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Stapleton:DSDM_c

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About

Features

  • Practical guidelines on the implementation of key elements of the method such as "timeboxes" and the MOSCOW Rule
  • Clear recommendations for the roles and responsibilities of the members of the development tea
  • Advice on which type of application is most likely to benefit from the metho
  • Eight lengthy case studies by well-known companies, providing a benchmark against which to assess the suitability of candidate project
  • Numerous examples and anecdotes, enabling the reader to benefit from the author's experience putting the method into practice

 

Description

  • Copyright 1997
  • Edition: 1st
  • Book
  • ISBN-10: 0-201-17889-3
  • ISBN-13: 978-0-201-17889-0

DSDM is about people, not tools. It is about truly understanding the needs of a business, delivering software solutions that work and delivering them as quickly and as cheaply as possible.

The Dynamic Systems Development Method provides a framework of controls and best practice for Rapid Application Development. It was created by a consortium of organisations and it has been proved, since its publication in January 1995, to be extremely effective in delivering maintainable systems which match the needs of the business better than those produced using traditional lifecycles.

This book, commissioned by the DSDM Consortium and written by the chairman of the Technical Committee which developed the method, explores the day-to-day realities of implementing the method. It is a practitionerIs guide, dealing with issues such as how to get people from different disciplines to work together as a team, how to gain commitment and how to manage projects within normal business constraints.

In this book you will find:
  • practical guidelines on the implementation of key elements of the method such as "timeboxes" and the MOSCOW Rules
  • clear recommendations for the roles and responsibilities of the members of the development team
  • advice on which type of application is most likely to benefit from the method
  • eight lengthy case studies by well-known companies, providing a benchmark against which to assess the suitability of candidate projects
  • numerous examples and anecdotes, enabling the reader to benefit from the authorIs experience putting the method into practice

Do you want to cut the development time and increase the fitness-for-use of screen based business applications, by orders of magnitude?

This book will enable those in organisations which develop or purchase tailored IT systems, to gain a clear understanding of the benefits of the incremental and iterative approach embodied in the DSDM.



0201178893B04062001

Sample Content

Table of Contents



Introduction.

Background.

Some definitions.

A bit of history.

Overview of the method.

Why is DSDM more rapid than the waterfall?

About this book.

I. THE METHOD.

1. DSDM process overview.

Introduction.

The feasibility study.

The business study.

Functional model iteration.

Design and build iteration.

Implementation.

Key points.

2. The underlying principles.

Key points.

3. The process in action.

When to use DSDM.

The reality of iteration and incremental delivery.

Analysis and design techniques.

Key points.

4. Time versus functionality.

Fitting quarts into pint pots.

Timeboxes.

MoSCow rules.

Controlling timebox activity.

To timebox or not?

The disaster scenario.

Key points.

5. The RAD project manager in action.

What is different?

Planning a DSDM project.

The project roles.

Project structures.

Monitoring progress.

Workload.

Key points.

6. Impact on the organization.

Making decisions.

User involvement.

Better communication.

Joint application design (JAD) workshops.

Training users.

Key points.

7. Never mind the quality?

'Good enough' software.

Building in quality.

Testing.

DSDM and TicklT.

New procedures for old.

The capability maturity model.

Key points.

8. The RAD professional.

`No more quick and dirty'.

Skills and attributes.

Self-management.

Key points.

9. Prototyping is not a waste of time.

Bridging the language barriers.

But the users keep changing their minds!

Categories of prototypes.

Getting effective feedback.

Keeping control.

Key points.

10. Technology support.

The need for technology support.

DSDM support environments.

Testing tools.

Configuration management tools.

Effective tool usage.

Key points.

II. CASE STUDIES.

11. A measured DSDM project—BT.

The approach to DSDM.

Quality and testing.

Training and team building.

Project roles and planning.

External relationships—managing critical interactions.

The project diary.

Project data.

Effort and resource data.

The team's perceptions of the project.

The unit's perception of DSDM and the project.

Conclusions and lessons learnt.

Appendix: Results of the project review meeting.

What worked well.

What worked less well—lessons, issues, questions.

12. How not to do RAD.

The project.

What had gone wrong?

So what did he do?

13. A customer view—Scottish Natural Heritage.

The project.

14. Project support—PGT Consultants.

Background.

The project.

Briefing for workshop participants.

Initial workshop.

The project reviews.

Summary.

15. An early adopter case study—Sysdeco.

Introduction.

The project.

16. Assessing the quality aspects of DSDM—Sema Group.

Introduction.

Background.

British Midland.

Diamond Club redevelopment.

How DSDM was applied.

User involvement.

Feasibility study.

Estimating.

Business study.

Project management.

Functional model iteration.

Prototype management.

Testing.

Design and build iteration.

Configuration management.

Quality assurance.

Implementation.

The business benefit for BM.

What Sema Group has learned.

17. Applying DSDM to a batch and online system upgrade—Orange.

Introduction.

Lifecycle/process framework.

Orange design process.

User involvement.

Orange development process.

Orange testing process.

Conclusions.

Appendix.

18. A pre-DSDM RAD project.

Introduction.

Background.

Technical environment.

System description.

Project planning and organization.

Compare and contrast with DSDM.

End users.

Compare and contrast with DSDM.

Phase 1—initial fact-finding, first design and prototype.

Compare and contrast with DSDM.

Phase 2—iterative prototyping, further design.

Compare and contrast with DSDM.

Phase 3—delivery and documentation.

Compare and contrast with DSDM.

Lessons learnt.

Conclusion.

III. INFORMATION.

19. Where do I go from here?

Contact the DSDM Consortium.

Get trained.

A mentor is essential.

IV. APPENDIX.

Appendix A: Documenting the controls.

Development process.

System level.

Timebox level.

Development (design) timeboxes.

Investigative/analytical timeboxes.

Postscript.

References.

Index.

Updates

Submit Errata

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