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Managing, Monitoring, and Optimizing System Performance, Reliability, and Availability

Of course, Windows 2000 is stable—right? This quiz tests your ability to manage, monitor, and optimize the performance, reliability, and availability of your Windows 2000 Server. You need to know about applications, system recovery, system state, and good ol' backup. This quiz tests your knowledge on this Windows 2000 Server exam objective.

  1. Mark is about to install a 32-bit application on a Windows 2000 Server. He is explaining to Mary, his supervisor, that the 32-bit application will be more efficient than the older 16-bit application. Which of the following is an accurate reflection of the Windows 2000 Server's handling of 32-bit applications versus older operating systems and 16-bit applications?

    1. 16-bit applications cannot run on Windows 2000.
    2. 32-bit applications were designed for Windows 2000.
    3. Windows 2000 uses preemptive multitasking to handle threads.
    4. Windows 2000 uses cooperative multitasking to handle threads.

    Answer

  2. You are the network administrator for a Windows 2000 domain. Your domain consists of three Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, four Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 1,539 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Harold, your assistant, has changed the application priority on one of your member servers to give foreground applications a boost in priority. You want to change this setting back to the default so that all applications have the same level of priority. How can this change be accomplished?

    1. You must edit the HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Processes\Threads\Parameter key in the Registry to set all threads to Normal. After restarting, the change will take place.
    2. You have to change the processes through the Task Manager. No restart is necessary.
    3. You have to change the application priority through a PIF (Program Information File) on each application Harold has changed.
    4. You can make this universal change through System Properties\Performance, and choose Background Services.

    Answer

  3. You are a consultant for Mardi Gras Designs and Fabrics, Inc. Luci, the network administrator, has contacted you with a question on application priority. She wants to change one application's foreground priority to High without impacting all of the background services on her Windows 2000 Server. Can this be done, and if so, how?

    1. Yes, this can done through a command prompt with the following command: start /priority application.exe.

    2. Yes, this can done through a command prompt with the following command: start /realtime application.

    3. Yes, this can done through a command prompt with the following command: start /high application.exe

    4. No, this cannot be done. Windows 2000 Server does not allow applications to be started with higher priority.

    Answer

  4. Jan is the network administrator of a Windows 2000 domain. Her domain consists of three Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, one member server, and 39 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. The data that Jan's company works with is very sensitive and confidential. She suspects that a bogus spy type application is running on one of her servers; she believes it is recording her keystrokes. What method can Jan use to track down the application?

    1. Use Task Manager and the process tree to determine what applications are running.
    2. Use Task Manager and the process tree to determine which processes are running.
    3. Use System Information to see which resources are being used.
    4. Use Device Manager to see whether any additional drivers were applied to her keyboard, and if so, when they were added.

    Answer

  5. Michelle is the network administrator for Golding Architects. Her network consists of five Windows 2000 Servers, three of which are domain controllers. 123 of the clients on the network use Windows 2000 Professional workstations, and 73 use Windows 98. On one of the member servers, she has configured it as a file server for the architectural drawings. Some of the users have complained that the access time is slow for this server. She wants to monitor the performance of the server to determine process throughput, disk space, and memory usage. What tool best enables Michelle to accomplish this monitoring?

    1. Task Manager's Performance tab

    2. System Monitor

    3. Network Monitor

    4. Event Viewer

    Answer

  6. Michelle, the network administrator of Golding Architects, has completed the monitoring of her Windows 2000 Server that is acting as a member server. In her monitoring, she discovered that the Memory object and the Available Bytes counter was consistently low. What is this counter representative of, and what does a low value mean?

    1. This value means the total amount of memory available. A consistently low value means that the system probably needs more RAM.
    2. This value means the total amount of physical memory available. A consistently low value means that the system is not using all of the memory available. A low value is desirable.
    3. This value represents the total amount of memory being used by the system. The higher this value, the more RAM is required for the system to operate.
    4. This value represents the total amount of memory being used by user mode processes. A low value is indicative of low activity from user mode.

    Answer

  7. Quentin is the network administrator for Hourly Savings and Loan. His network contains three Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers; four Windows 2000 Servers acting as file, application, and printer servers; and 765 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. On one of his application servers, he has two 1Ghz processors, 1 GB of RAM, a fixed drive, and a hardware RAID-5 set. He installed Windows 2000 onto the fixed SCSI drive, but the application and data are stored on the RAID drive. Quentin now believes that his system is having an unusual amount of paging, and he wants to configure his system to address the problem. Of the following, which is the best solution for Quentin?

    1. Move the paging file from its default location in the System32 folder to the RAID drive.
    2. Edit the Registry to move the file from WINNT to the RAID drive.
    3. Move the paging file through System Properties\Advanced\Performance to the RAID drive.
    4. Stop the VMM32 service, move the pagefile.sys to the RAID drive, and restart the server.

    Answer

  8. Beth is the network administrator of a Windows 2000 domain that consists of two Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers and one Windows 2000 Server acting as a member server. 87 clients use Windows 2000 Professional workstations as their operating system. The member server is configured with one 1.1Ghz processor, 512MB of RAM, and two 80GB drives configured as a mirror set. The member server acts primarily as a file and printer server because all of her users' home folders are stored on this server. Beth wants to tune the Server service on the member server so that better throughput is enabled for her users. Which is the best option for Beth to choose on the Server service?

    1. Minimize Memory Used

    2. Balance

    3. Maximize Data Throughput for File Sharing

    4. Maximize Data Throughout for Network Applications

    Answer

  9. Holden is the network administrator for Winkton Enterprises, and you are a consultant for the company. The network that Winkton has in place consists of seven Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, five Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 1,653 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. In a recent staff meeting, Holden announced that he has configured all of the subsystems in all of the servers, so there is no longer a bottleneck in any of the servers. Janice, the CEO, turns to you and asks whether this possible. How should you respond?

    1. Yes, bottlenecks can be eliminated with enough RAM, processor power, bandwidth, and speedy drives.
    2. Yes, bottlenecks can be eliminated with enough RAM, processor power, bandwidth, speedy drives, and the proper tuning and configuration of Windows 2000 Server.
    3. No, RAM will always be a bottleneck in any system.
    4. No, there will always be some subsystem that will be the weakest link in any system.

    Answer

  10. Martha is the network administrator for a Windows 2000 domain. Her domain controllers consist of two 1.1 Ghz processors; 512MB of RAM; and two hard drives partitioned for data, applications, and system usage. Martha suspects that the hard drives are the bottleneck in her system, and wants to monitor the activity of the data partitions. What must Martha do to her drives in order to allow the monitoring of the logical drives?

    1. Nothing. Windows 2000 Server starts automatically with the disk counters enabled.
    2. She must enable the disk counters by using the diskperf –yd switch and then restarting the server.
    3. She must enable the disk counters by using the diskperf –yv switch and then restarting the server.
    4. She must enable the disk counters by using the diskperf –nv switch and then restarting the server.

    Answer

  11. You are the Windows 2000 consultant and all-around technical guru for Starlight Insurance Company. Your network, small and simple, consists of one Windows 2000 Server as a domain controller and a second Windows 2000 Server as a member server. The nine employees of the company use Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Rick, the owner of the company, calls you one morning to report that he changed a driver for a printer/scanner that he just purchased and wanted to hook up to the server. Now, unfortunately, he can't seem to boot the server. He wants to know if there's anything you can instruct him to do to get the server back up and running. Of course, he needs you to come into his office ASAP to install the printer, but he needs the server up immediately. Is there anything Rick can do?

    1. There's really nothing Rick can do until you can get there.
    2. Rick can try to invoke the Last Known Good command.
    3. Rick can restore the system from tape backup.
    4. Rick can boot from the first floppy disk of the four used to install Windows 2000 Server.

    Answer

  12. Nate is the network administrator for Nunchen Printing and Marketing, Inc. Nate's network consists of three Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, two Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 129 clients using Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Nate wants to configure a method for recovering the system state on each of his servers. He does a regular backup to a central server, but wants to ensure that he's doing everything he can, just in case one of the servers fails. What else can Nate do to ensure the health of his network?

    1. Nothing more. A regularly scheduled backup is all that's really required.
    2. Invoke the Recovery Console. Nate should edit the NLDR file to include the RECOVCONSOL command to invoke the Recovery Console in case of an emergency.
    3. Create Emergency Repair Disks for the system-wide data. Nate should create a universal RDISK for all of the domain controllers and a second for the member servers.
    4. Nate should be prepared to use the Emergency Repair Disk process. He needs the four startup disks used to install Server, the Server CD-ROM, and an Emergency Repair Disk to invoke the process.

    Answer

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