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Commands for Configuring the RPM

This section describes the commands you use to configure the RPM:

  • enable—Accesses privileged EXEC mode. This command might require a password.

  • show running-config—Displays the running configuration file.

  • show startup-config—Displays the startup configuration file.

  • copy—Copies a configuration file from one location to another.

  • reload—Resets the RPM and loads the Cisco IOS image.

  • configure terminal—Enters configuration mode so that you can modify a configuration file.

  • boot system—Defines the location and filename of the IOS image for the RPM to boot from.

  • hostname—Sets the RPM host name.

  • enable password—Defines an enable password.

  • line—Defines a user access line.

  • password—Defines a user access line password.

  • rpmrscprtn—Defines the resource partitions on the RPM.

Enable Command

The enable command starts privileged EXEC mode on the IOS CLI. Many of the commands for the RPM require that you be in privileged EXEC mode. The enable command might require a password.

When you enter privileged EXEC mode, the CLI prompt changes from hostname> to hostname#.

Show Running Configuration and Show Startup Configuration Commands

The show running-config and show startup-config commands output the running or startup configuration files. Use these commands to verify the RPM's configuration.

The output is often several screens in length. Use the Spacebar to move forward one screen; use the Enter key to move forward one line.

Example 22-16 shows the first of three screens for the show running-config output.

Example 22-16 show running-config Output, Page 1

Current configuration:
!
version 12.1
no service pad
service timestamps debug uptime
service timestamps log uptime
no service password-encryption
!
hostname rpm01
!
boot system c:rpm-js-mz.120-2.5.T
boot system c:rpm-js-mz.121-3.T
enable password cisco
!
!
!
!
!
ip subnet-zero
!
cns event-service server
!
!
!

Example 22-17 shows the second of three screens for the show running-config output.

Example 22-17 show running-config Output, Page 2

interface Ethernet2/1
 no ip address
 no ip route-cache
 no ip mroute-cache
 shutdown
!
interface Ethernet2/2
 no ip address
 no ip route-cache
 no ip mroute-cache
 shutdown
!
interface Ethernet2/3
 no ip address
 no ip route-cache
 no ip mroute-cache
 shutdown
!
interface Ethernet2/4
 no ip address
 no ip route-cache
 no ip mroute-cache
 shutdown
!

Example 22-18 shows the third of three screens for the show running-config output.

Example 22-18 show running-config Output, Page 3

interface Switch1
 no ip address
 no ip route-cache
 no ip mroute-cache
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
!
!
ip classless
no ip http server
!
!
!
line con 0
 transport input none
line aux 0
line vty 0 4
 password cisco
 no login
!
rpmrscprtn PAR 100 100 0 255 0 3840 4000
addcon auto_synch off
end

Copy Command

The copy command copies a configuration file to a specified location. For example, you can save the running configuration file to the PXM1 hard drive. Use this command to save changes to the running configuration. In some cases, you are prompted to confirm the copy command.

Here is the copy command syntax:

copy <source> <destination>

Both the source and destination can be specified as the following:

  • running-config—The running configuration stored in RAM.

  • startup-config—The startup configuration stored in NVRAM.

  • c:filename—A configuration file named filename is stored on the PXM1 hard drive in the RPM subdirectory.

  • tftp—A configuration file stored on a remote TFTP server. If you use this keyword, you are prompted for additional information, including the server's name or IP address and the filename.

For example, type copy running-config startup-config to copy the running configuration to the startup configuration. Type copy startup-config c:start_lab_test to copy the startup configuration to the PXM1 hard drive with a filename of start_lab_test.

Reload Command

The reload command reboots the RPM and loads the IOS image as specified in the startup configuration. Use this command after you configure the RPM to load the IOS image from the PXM1 hard drive.

You are prompted to confirm the reload. If the new IOS image is significantly different from the previous one, some configuration on the RPM might be changed or lost. Use caution when using this command.

Configure Terminal Command

The configure terminal command starts configuration mode from the terminal (CLI). Use this command when you want to change the RPM running configuration. When you start configuration mode, the CLI prompt changes from hostname# to hostname (config)#. You must be in privileged EXEC mode to issue the configure terminal command.

When you start configuration mode, you can make general configuration changes that affect the RPM as a whole (global configuration mode). You can make specific configuration changes by specifying an element on the RPM, such as an Ethernet interface. The CLI prompt changes to reflect the specific configuration mode. For an interface, the CLI prompt changes to hostname(config-if)#. Use the exit command to end a specific configuration mode.

After you finish making configuration changes, press Ctrl-Z to exit configuration mode. Remember to use the copy command if you want to save the changes to anywhere other than the running configuration.

Boot System Command

The boot system command specifies the IOS image that the RPM should load on startup. In most cases, you configure the RPM to load the IOS image from the PXM1 hard drive. It is possible to store the IOS image at other locations, such as a TFTP server. You must be in global configuration mode to use the boot system command.

Here is the boot system command syntax:

boot system c:filename

filename is the name of the IOS image on the PXM1 hard drive. The file must be in the RPM subdirectory on the PXM1.

For example, type boot system c:rpm-js-mz.121-5.3.T_XT to load the IOS image file rpm-js-mz.121-5.3.T_XT from the PXM1 hard drive.

Hostname Command

The hostname command sets the RPM host name. You must be in global configuration mode to use the hostname command.

Here is the hostname command syntax:

hostname <hostname>

hostname is a character string less than 63 characters in length. The host name must start with a letter, end with a letter or number, and have as interior characters only letters, digits, and hyphens. Valid host names are router, RPM-cardslot9, and San-Jose5. Host names 5-san-jose, san jose 5, and RPM#9.2 are invalid.

Enable Password Command

The enable password global configuration command sets a privileged EXEC password. It is recommended that you set up an enable password to prevent unauthorized users from changing the RPM configuration. You must set up an enable password if you want to remotely access the RPM CLI in any way (from the PXM1 or using Telnet) except from the console port on the RPM front card.

Here is the enable password command syntax:

enable password {0 | 7 | level} [level-number] <password>

The keyword and parameter options are as follows:

  • 0—An unencrypted password follows. If no option is specified, the password is encrypted and is not hidden.

  • 7—A hidden password follows. If no option is specified, the password is encrypted and is not hidden.

  • level—Specifies a user EXEC-level password.

  • level-number—The user EXEC level between 1 and 15.

  • password—The password character string.

For example, type enable password 0 cisco=enable to change the enable password (unencrypted) to cisco=enable; type enable password 123dog to change the enable password (encrypted) to 123dog.

Line Command

The line global configuration command sets up user access lines on the RPM. The line command also starts line-specific configuration mode. When you are in this mode, you can change the access characteristics, such as the password, session timers, and event logging. You must set up user access lines to remotely access the RPM CLI.

NOTE

Vty ports must be configured with a password before you can cc to the RPM card.

Here is the line command syntax:

line {aux | console | vty} <first-line-number> <last-line-number>

The keyword and parameter options are as follows:

  • aux—Configures the RPM auxiliary port.

  • console—Configures the RPM console port.

  • vty—Configures a virtual terminal. Virtual terminal lines include Telnet and PXM1 CLI sessions.

  • first-line-number—The first line number of a range. Up to six virtual terminal lines are supported. The RPM auxiliary and console ports are always line number 0.

  • last-line-number—The last line number of a range. This parameter is not specified for RPM auxiliary and console ports.

For example, type line vty 0 4 to configure virtual terminal lines 0 to 4; type line console 0 to configure the RPM console port.

Password Command

The password line-specific configuration command sets a password for accessing the RPM CLI from a line (auxiliary, console, or virtual terminal). You must specify a password for virtual terminal lines on the RPM if you want to remotely access the RPM CLI.

Here is the password command syntax:

password {0 | 7} <password>

The keyword and parameter options are as follows:

  • 0—An unencrypted password follows. If no option is specified, the password is encrypted and is not hidden.

  • 7—A hidden password follows. If no option is specified, the password is encrypted and is not hidden.

  • password—The password character string.

For example, type password 0 CLIpassword to change the password (unencrypted) to CLIpassword; type password mgx8850-2 to change the enable password (encrypted) to mgx8850-2.

RPM Resource Partition Command

Similar to other card modules in the MGX switch, the RPM must have resource partitions configured. The rpmrscprtn global configuration command sets up the partitions on the RPM. You must set up partitions before you can configure any connections on the RPM.

Here is the rpmrscprtn command syntax:

rpmrscprtn {par | tag | pnni} <ingress-percent> <egress-percent>
  <minimum-VPI> <maximum-VPI> <minimum-VCI> <maximum-VCI> <LCNS>

The keyword and parameter options are as follows:

  • par (Portable AutoRoute), tag (MPLS), or pnni—The controller type you want to define.

  • ingress-percent—The percentage of the ingress bandwidth on the ATM switch interface that can be allocated by the controller type. The aggregate of the ingress bandwidth across all three controllers can exceed 100 percent.

  • egress-percent—The percentage of the egress bandwidth on the ATM switch interface that can be allocated by the controller type. The aggregate of the egress bandwidth across all three controllers can exceed 100 percent.

  • minimum-VPI—The minimum VPI value that can be assigned on PVCs on this controller. The VPI ranges on the three controllers can overlap. Valid values are from 0 to 255.

  • maximum-VPI—The maximum VPI value that can be assigned on PVCs on this controller. The VPI ranges on the three controllers can overlap. Valid values are from 0 to 255.

  • minimum-VCI—The minimum VCI value that can be assigned on PVCs on this controller. The VCI ranges on the three controllers can overlap. Valid values are from 0 to 3840.

  • maximum-VCI—The maximum VCI value that can be assigned on PVCs on this controller. The VCI ranges on the three controllers can overlap. Valid values are from 0 to 3840.

  • LCNS—The total number of logical connections that can use this controller. Valid values are from 0 to 4047.

For example, type rpmrscprtn par 100 100 0 255 0 3840 4047 to allow the PAR controller access to the full range of resources.

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