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Floating-Point Literals

Floating-point numbers can be represented in a number of ways. The following are all legitimate floating-point numbers:

1003.45

.00100345e6

100.345E+1100345e–2

1.00345e3

0.00100345e+6

 


Floating-point literals have several parts, which appear in the following order as shown in Table 3.9.

Table 3.9 Floating-Point Literal Requirements

Part

Is It Required?

Examples

Whole Number

Not if fractional part is present.

0, 1, 100, 1003

Decimal Point

Not if exponent is present; must be there if there is a fractional part.

 

Fractional

Cannot be present if there is no decimal point; must be there if there is no whole number part.

0, 1, 1415927

Exponent

Only if there is no decimal point.

e23, E–19, E6, e+307, e–1

Type Suffix

No. The number is assumed to be double precision in the absence of a type suffix.

f, F, d, D


The following representations illustrate the ways you can specify a floating-point literal that is consistent with the requirements in Table 3.9:

1.234

(Whole Number) . (Fractional)

1E2

(Whole Number)(Exponent)

1.234F

(Whole Number) . (Fractional)(Type Suffix)

1E2D

(Whole Number)(Exponent)(Type Suffix)


The following restrictions apply to floating-point literals:

  • Single precision floating-point literals produce compile-time errors if their values are non-zero and have an absolute value outside the range 1.40239846e–45f through 3.40282347e+38f.

  • Double precision floating-point literals produce compile-time errors if their values are non-zero and have an absolute value outside the range 4.94065645841246544e–324 through 1.7976931348623157e+308.

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