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Let the Programming Begin

The first thing to do is add the normal state text elements to your Stage. If you created your Photoshop canvas originally at the same size as your Director Stage and positioned your text element in the desired location, there's an easy way to make sure that your elements wind up in the proper location. Simply grab the normal state text element (known as a cast member once inside of Director) from the Cast and then drag it into your Score. Place this cast member onto the desired track and frame. By placing a cast member directly into the Score, Director automatically defaults the placement to where the image was initially created in Photoshop. If you drag the cast member onto the Stage, you run the risk of not placing it in the exact position you intended.

NOTE

Once a cast member is placed on the Stage or in the Score, it is referred to as a Sprite.

Like most applications, there are several ways to accomplish the same goals. For this exercise, I will avoid typing in any lines of programming codes (known as Lingo in Director). Instead, I will strictly use the power of Director's Behaviors. Behaviors are "pre-written" lines of code that produce or perform most of the common functions that one would use when developing an interactive application.

Here's the part where we need to assume that you understand how Director works. To sum it up quickly, interactivity happens when the user is brought to a different part of the application, based on time or user interaction. This "jump" to a different part of the application is done through a series of navigational commands (whether through Lingo commands or through the use of Behaviors) that provide the instructions about where to go in your Score or what to do.

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