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This chapter is from the book

This chapter is from the book

Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP)

TFTP lives up to its name quite well. TFTP is the poor cousin of FTP in that it shares only a very small subset of the capabilities of FTP. It uses UDP, which, to use a similar metaphor, is TCP's poor relative. TFTP has no packet-monitoring capabilities and practically no error-handling capabilities. But then again, these limitations also reduce the process overhead. TFTP does not authenticate; it merely connects. As a built-in protection, TFTP can only move files that are publicly accessible.

Security is of great concern when employing TFTP. As a result, TFTP is typically used for embedded applications and copying configuration files for router configuration and in situations where space is of concern, and where security is handled in another fashion. TFTP is also used in a network computer environment where each machine is booted from a remote server and where TFTP can be easily embedded in the ROMs (Read Only Memory) on network cards.

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