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Exchange 2000 Exam 70-224

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Considering Exam 70-224: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server? This exam will test your ability to implement, administer, and troubleshoot Exchange 2000 Server. Once you've got a grasp on Windows 2000's AD, you'll still need plenty of hands-on experience with Exchange 2000. This is one tough exam. Take a look at the exam objectives and a few study strategies in this article by Joseph Phillips.
Joseph Phillips writes a weekly column on professional certification for InformIT. See all of Joe's articles on Joe's author page.

Remember when you'd write a letter by hand, stuff it into an envelope, smack a stamp on it, and drop it in the mailbox? Ah yes, the good old days. That red flag popping up by your mailbox to signal a letter was waiting for delivery. When was the last time you sent a letter? And what's the ratio of e-mails to letters you send today? Probably weighted more toward e-mail, I'd wager. That's why a certification in Exchange 2000 would be a good thing -- it is the future. I only wish I could lick more stamps.

Of course, Exchange 2000 isn't just e-mail. There's Chat, Instant Messaging, Active Directory integration, and more fun stuff.

If you've worked with Exchange 5.5 and are thinking about upgrading your certification to Exchange 2000, do yourself a favor: know Active Directory first. Exchange 2000 requires Active Directory (AD) to even install. And Exchange 2000, unlike its predecessor, stores its information in AD, rather than in a separate database.

This exam will test your ability to implement, administer, and troubleshoot Exchange 2000 Server. Once you've got a grasp on Windows 2000's AD, you'll still need plenty of hands-on experience with Exchange 2000. This is one tough exam. Let's take a look at the exam objectives and a few study strategies.

Installing and Upgrading Exchange 2000 Server

Well, well, what a surprise. Obviously, you'll need to install Exchange 2000 Server to pass this exam. Which means you'll need that foundation of Active Directory and the knowledge to integrate Exchange objects with AD.

Anyone who's installed Exchange under pressure and with time constraints knows that installations will fail. You'll need a strategy to diagnose and resolve the failed installs. This means using the /disasterrecovery switch to reinstall Exchange.

As Windows NT 4.0 domains are upgraded to Windows 2000 networks, it is logical to expect the Exchange 5.5 Servers to be upgraded, too. You'll need to know how to complete the upgrade of 5.5 servers to 2000. This includes prepping a 5.5 server and recovering from any disasters that may occur during the upgrade process.

Many networks won't migrate all of the Exchange 5.5 Servers immediately -- or ever -- so you'll need to know how to get Exchange 5.5 and Exchange 2000 to play nice together. You should spend time with the Active Directory Connector (ADC), which is a primary tool for allowing Exchange 5.5 and Exchange 2000 to work together. It allows the objects in the Exchange 5.5 directory to be incorporated with AD so that Exchange 2000 can access and interact with Exchange 5.5.

This objective also requires a working knowledge of how to deploy and configure clients such as Microsoft Outlook 2000, Outlook Web Access, POP3, IMAP4, and IRC. Hands-on experience will ensure success with this objective.

Study Hint:

Spend time working with the /disasterrecovery switch, the /forestprep switch, and the /domainprep switch.

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