Home > Articles > Networking > Network Administration & Management

  • Print
  • + Share This
Like this article? We recommend

Plan on Planning

Once my research was done, it was on to creating the project plan. Creating a project plan is not as stuffy as it sounds—at least not in the beginning. To begin creating a project plan, you create what's known as a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS).

To create a WBS, you take the work at hand (in this case, upgrading the network) and you break it into large, chunky phases. This job had three fat phases:

  1. Upgrade the network cable.

  2. Install and create a Windows 2000 domain.

  3. Install Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server.

Then, the work is broken down some more, adding detail and steps under each phase. The new information is technically called work units:

  1. Upgrade the network cable.

    1. Add rat poison and traps.
    2. Add J-Hooks according to code.
    3. Run plenum-grade cable throughout office.

  2. Install and create a Windows 2000 domain.

    1. Configure five new servers.
    2. Configure AD.
    3. Configure policies.

  3. Install Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server.

    1. Add Exchange services.
    2. Add and configure SMTP.
    3. Import user accounts.

You would continue to break down the work units in the list into tasks. When all of the work units have broken down into manageable and logical tasks, you've got your WBS. At first glance, your task list looks longer than Oprah's shopping list. Look again, though, and see that you've got a detailed checklist of the work to be completed.

  • + Share This
  • 🔖 Save To Your Account