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Running James

To run James, make sure that your JAVA_HOME environment variable points to the JRE 1.4 home directory. Then execute the run.bat script from the bin directory where you extracted James (see Figure 1). When you do this, you should see that James is listening to ports 25 and 110 (for SMTP and POP3 services).

Figure 1Figure 1 Starting James.

When you first run James, configuration files are created for you. At this point, you have to stop the server to modify the configuration files to get some useful functionality out of James.

You need to teach James to respect the domain for which you're trying to set up e-mail. To do this, you need to modify the section of the config.xml file (located in the <james-installdir>\apps\james\SAR-INF directory) as follows:

<servernames autodetect="true" autodetectIP="true">
<!-- CONFIRM? -->
<servername>localhost</servername>
</servernames> 

You need to add the DNS namespace for which James will handle mail. For example, suppose that you want to handle mail for bogusdomain.com. The syntax would be the following:

<servernames autodetect="true" autodetectIP="true">
<!-- CONFIRM? -->
<servername>localhost</servername>
<servername>bogusdomain.com</servername>
</servernames>

Note that you simply just can't start receiving mail for a given domain. The DNS records and Mail Exchanger (MX) records of that domain should point to the IP address that the box running James is associated with. If you're using a router, your router should redirect port traffic (for example, for SMTP, POP3, and Remote Manager Service requests) from your WAN IP address to the LAN IP address of the machine that's running James.

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