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This chapter is from the book

This chapter is from the book

1.10 Further Reading

Risk analysis arises in a variety of contexts. Molak [646] presents essays on risk management and analysis in a variety of fields. Laudan [552] provides an enjoyable introduction to the subject. Neumann [688] discusses the risks of technology and recent problems. Software safety (Leveson [557]) requires an understanding of the risks posed in the environment. Peterson [717] discusses many programming errors in a readable way. All provide insights into the problems that arise in a variety of environments.

Many authors recount stories of security incidents. The earliest, Parker's wonderful book [713], discusses motives and personalities as well as technical details. Stoll recounts the technical details of uncovering an espionage ring that began as the result of a 75¢ accounting error [878, 880]. Hafner and Markoff describe the same episode in a study of "cyberpunks" [386]. The Internet worm [292, 386, 757, 858] brought the problem of computer security into popular view. Numerous other incidents [339, 386, 577, 821, 838, 873] have heightened public awareness of the problem.

Several books [55, 57, 737, 799] discuss computer security for the layperson. These works tend to focus on attacks that are visible or affect the end user (such as pornography, theft of credit card information, and deception). They are worth reading for those who wish to understand the results of failures in computer security.

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