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This chapter is from the book

This chapter is from the book

Working with the Brush and Airbrush Tools

Photoshop’s Brush and Airbrush tools were designed to reproduce the visual effect of applying paint to a canvas. You have full control over the brush tip, color, size, opacity, and even the brush’s blending mode. Control over the image is achieved by using additional layers to hold the brush strokes—but remember, adding additional layers increases the file size of a Photoshop document. Since layers have their own individual options, such as opacity, fill, and blending modes, you achieve even greater control over the final design by giving brush strokes their own layers. Once the brush stroke is to your liking, you can always merge the brush-stroke layer into the image to conserve file size.

Work with the Brush and Airbrush Tools

  • blue-circle1.jpg Select the Brush tool on the toolbox.
  • blue-circle2.jpg Select a brush tip on the Options bar or from the Brush panel.
  • blue-circle3.jpg Specify Paint Engine options for the brush from the Brush panel.
  • blue-circle4.jpg Select from the following Brush options on the Options bar:
    • Mode. Click the list arrow to choose from the available blending modes. The blending modes controls how the active brush color blends with the colors in the active image.

    • Opacity. Enter an opacity percent (1% to 100%), or click the list arrow, and then drag the slider left or right.

    • Flow. Enter a flow percentage (1% to 100%), or click the list arrow, and then drag the slider left or right. When you apply the brush, Flow controls the amount of ink supplied to the brush.

    • Airbrush. Click the button to change the Brush into an Airbrush.

  • blue-circle5.jpg Drag within the image to paint.
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