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Installing, Configuring, Managing, Monitoring, and Troubleshooting DHCP in a Windows 2000 Network Infrastructure

Everybody loves DHCP. For this Windows 2000 exam, you need to know all about DHCP: how it works, its nuances, and how to configure and manage this network service. This quiz tests your knowledge on this Windows 2000 Server exam objective.

1. Jennifer is the network administrator for Mitchell Corporation. Her network has three Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, three Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 875 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. This network was recently upgraded from a Novell environment to Windows 2000. Jennifer's assistant, Mark, recently installed a new DNS server, and needs to add this information to each of the clients. Jennifer discovers that Mark and three other IT helpers have visited every machine changing the DNS server's IP address configuration in each of the hosts. Unfortunately, many of the workstations were accidentally configured with the wrong IP address for the DNS server. What should Jennifer recommend to alleviate the problem?

  1. Enter a CNAME record on the DNS server to point to the new DNS server for the workstations.

  2. Configure the old DNS server as a forwarder to the new DNS server.

  3. Configure the clients to use DHCP and manage all of the IP settings from a DHCP server.

  4. Configure the clients to use DHCP with reservations for each client with the IP addresses of the appropriate DNS servers.

Answer: 13

2. Harold is the network administrator for a Windows 2000 domain. His network has three sites: Chicago, Bloomington, and Rockford—each connected by a T1 line. Within each site, Harold has positioned two Windows 2000 Servers as domain controllers and at least two Windows 2000 Servers as member servers. In Chicago, there are 523 Windows 2000 Professional workstations; in Bloomington, there are 342 Windows 2000 Professional workstations; and in Rockford, there are 22 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Each workstation has been configured to receive its IP information from a DHCP server. Based on this information, what is the minimum amount of DHCP servers Harold has to install on this network?

  1. 1

  2. 2

  3. 3

  4. 6

Answer: 14

3. Harold is the network administrator for a Windows 2000 domain. His network has three sites: Chicago, Bloomington, and Rockford—each connected by a T1 line. Within each site, Harold has positioned two Windows 2000 Servers as domain controllers and at least two Windows 2000 Servers as member servers. In Chicago, there are 523 Windows 2000 Professional workstations; in Bloomington, there are 342 Windows 2000 Professional workstations; and in Rockford, there are 22 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Harold has installed one DHCP in Chicago that provides IP address for all of the networks. How many scopes does Harold have to configure if his network address is 131.107.x.x?

  1. One. This is a Class B IP address range, so all of the hosts can fit within this range.

  2. Three. Harold has to subnet the range and make three distinct scopes for each site.

  3. Three. Harold has to subnet the range for three networks, which results in the subnet mask of 255.255.224.0. Because three bits are used in high order for 224, three scopes are required.

  4. Thirty. Harold has to subnet the range to get the three networks. This results in 30 networks.

Answer: 15

4. Maude is the network administrator of a small Windows 2000 domain. She has two Windows 2000 Servers, one of which is a domain controller, and 40 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Currently, she connects to the Internet through a fractional T1 line. Her router's IP address is 131.107.2.1. For security, she installed a third-party proxy server, and plans to use private IP addresses on her internal network. What is the correct IP addressing scheme Maude should use?

  1. Scope range 131.107.2.3-43, subnet mask 255.255.0.0

  2. Scope range 10.10.10.1-40, subnet mask 255.255.0.0

  3. Scope range 10.10.10.1-40, subnet mask 255.255.255.0

  4. Scope range 131.107.3.1-40, subnet mask 255.255.0.0

Answer: 16

5. Franz is a new Windows 2000 network administrator. His network consists of three Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, two Windows 2000 member servers, and 876 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. He wants to install and configure a Windows 2000 DHCP server, but doesn't know how. Which two of the following allow him to install DHCP for this network? (Choose two.)

  1. DHCP is installed by default; there are not two possible answers.

  2. DHCP can be installed through the Configure Your Server Application applet.

  3. DHCP can be installed through the Control Panel's Add/Remove Programs applet.

  4. DHCP can be installed through the Control Panel's Network and Dial-Up Connections applet.

Answers: 17

6. Beth is a Windows 2000 domain administrator. Her network has four Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, three Windows 2000 member servers, and 286 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Her network is subnetted into three sites: Knox, Chatt, and Nash. She installed a DHCP server in each subnet for redundancy. Donald from Knoxville contacts Beth, and reports that he can't connect to any of the servers in Chattanooga or Nashville. Beth wants him to tell her his IP address. What command does Donald use to reveal the DHCP assigned address?

  1. ipconfig /all

  2. winipcfg

  3. Properties of Local Area Network connections and then the TCP/IP properties

  4. ping

Answer: 18

7. Jeremy is the Windows 2000 domain administrator. His network has four Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, three member servers, and 786 Windows 2000 Professional workstations across three subnets. He is about to configure the DHCP server for the three subnets. Jeremy realizes, however, that there are network print devices that have IP addresses on each network. Several of these printers are in the middle of the IP range he wants to assign to his workstations. What can Jeremy do to alleviate the problem?

  1. Change the IP information on the printers to use DHCP.

  2. Change the IP information on the printers to use the first few IP address of the range. In DHCP, start the scope of IP address after these printers' addresses.

  3. In DHCP, create reservations for the IP addresses already in use.

  4. In DHCP, create exclusions for the IP addresses already in use.

Answer: 19

8. Rachel is the Windows 2000 domain administrator for Pratt Enterprises. Her network consists of four Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, three Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, 675 Windows 2000 Professional workstations, and 476 Windows NT 4.0 workstations that will be upgraded next year. On two of her servers, Rachel has configured DNS. Server A is the primary DNS server, whereas Server B is a secondary. Additionally, Rachel has configured two DHCP servers with scopes that provide for the same network addresses, but do not overlap. She made the conversion on all of the workstations to use DHCP. Shortly after the conversion, several users called and reported that they cannot connect to servers and printers throughout the network. What do you suspect is the problem?

  1. The workstations need to be rebooted.

  2. The workstations need to use the ipconfig /renew command.

  3. The workstations need the IP address of a WINS server.

  4. The workstations need the IP address of the router.

Answer: 20

9. Michelle is the network administrator for the Robertson Wig and Hat Company. Her network consists of two Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, three Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 1,239 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. All of the workstations are configured with the default TCP/IP settings. Michelle has just created and activated a DHCP scope with the DNS and Router options. When she does use the ipconfig /all command however, she does not see the TCP/IP settings from her DHCP server. Michelle tries the ipconfig /renew option, but the DHCP settings remain the same. What do you suspect is the problem?

  1. The Windows 2000 Professional TCP/IP settings are configured with a static IP address. Michelle must change the setting to use DHCP on each workstation.

  2. The Windows 2000 Professional workstations need the ipconfig /release and the ipconfig /renew command to force the new DHCP settings.

  3. The DHCP server must be authorized in the Active Directory for the server to be in effect.

  4. The DHCP scope must be authorized in the Active Directory for the server to be in effect.

Answer: 21

10. Michelle is the network administrator for the Robertson Wig and Hat Company. Her network consists of two Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, three Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 1,239 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. All of the workstations are configured with the default TCP/IP settings. Michelle has just created and activated a DHCP scope with the DNS and Router options. She has now activated the DHCP server in Active Directory, and has set the lease options for the clients to six days. When will a client attempt to renew the IP address?

  1. Three days.

  2. Six days.

  3. The clients keep their IP addresses until something changes on the DHCP server.

  4. The clients keep their IP addresses until they reboot, or six days.

Answer: 22

11. Joanna is the Windows 2000 network administrator for King Sales. Her network has six Windows 2000 domain controllers, four Windows 2000 member servers, and 853 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Her clients are on the first, tenth, and seventeenth floor of an office building. Because of the number of hosts on her network, Joanna uses three Class C IP addresses through DHCP server. To make managing these networks easier, she has created one superscope. What is a superscope?

  1. Three or more networks linked together via an independent fiber backbone. DHCP can service requests from any network.

  2. A DHCP setting that allows hosts from any network to use any available IP address from any of the scopes created.

  3. A DHCP setting that allows clients to request a specific IP address from their position in the network. For example, printers can select a unique range, whereas workstations on the first floor would select from another range.

  4. A DHCP setting that combines two or more ranges of the same IP class into one scope.

Answer: 23

12. You are a Windows 2000 consultant, and you have been hired to troubleshoot a DHCP server that seems to occasionally crash, become unavailable, and manifest other mysterious activity. For starters, you want to see when the DHCP server was starteWhere can you find this information?

  1. In the registry: HKEY\LocalMachine\CurrentControlSet\Serives\DHCP\Uptime

  2. In the DHCP Manager: Choose Start Time from the DHCP Server Properties on the Advanced Settings tab.

  3. Check for DHCP server service starting in the Application Log

  4. This is recorded only if DHCP Logging has been enabled

Answer: 24

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