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This chapter is from the book

This chapter is from the book

Kinds of Databases

Since the PC became a major office tool, there have been a number of popular databases developed that are intended to run by themselves on PCs. These include elementary databases like Microsoft Works and more sophisticated ones like Approach, dBase, Borland Paradox, Microsoft Access, and FoxBase.

Another category of PC databases includes databases intended to be accessed from a server by a number of PC clients. These include IBM DB/2, Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, and Sybase. All of these database products support various relatively similar dialects of SQL, and thus all of them would appear at first to be relatively interchangeable. The reason they are not interchangeable, of course, is that each was designed with different performance characteristics involved and each with a different user interface and programming interface. While you might think that because they all support SQL, they are programmed the same way, quite the opposite is true. Each database has its own way of receiving the SQL queries and its own way of returning the results. This is where the next proposed level of standardization came about: ODBC.

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