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This chapter is from the book 11.2 Resource Pooling Architecture

11.2 Resource Pooling Architecture

A resource pooling architecture is based on the use of one or more resource pools, in which identical IT resources are grouped and maintained by a system that automatically ensures that they remain synchronized.

Provided here are common examples of resource pools:

Physical server pools are composed of networked servers that have been installed with operating systems and other necessary programs and/or applications and are ready for immediate use.

Virtual server pools are usually configured using one of several available templates chosen by the cloud consumer during provisioning. For example, a cloud consumer can set up a pool of mid-tier Windows servers with 4 GB of RAM or a pool of low-tier Ubuntu servers with 2 GB of RAM.

Storage pools, or cloud storage device pools, consist of file-based or block-based storage structures that contain empty and/or filled cloud storage devices.

Network pools (or interconnect pools) are composed of different preconfigured network connectivity devices. For example, a pool of virtual firewall devices or physical network switches can be created for redundant connectivity, load balancing, or link aggregation.

CPU pools are ready to be allocated to virtual servers, and are typically broken down into individual processing cores.

Pools of physical RAM can be used in newly provisioned physical servers or to vertically scale physical servers.

Dedicated pools can be created for each type of IT resource and individual pools can be grouped into a larger pool, in which case each individual pool becomes a sub-pool (Figure 11.2).

Figure 11.2 A sample resource pool that is comprised of four sub-pools of CPUs, memory, cloud storage devices, and virtual network devices.

Resource pools can become highly complex, with multiple pools created for specific cloud consumers or applications. A hierarchical structure can be established to form parent, sibling, and nested pools in order to facilitate the organization of diverse resource pooling requirements (Figure 11.3).

Figure 11.3 Pools B and C are sibling pools that are taken from the larger Pool A, which has been allocated to a cloud consumer. This is an alternative to taking the IT resources for Pool B and Pool C from a general reserve of IT resources that is shared throughout the cloud.

Sibling resource pools are usually drawn from physically grouped IT resources, as opposed to IT resources that are spread out over different data centers. Sibling pools are isolated from one another so that each cloud consumer is only provided access to its respective pool.

In the nested pool model, larger pools are divided into smaller pools that individually group the same type of IT resources together (Figure 11.4). Nested pools can be used to assign resource pools to different departments or groups in the same cloud consumer organization.

Figure 11.4 Nested Pools A.1 and Pool A.2 are comprised of the same IT resources as Pool A, but in different quantities. Nested pools are typically used to provision cloud services that need to be rapidly instantiated using the same type of IT resources with the same configuration settings.

After resources pools have been defined, multiple instances of IT resources from each pool can be created to provide an in-memory pool of “live” IT resources.

In addition to cloud storage devices and virtual servers, which are commonly pooled mechanisms, the following mechanisms can also be part of this cloud architecture:

  • Audit Monitor – This mechanism monitors resource pool usage to ensure compliance with privacy and regulation requirements, especially when pools contain cloud storage devices or data loaded into memory.
  • Cloud Usage Monitor – Various cloud usage monitors are involved in the runtime tracking and synchronization that are required by the pooled IT resources and any underlying management systems.
  • Hypervisor – The hypervisor mechanism is responsible for providing virtual servers with access to resource pools, in addition to hosting the virtual servers and sometimes the resource pools themselves.
  • Logical Network Perimeter – The logical network perimeter is used to logically organize and isolate resource pools.
  • Pay-Per-Use Monitor – The pay-per-use monitor collects usage and billing information on how individual cloud consumers are allocated and use IT resources from various pools.
  • Remote Administration System – This mechanism is commonly used to interface with backend systems and programs in order to provide resource pool administration features via a front-end portal.
  • Resource Management System – The resource management system mechanism supplies cloud consumers with the tools and permission management options for administering resource pools.
  • Resource Replication – This mechanism is used to generate new instances of IT resources for resource pools.
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