

E3

2-port

4-port

Uses both

Uses the 4-port only

Uses the 4-port only

Fast Ethernet

4-port

48-port

Uses the 4-port only

Uses the 4-port only

Uses both

Gigabit Ethernet

1-port LH, LX, SX

2-port LX and SX

4-port SX

Uses the 1-port only

Uses the 1-port only

Uses all

SONET/SDH

2-port OC-3c/STM-1 MM and SMIR

Yes

No

No

4-port OC-3x/STM-1 MM and SMIR

Yes

No

No

1-port OC-12c/STM-1 MM and SMIR both in concatenated and nonconcatenated modes

Yes

No

No

4-port OC-3c/STM-1 MM and SMIR

No

Yes

Yes

1-port OC-12c/STM-4 MM and SMIR both in concatenated and nonconcatenated modes

No

Yes

Yes

4-port OC-12c/STM-4 MM and SMIR

No

No

Yes

1-port OC-48c/STM-16 SMSR concatenated and nonconcatenated modes

No

Yes

Yes

1-port OC-48c/STM-16 SMLR concatenated and nonconcatenated modes

No

Yes

No

1-port OC-192x/STM-64 SR2 and LR both in concatenated and nonconcatenated modes

No

No

Yes

T1

4-port

Yes

Yes

Yes

Tunnel Services PIC

Yes

Yes

Yes


The difference between the models lies primarily in the number of ports supported and in the type of throughput that is available on the backplane. Table 3–5 lists the type of throughput, the number of PICs supported, and the number of ports for each model.

Table 3–5 Port Density by Model

Model

M5

M10

M20

M40

M160

Full-Duplex Throughput

6.4Gbps

10Gbps

20Gbps

40Gbps

160Gbps

Target Network Size

Medium to Large

Medium to Large

Medium to Large

Large

Very Large

Number of PICs Supported

4

8

16

32

32

Number of Ports

Up to 16

Up to 32

Up to 64

Up to 128

Up to 32 OC-12

Or Up to 32 OC-48

Or

Up to 8 OC-192


It is important to note that, by default, all physical interfaces on the Juniper Networks routers use PPP, but can be configured to use other Layer 2 encapsulation types. If an interface is of a type that does not support PPP, you must configure the appropriate encapsulation type. For specific information about interface encapsulation options, including configuration examples, please refer to Chapter 8.

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