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Example 2

A manufacturer purchases material from a firm that collects discarded material from other manufacturers and resells it. All the material was diverted from the solid waste stream and is not normally reused by industry within the original manufacturing process. The manufacturer includes the weight of this material in its calculations of the recycled content of its products. A claim of recycled content based on this calculation is not deceptive because, absent the purchase and reuse of this material, it would have entered the waste stream.

Example 3

A greeting card is composed 30 percent by fiber weight of paper collected from consumers after use of a paper product and 20 percent by fiber weight of paper that was generated after completion of the paper-making process, diverted from the solid waste stream, and otherwise would not normally have been reused in the original manufacturing process. The marketer of the card might claim that the product “contains 50 percent recycled fiber,” or he might identify the specific pre-consumer and post-consumer content by stating, for example, that the product “contains 50 percent total recycled fiber, including 30 percent post-consumer.”

Example 4

A paperboard package with 20 percent recycled fiber by weight is labeled as containing “20 percent recycled fiber.” Some of the recycled content was composed of material collected from consumers after use of the original product. The rest was composed of overrun newspaper stock never sold to customers. The claim is not deceptive.

Example 5

A product in a multicomponent package, such as a paperboard box in a shrink-wrapped plastic cover, indicates that it has recycled packaging. The paperboard box is made entirely of recycled material, but the plastic cover is not. The claim is deceptive because, without qualification, it suggests that both components are recycled. A claim limited to the paperboard box is not deceptive.

Example 6

A package is made from layers of foil, plastic, and paper laminated together, although the layers are indistinguishable to consumers. The label

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