Home > Articles > Certification > Microsoft Certification

  • Print
  • + Share This

Configuring and Troubleshooting Windows 2000 Network Connections

What good is a server without a network to serve on? This quiz tests your Windows 2000 networking skills. You'll be tested on NICs, protocols (can you say TCP/IP?), DHCP, DNS, and WINS. You also need experience with NAT, RRAS, VPNs, and Terminal Services to pass. This quiz tests your knowledge on this Windows 2000 Server exam objective.

  1. Jane is the network administrator for Chambers Industrial Supplies. Her network consists of three Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, two Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 435 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Nancy, Jane's supervisor, asked Jane enable users to connect to resources on the local LAN through their cable and DSL modems at home. What is Jane's solution?

    1. Jane can install a bank of modems that allows users to call into the server.
    2. Jane can create a PPTP connection to allow users from home to connect the server and network resources.
    3. Jane can create a VPN for cable users and another for DSL users.
    4. Jane can create a VPN for remote users.

    Answer

  2. Harold is the network administrator for RedWind Moving Company. His network is primarily a Novell NetWare environment, although Harold has implemented a Windows 2000 Server as a file and printer server for a testing phase. Currently, this server has TCP/IP and NWLink installed for NetWare communications. Harold wants to change the provider order for the Windows 2000 Server so that the Microsoft Windows Network is second and the Netware Network is first. However, Harold can't remember where to make the change. How does Harold change the Network Provider Order?

    1. Harold can't make this change. Microsoft is always the first Network Provider.
    2. Harold can make the change through Connections Properties on the Adapters and Bindings tab.
    3. Harold can make the change through Connection Properties on the Provider Order tab.
    4. Harold can make the change through Connection Properties on the Advanced tab in the Provider Order section.

    Answer

  3. Victor is the network administrator for a small Windows 2000 domain. He has two Windows 2000 Servers: a domain controller and a member server. The 17 clients in the domain are using Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Recently, Victor ordered a cable modem for the network, and installed a third-party firewall software package. The software package acts as a NAT and proxy for the local LAN. Victor has configured the software on the server and can connect to the Internet from the server, but he cannot connect from users' workstations. What is the problem?

    1. The third-party software is not compatible with Windows 2000.
    2. There is no DHCP server on the network.
    3. Windows 2000 does not work with NAT—it requires a direct connection to the Internet.
    4. Victor has not published the NAT software in AD.

    Answer

  4. James is creating a test environment for Windows 2000 Servers. He has created a small domain named TEST and has six Windows 2000 Servers in the domain. For practice, he has added six Windows 2000 Professional workstations as well. He installed DHCP on one of the member servers, and assigned a range of 10.10.10.1–10.10.10.20 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. However, when he checks the TCP/IP properties of the workstations, they are configured with an address of 169.254.x.x and a Class B subnet mask. What is the problem?

    1. James has not authorized the DHCP Server to participate in the Active Directory.
    2. Nothing is wrong. The 10.10.10.x address range is a private address range that DHCP cannot assign to hosts.
    3. The hosts are most likely configured with static Class B IP addresses and subnet masks.
    4. James has not restarted the DHCP Server since adding the service.

    Answer

  5. As the network administrator for King Automotive Suppliers, you are making plans to upgrade your current network to a Windows 2000 domain. Your network will have eight Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, six Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 1,980 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Your network is located in one city, but it has 16 LANs. You have been tasked with configuring the TCP/IP address for the 16 networks. Your original network address is 131.107.2.x. Based on this information, what will be the subnet mask for each network?

    1. 255.255.255.0

    2. 255.255.248.0

    3. 255.255.255.248

    4. 255.248.0.0

    Answer

  6. You are the network administrator for King Automotive Suppliers, and you are making plans to upgrade your current network to a Windows 2000 domain. Your network will have eight Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, six Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 1,980 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Your network is located in one city, but it has 16 LANs. You have been tasked with configuring the TCP/IP address for the 16 networks. Your original network address is 131.107.2.x. Based on this information, what is the maximum number of hosts that can be on any network?

    1. 510

    2. 1022

    3. 2046

    4. 4094

    Answer

  7. Jeremy is the network administrator of a Windows 2000 domain. His domain consists of seven Windows 2000 Servers, three of which are domain controllers, and 899 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. One of the member servers is the DNS server for the domain. It is configured to answer internal requests, but with the recent addition of a T1 line, Jeremy needs to configure network requests that are resources outside of the network to be resolved through this DNS Server. How can Jeremy configure the DNS Server so that name requests will be resolved?

    1. Jeremy has to configure the Windows 2000 Professional workstations to use a second DNS server. If the resource is not in the internal DNS Server, the workstations request the second DNS server for the resolution.
    2. Jeremy has to configure his DNS server to retrieve the HOSTS lists daily from one of the 13 root-level servers.
    3. Jeremy has to configure his DNS server as a forwarder to one of the 13 root-level servers.
    4. Jeremy has to configure his DNS server as a forwarder to his ISP's DNS servers.

    Answer

  8. Amy is the network administrator of a Windows 2000 domain. Her network consists of seven Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, six Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 1,230 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. She has been working with DHCP to assign the workstations an IP address automatically, and things are working great. Now, however, she wants to configure the DHCP or DNS server to allow the Windows 2000 Professional workstations to register with the DNS server automatically. How can Amy accomplish this in Windows 2000?

    1. In the DNS Manager, Amy can create a DHCP record for the DHCP server(s), and set the value to Allow Dynamic Updates for this server.
    2. In the DNS Manager, Amy can change the default option on the DNS server to Allow Dynamic Updates from Windows 2000 Clients, and restart the DNS service.
    3. In the DHCP Manager, Amy can add the scope options 006 and 007. 007 requires the IP address of the DNS server(s) that the clients will register with after they receive their IP address.
    4. In the DHCP Manager, Amy can change the value of the DHCP server on the DNS tab to Automatically Update DHCP Client Information in DNS.

    Answer

  9. You are a consultant for Windows 2000. A new client contacts you to tell you he had to fire his network administrator. He wants you to straighten out the network, and solve some network problems. You learn that the network consists of four Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, two Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 254 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. One of the biggest problems deals with the IP conflicts it's been receiving. As it turns out, the old administrator manually assigned some IP addresses, and used DHCP as well. Unfortunately, some of the static IP addresses are included in the scope of addresses the server is leasing. Additionally, some of the static IP addresses are on laptops, so they are not always on the network. What can you do to solve the problem?

    1. There is nothing you can do because DHCP assigns any available IP addresses in its pool, regardless of if they are already assigned or not.
    2. You need to implement DHCP Conflict Detection.
    3. You need to change all of the hosts to use DHCP.
    4. You need to create reservations for the static assigned IP addresses.

    Answer

  10. The same company discussed in question 9 has a new problem to present to you. Several of the workstations are not using Windows 2000; they use Windows 95 and Windows 98. The company does have plans for you to upgrade these operating systems, but it may be weeks before the new Windows 2000 Professional workstations arrive. The big problem with these workstations is that they cannot connect to network resources. In fact, many of these workers haven't even turned on their computers in weeks because they can't print, access their home folders, or access shared folders on the servers. Upon investigation, you learn that this all began when the fired administrator made the conversion to Windows 2000 Servers. What do you suspect is the problem and how can it be resolved?

    1. These workstations do not have permission to log on to the domain.
    2. These workstations do not have the IP address of the DNS server.
    3. These workstations need to be configured with the IP address of a WINS server.
    4. These workstations can't communicate with Windows 2000 because the domain is no longer in mixed mode.

    Answer

  11. Tracy is the network administrator for Campbell Enterprises. Her network has four Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, two Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 232 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. 95 of the 232 workstations are remote users. Tracy needs a common method to allow the remote users to dial into one of the member servers from anywhere in the world. She has installed RRAS, and is using a bank of modems. Now, several of the mobile users have asked for alternative methods of connecting, such as through cable modems or DSL lines. What options does Tracy have for users on the current RRAS server?

    1. None. An RRAS server can provide only one type of connection at a time.
    2. Tracy can add VPN usage to allow users to connect through their cable and DSL lines.
    3. Tracy can add VPN usage to allow users to connect through the Internet.
    4. Tracy can add cable and/or DSL modems to allow the remote users to dial in through the current RRAS configuration.

    Answer

  12. John is the administrator for a Windows 2000 domain. His domain has two sites: Tampa and StPete. His domain has four Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, two member servers, and 98 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. John finds that he is constantly moving between the two offices for administrative duties. He wants to configure the servers so that he can remotely administer any server from one central location. What should John do?

    1. Enable Remote Administration through Terminal Service for each of the Windows 2000 Servers.
    2. Enable Remote Administration through NetMeeting for each of the Windows 2000 Servers.
    3. Create an MMC that allows John to remotely administer services on the remote computers.
    4. Create an MMC for each server to remotely administer services on each Windows 2000 Servers.

    Answer

  • + Share This
  • 🔖 Save To Your Account

Related Resources

There are currently no related titles. Please check back later.