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Configuring and Troubleshooting Hardware Devices and Drivers

There's nothing more frustrating than trying to configure a stubborn piece of hardware to work with Windows 2000. This quiz tests your ability to configure and verify drivers, update drivers, and perform everyone's favorite task: troubleshooting hardware problems. This quiz tests your knowledge of this Windows 2000 Server exam objective.

  1. You are the network administrator for a Windows 2000 domain. Your network consists of seven Windows 2000 Servers, four of which are domain controllers, and 1,211 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. You have just purchased a new printer that connects to your server via USB. What steps should you take to install the USB printer?

    1. Power off the server, connect the USB printer, and allow Plug and Play to detect the new device.
    2. Connect the USB printer, and allow Plug and Play to detect the device.
    3. Connect the USB printer, restart the server, and allow Plug and Play to detect the device.
    4. Add the printer software, connect the USB printer, and allow Plug and Play to detect the new device.

    Answer

  2. Andrea is the network administrator of Headling Marketing. Her network consists of seven Windows 2000 Servers, two of which are domain controllers, and 1,322 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. One of the member servers is configured as an RRAS server, and has 24 analog modems connected for dial-up users. Andrea suspects that one of the modems is not acting properly, and wants to look at the properties of the modem. Where can she do this in Windows 2000 Server?

    1. Computer Manager\Device Manager
    2. Computer Management\Device Manager
    3. Computer Properties\Systems Manager
    4. System Information\Device Manager

    Answer

  3. You have just installed a new network card into your Windows 2000 Server. After installing the card, you cannot connect to the network. You check the physical connections, and they are fine. Your IP address is static and is configured properly. Within Device Manager, you discover a yellow exclamation next to the icon for the network card you have just installed. What is the problem? (Choose all that apply.)

    1. The IRQ is conflicting with another device.
    2. The I/O Range is conflicting with another device.
    3. The network card has the incorrect subnet mask.
    4. The network card has the incorrect driver.

    Answer

  4. Erica is the network administrator of a Windows 2000 domain. Her domain has only two Windows 2000 Servers, and both act as domain controllers and file and printer servers. Her clients are 25 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. On one of the domain controllers, she has just installed a high-end color plotter that her company will use to create posters for client events. The printer connects through a SCSI connection, but Windows 2000 has not detected the new device. What step should Erica try next to force Windows 2000 Server to detect the new hardware?

    1. Reboot the server.
    2. Initiate a hardware scan.
    3. Initiate a SCSI scan.
    4. Power off the printer and power down the server; then power on the printer and power up the server.

    Answer

  5. Marvin is creating a Windows 2000 server for a test environment. His hardware consists of two servers with 1.1Ghz processors, 512MB of RAM, two 80GB hard drives, two network cards, a sound card, and a 32-bit video card. Marvin has successfully installed Windows 2000 on both servers, but wants to be able to boot up the server with different configurations on the network cards (one started, one stopped, both started, and so on). What is the best method to accomplish this?

    1. Marvin should create a REGINI script that changes the values of the hardware in the Registry at each logon.
    2. Marvin should create profiles for each hardware, and log on to the server with different user names to reflect the profile he's created.
    3. Marvin should create hardware profiles for the different hardware configurations.
    4. Marvin cannot accomplish this with Windows 2000 Server.

    Answer

  6. Julie is the network administrator for a small Windows 2000 domain. Her domain consists of three Windows 2000 Servers, two of which are domain controllers. Her clients are 25 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. On the member server, she is about to install a new CD tower that will connect via SCSI. John, Julies' supervisor, has asked whether the driver from the manufacturer has been signed. What is John talking about?

    1. John wants to know whether the device driver has been digitally signed by Microsoft to work with Windows 2000 Server.
    2. John wants to know whether the device driver has been digitally signed by the manufacturer to work with Windows 2000 Server.
    3. John wants to know whether the device driver has been digitally signed by CompTIA to work with Windows 2000 Server.
    4. John wants to know whether the driver has been digitally signed as an I/O Resource and IRQ by Windows 2000 Server.

    Answer

  7. Sam is the network administrator for Johnson Enterprises. His domain consists of 27 Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, 16 Windows 2000 Servers acting as member servers, and 1,498 Windows 2000 Professional workstations in eight sites across the country. All of the servers have been installed and configured identically, but now Sam wants to ensure that each of the servers throughout the enterprise has a different level of driver signing options. What steps should Sam take to change the driver signing options within each server?

    1. Open the Registry and edit the HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Driv\Parameters setting.
    2. Open Device Manager and change the driver setting for the hardware class he wants to change.
    3. Create a system policy that allows the hardware driver signing options to be changed.
    4. Open Computer Properties and choose Driver Signing on the Hardware tab.

    Answer

  8. Virginia is the network administrator of a Windows 2000 domain. Her domain consists of four Windows 2000 Servers as her domain controllers and two Windows 2000 member servers—all with the same hardware configuration. Her clients all use Windows 2000 Professional. Recently, Virginia received an updated driver for the network card in her servers. The current card, according to the manufacturer, has a faulty driver that can cause the card to act only at half-duplex. What steps should Virginia do to update the driver?

    1. Power down the server, remove the card, and reboot. Windows 2000 Server will remove the card's drive. Power off the server, and add the card back to the system. When Windows 2000 Server detects the card, install the new device driver instead of the old one.
    2. Remove the card's driver through Device Manager, and reboot the server. Because the card is still needed, Windows 2000 Server will detect the card through PnP and then ask for the card's driver. Install the new driver from the manufacturer.
    3. Open Device Manager, and choose the Properties for the Network Card. On the Driver tab, choose Update Driver and supply the new driver from the manufacturer.
    4. Open Device Manager, and choose the Properties for the Network Card. On the Advanced tab, choose Update Driver and supply the new driver from the manufacturer.

    Answer

  9. You are a network consultant, and Mark is the network administrator for one of your clients. The client's network consists of eight Windows 2000 Servers, four of which are domain controllers. All of the clients use Windows 2000 Professional workstations as the clients. Mark contacts you to tell you that he has added an older network card into one of the member servers to allow it to serve as a Proxy for the network. Upon investigation, you discover that the older network card is not Plug-and-Play-compliant, and is conflicting with system's resources. What are likely solutions to this problem? (Choose all that apply.)

    1. Change the system resources within the BIOS.
    2. Change the system resources through Device Manager for the new NIC.
    3. Change the system resources through jumpers on the card.
    4. Throw the card in the trash, and make Mark purchase a newer network card.

    Answer

  10. You are troubleshooting a PCI network card that has failed to start on a Windows 2000 Server. The server has two 1.1Ghz processors, 1GB of RAM, and five 80GB hard drives configured with RAID-5. Of the following, which two can offer information on why the card is not starting?

    1. Device Manager
    2. Disk Management
    3. TCP/IP Properties
    4. Event Viewer

    Answer

  11. You are the network administrator for Winston Associates. Your domain consists of three Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, two Windows 2000 Server member servers, and 98 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. Your assistant, Martha, has just called to report that an unusual event is being recorded in the Event Viewer's System Log. Upon further investigation, she reports that the an entry has been recorded three times in the last hour with the event of "eventlog". What caused this entry?

    1. This entry is the recording of the log file being purged and restarted.
    2. This entry is the recording of the log file for the System log being purged and restarted.
    3. This entry is the recording of the Event log being restarted. This was caused by the Server service being restarted.
    4. This entry is the recording of the Event log being restarted. This was caused by the server being restarted.

    Answer

  12. You are the network administrator for Winston Associates. Your domain consists of three Windows 2000 Servers acting as domain controllers, two Windows 2000 Server member servers, and 98 Windows 2000 Professional workstations. You discover that that the NIC on one of your member servers is no longer working. You have checked and verified that the cable is connected and working fine. The correct driver is installed, and the Event Viewer has no record of the server being restarted on services being stopped. What do you suspect is the problem, and what should you do next?

    1. The card has failed. Replace the NIC.
    2. The card's driver is no longer valid. Reinstall the card's driver.
    3. The card's driver is no longer valid. Update the card through Device Manager.
    4. Windows has lost connection to the NIC. Restart the server.

    Answer

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