Home > Articles > Web Services

  • Print
  • + Share This
This chapter is from the book

Configuration Maximum Differences from VI3

We already covered many of the features and enhancements in vSphere and how they differ from VI3, but there are also many maximum configuration differences that you should be aware of. VMware publishes a configuration maximum document for each version that lists the maximums for VMs, hosts, and vCenter Servers. vSphere saw a number of these maximums increase, which really made a big difference in how well it could scale and the workloads it could handle. Tables 1.1 and 1.2 display the key configuration maximum differences between VI 3.5 and vSphere.

Table 1.1. Virtual Machine Configuration Maximum Differences

Virtual Machine

VI 3.5

vSphere 4

Virtual CPUs per VM

4

8

RAM per VM

64GB

255GB

NICs per VM

4

10

Concurrent remote console sessions

10

40

Table 1.2. ESX Host and vCenter Server Configuration Maximum Differences

ESX Host and vCenter Server

VI 3.5

vSphere 4

Hosts per storage volume

32

64

Fibre Channel paths to LUN

32

16

NFS datastores

32

64

Hardware iSCSI initiators per host

2

4

Virtual CPUs per host

192

512

VMs per host

170

320

Logical processors per host

32

64

RAM per host

256GB

1TB

Standard vSwitches per host

127

248

vNICs per standard vSwitch

1,016

4,088

Resource pools per host

512

4,096

Children per resource pool

256

1,024

Resource pools per cluster

128

512

The biggest differences in vSphere are the number of VMs that you can have per host and the amount of RAM and number of CPUs that you can assign to a VM. There is an important caveat to the number of VMs per host, though: If you have a single cluster that exceeds more than eight hosts, you can have only 40 VMs per host. Be aware of this limitation when sizing your host hardware and designing your virtual environment.

  • + Share This
  • 🔖 Save To Your Account