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Routing and Switching Essentials v6 Course Booklet

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Features

  • A low-cost, text-only booklet of the course narrative for easy offline studying
  • Easy to read, highlight, and review on the go, wherever the Internet is not available.
  • Extracted directly from the online course, with headings that have exact page correlations to the online course
  • An icon system directs the reader to the online course to take full advantage of the images, labs, Packet Tracer activities, and dynamic activities

Description

  • Copyright 2017
  • Dimensions: 8-1/2" x 10-7/8"
  • Pages: 272
  • Edition: 1st
  • Book
  • ISBN-10: 1-58713-427-6
  • ISBN-13: 978-1-58713-427-2

Routing and Switching Essentials v6 Course Booklet


Your Cisco Networking Academy Course Booklet is designed as a study resource you can easily read, highlight, and review on the go, wherever the Internet is not available or practical:

·         The text is extracted directly, word-for-word, from the online course so you can highlight important points and take notes in the “Your Chapter Notes” section.

·         Headings with the exact page correlations provide a quick reference to the online course for your classroom discussions and exam preparation.

·         An icon system directs you to the online curriculum to take full advantage of the images embedded within the Networking Academy online course interface and reminds you to do the labs, interactive activities, packet tracer activities, watch videos, and take the chapter quizzes.

The Course Booklet is a basic, economical paper-based resource to help you succeed with the Cisco Networking Academy online course.

Related titles:

Routing and Switching Essentials v6 Companion Guide

book: 978-1-58713-428-9

eBook: 978-0-13-466965-6

Routing & Switching Essentials v6 Labs & Study Guide

book: 978-1-58713-426-5

CCNA Routing and Switching Portable Command Guide, Fourth Edition

book: 978-1-58720-588-0

eBook: 978-0-13-446617-0

Sample Content

Table of Contents

Chapter 0 Course Introduction 1

0.0 Welcome to Routing and Switching Essentials 1

    0.0.1 Message to the Student 1

    0.0.1.1 Welcome 1

    0.0.1.2 A Global Community 1

    0.0.1.3 More Than Just Information 1

    0.0.1.4 How We Teach 2

    0.0.1.5 Practice Leads to Mastery 2

    0.0.1.6 Mind Wide Open 2

    0.0.1.7 Engineering Journals 2

    0.0.1.8 Explore the World of Networking 2

    0.0.1.9 Create Your Own Worlds 2

    0.0.1.10 How Packet Tracer Helps Master Concepts 3

    0.0.1.11 Course Overview 3

Chapter 1 Routing Concepts 5

1.0 Introduction 5

        1.0.1.1 Routing Concepts 5

        1.0.1.2 Activity — Do We Really Need a Map? 5

1.1 Router Initial Configuration 6

    1.1.1 Router Functions 6

        1.1.1.1 Characteristics of a Network 6

        1.1.1.2 Why Routing? 7

        1.1.1.3 Routers Are Computers 7

        1.1.1.4 Routers Interconnect Networks 8

        1.1.1.5 Routers Choose Best Paths 8

        1.1.1.6 Packet Forwarding Mechanisms 9

        1.1.1.7 Activity — Identify Router Components 10

        1.1.1.8 Packet Tracer — Using Traceroute to Discover the Network 10

        1.1.1.9 Lab — Mapping the Internet 10

    1.1.2 Connect Devices 10

        1.1.2.1 Connect to a Network 10

        1.1.2.2 Default Gateways 11

        1.1.2.3 Document Network Addressing 12

        1.1.2.4 Enable IP on a Host 12

        1.1.2.5 Device LEDs 13

        1.1.2.6 Console Access 13

        1.1.2.7 Enable IP on a Switch 14

        1.1.2.8 Activity — Document an Addressing Scheme 14

        1.1.2.9 Packet Tracer — Documenting the Network 14

    1.1.3 Router Basic Settings 14

        1.1.3.1 Configure Basic Router Settings 14

        1.1.3.2 Configure an IPv4 Router Interface 15

        1.1.3.3 Configure an IPv6 Router Interface 15

        1.1.3.4 Configure an IPv4 Loopback Interface 16

        1.1.3.5 Packet Tracer — Configuring IPv4 and IPv6 Interfaces 17

    1.1.4 Verify Connectivity of Directly Connected Networks 17

        1.1.4.1 Verify Interface Settings 17

        1.1.4.2 Verify IPv6 Interface Settings 18

        1.1.4.3 Filter Show Command Output 19

        1.1.4.4 Command History Feature 19

        1.1.4.5 Packet Tracer — Configuring and Verifying a Small Network 20

        1.1.4.6 Lab — Configuring Basic Router Settings with IOS CLI 20

1.2 Routing Decisions 20

    1.2.1 Switching Packets Between Networks 20

        1.2.1.1 Router Switching Function 20

        1.2.1.2 Send a Packet 21

        1.2.1.3 Forward to the Next Hop 21

        1.2.1.4 Packet Routing 22

        1.2.1.5 Reach the Destination 23

        1.2.1.6 Activity — Match Layer 2 and Layer 3 Addressing 23

    1.2.2 Path Determination 23

        1.2.2.1 Routing Decisions 23

        1.2.2.2 Best Path 24

        1.2.2.3 Load Balancing 24

        1.2.2.4 Administrative Distance 25

        1.2.2.5 Activity — Order the Steps in the Packet Forwarding Process 25

        1.2.2.6 Activity — Match the Administrative Distance to the Route Source 25

1.3 Router Operation 25

    1.3.1 Analyze the Routing Table 25

        1.3.1.1 The Routing Table 25

        1.3.1.2 Routing Table Sources 26

        1.3.1.3 Remote Network Routing Entries 27

        1.3.1.4 Activity — Interpret the Content of a Routing Table Entry 27

    1.3.2 Directly Connected Routes 27

        1.3.2.1 Directly Connected Interfaces 27

        1.3.2.2 Directly Connected Routing Table Entries 27

        1.3.2.3 Directly Connected Examples 28

        1.3.2.4 Directly Connected IPv6 Example 28

        1.3.2.5 Packet Tracer — Investigating Directly Connected Routes 29

    1.3.3 Statically Learned Routes 29

        1.3.3.1 Static Routes 29

        1.3.3.2 Static Route Examples 29

        1.3.3.3 Static IPv6 Route Examples 30

    1.3.4 Dynamic Routing Protocols 31

        1.3.4.1 Dynamic Routing 31

        1.3.4.2 IPv4 Routing Protocols 31

        1.3.4.3 IPv4 Dynamic Routing Examples 31

        1.3.4.4 IPv6 Routing Protocols 32

        1.3.4.5 IPv6 Dynamic Routing Examples 32

1.4 Summary 32

        1.4.1.1 Activity — We Really Could Use a Map! 32

        1.4.1.2 Routing Concepts 33

Chapter 2 Static Routing 35

2.0 Introduction 35

        2.0.1.1 Static Routing 35

        2.0.1.2 Activity — Which Way Should We Go 35

2.1 Implement Static Routes 36

    2.1.1 Static Routing 36

        2.1.1.1 Reach Remote Networks 36

        2.1.1.2 Why Use Static Routing? 36

        2.1.1.3 When to Use Static Routes 37

        2.1.1.4 Activity — Identify the Advantages and Disadvantages of Static Routing 37

    2.1.2 Types of Static Routes 37

        2.1.2.1 Static Route Applications 37

        2.1.2.2 Standard Static Route 38

        2.1.2.3 Default Static Route 38

        2.1.2.4 Summary Static Route 38

        2.1.2.5 Floating Static Route 38

        2.1.2.6 Activity — Identify the Type of Static Route 39

2.2 Configure Static and Default Routes 39

    2.2.1 Configure IPv4 Static Routes 39

        2.2.1.1 ip route Command 39

        2.2.1.2 Next-Hop Options 40

        2.2.1.3 Configure a Next-Hop Static Route 40

        2.2.1.4 Configure a Directly Connected Static Route 41

        2.2.1.5 Configure a Fully Specified Static Route 41

        2.2.1.6 Verify a Static Route 42

    2.2.2 Configure IPv4 Default Routes 43

        2.2.2.1 Default Static Route 43

        2.2.2.2 Configure a Default Static Route 43

        2.2.2.3 Verify a Default Static Route 43

        2.2.2.4 Packet Tracer — Configuring IPv4 Static and Default Routes 44

        2.2.2.5 Lab — Configuring IPv4 Static and Default Routes 44

    2.2.3 Configure IPv6 Static Routes 44

        2.2.3.1 The ipv6 route Command 44

        2.2.3.2 Next-Hop Options 44

        2.2.3.3 Configure a Next-Hop Static IPv6 Route 45

        2.2.3.4 Configure a Directly Connected Static IPv6 Route 46

        2.2.3.5 Configure a Fully Specified Static IPv6 Route 46

        2.2.3.6 Verify IPv6 Static Routes 47

    2.2.4 Configure IPv6 Default Routes 47

        2.2.4.1 Default Static IPv6 Route 47

        2.2.4.2 Configure a Default Static IPv6 Route 47

        2.2.4.3 Verify a Default Static Route 48

        2.2.4.4 Packet Tracer — Configuring IPv6 Static and Default Routes 48

        2.2.4.5 Lab — Configuring IPv6 Static and Default Routes 48

    2.2.5 Configure Floating Static Routes 48

        2.2.5.1 Floating Static Routes 48

        2.2.5.2 Configure an IPv4 Floating Static Route 49

        2.2.5.3 Test the IPv4 Floating Static Route 49

        2.2.5.4 Configure an IPv6 Floating Static Route 49

        2.2.5.5 Packet Tracer — Configuring Floating Static Routes 50

    2.2.6 Configure Static Host Routes 50

        2.2.6.1 Automatically Installed Host Routes 50

        2.2.6.2 Configure IPv4 and IPv6 Static Host Routes 50

2.3 Troubleshoot Static and Default Route 51

    2.3.1 Packet Processing with Static Routes 51

        2.3.1.1 Static Routes and Packet Forwarding 51

        2.3.2 Troubleshoot IPv4 Static and Default Route Configuration 51

        2.3.2.1 Troubleshoot a Missing Route 51

        2.3.2.2 Solve a Connectivity Problem 52

        2.3.2.3 Packet Tracer — Troubleshooting Static Routes 53

        2.3.2.4 Lab — Troubleshooting Static Routes 53

2.4 Summary 53

        2.4.1.1 Activity — Make It Static 53

        2.4.1.2 Static Routing 54

Chapter 3 Dynamic Routing 57

3.0 Introduction 57

        3.0.1.1 Dynamic Routing 57

        3.0.1.2 How Much Does This Cost 57

3.1 Dynamic Routing Protocols 58

    3.1.1 Dynamic Routing Protocol Overview 58

        3.1.1.1 Dynamic Routing Protocol Evolution 58

        3.1.1.2 Dynamic Routing Protocol Components 59

    3.1.2 Dynamic versus Static Routing 59

        3.1.2.1 Static Routing Uses 59

        3.1.2.2 Static Routing Advantages and Disadvantages 60

        3.1.2.3 Dynamic Routing Protocols Uses 60

        3.1.2.4 Dynamic Routing Advantages and Disadvantages 60

        3.1.2.5 Activity — Compare Static and Dynamic Routing 60

3.2 RIPv2 61

    3.2.1 Configuring the RIP Protocol 61

        3.2.1.1 Router RIP Configuration Mode 61

        3.2.1.2 Advertise Networks 61

        3.2.1.3 Verify RIP Routing 62

        3.2.1.4 Enable and Verify RIPv2 62

        3.2.1.5 Disable Auto Summarization 63

        3.2.1.6 Configure Passive Interfaces 63

        3.2.1.7 Propagate a Default Route 64

        3.2.1.8 Packet Tracer — Configuring RIPv2 64

        3.2.1.9 Lab — Configuring Basic RIPv2 64

3.3 The Routing Table 64

    3.3.1 Parts of an IPv4 Route Entry 64

        3.3.1.1 Routing Table Entries 64

        3.3.1.2 Directly Connected Entries 65

        3.3.1.3 Remote Network Entries 66

        3.3.1.4 Activity — Identify Parts of an IPv4 Routing Table Entry 66

    3.3.2 Dynamically Learned IPv4 Routes 66

        3.3.2.1 Routing Table Terms 66

        3.3.2.2 Ultimate Route 66

        3.3.2.3 Level 1 Route 67

        3.3.2.4 Level 1 Parent Route 67

        3.3.2.5 Level 2 Child Route 67

        3.3.2.6 Activity — Identify Parent and Child IPv4 Routes 67

    3.3.3 The IPv4 Route Lookup Process 67

        3.3.3.1 Route Lookup Process 67

        3.3.3.2 Best Route = Longest Match 68

        3.3.3.3 Activity — Determine the Longest Match Route 69

    3.3.4 Analyze an IPv6 Routing Table 69

        3.3.4.1 IPv6 Routing Table Entries 69

        3.3.4.2 Directly Connected Entries 69

        3.3.4.3 Remote IPv6 Network Entries 70

        3.3.4.4 Activity — Identify Parts of an IPv6 Routing Table Entry 70

3.4 Summary 70

        3.4.1.1 IPv6 — Details, Details... 70

        3.4.1.2 Dynamic Routing 71

Chapter 4 Switched Networks 73

4.0 Introduction 73

        4.0.1.1 Switched Networks 73

        4.0.1.2 Sent or Received Instructions 73

4.1 LAN Design 74

    4.1.1 Converged Networks 74

        4.1.1.1 Growing Complexity of Networks 74

        4.1.1.2 Elements of a Converged Network 74

        4.1.1.3 Cisco Borderless Networks 75

        4.1.1.4 Hierarchy in the Borderless Switched Network 75

        4.1.1.5 Access, Distribution, and Core Layers 76

        4.1.1.6 Activity - Identify Switched Network Terminology 77

    4.1.2 Switched Networks 77

        4.1.2.1 Role of Switched Networks 77

        4.1.2.2 Form Factors 77

        4.1.2.3 Activity - Identify Switch Hardware 78

4.2 The Switched Environment 78

    4.2.1 Frame Forwarding 78

        4.2.1.1 Switching as a General Concept in Networking and Telecommunications 78

        4.2.1.2 Dynamically Populating a Switch MAC Address Table 79

        4.2.1.3 Switch Forwarding Methods 80

        4.2.1.4 Store-and-Forward Switching 80

        4.2.1.5 Cut-Through Switching 81

        4.2.1.6 Activity — Frame Forwarding Methods 81

        4.2.1.7 Activity — Switch It! 81

    4.2.2 Switching Domains 81

        4.2.2.1 Collision Domains 81

        4.2.2.2 Broadcast Domains 82

        4.2.2.3 Alleviating Network Congestion 82

        4.2.2.4 Activity — Circle the Domain 83

4.3 Summary 83

        4.3.1.1 It’s Network Access Time 83

        4.3.1.2 Basic Switch Configurations 83

        4.3.1.3 Switched Networks 83

Chapter 5 Switch Configuration 87

5.0 Introduction 87

        5.0.1.1 Switch Configuration 87

        5.0.1.2 Activity — Stand By Me 87

5.1 Basic Switch Configuration 88

    5.1.1 Configure a Switch with Initial Settings 88

        5.1.1.1 Switch Boot Sequence 88

        5.1.1.2 Recovering From a System Crash 89

        5.1.1.3 Switch LED Indicators 89

        5.1.1.4 Preparing for Basic Switch Management 90

        5.1.1.5 Configuring Basic Switch Management Access with IPv4 91

        5.1.1.6 Lab - Basic Switch Configuration 91

    5.1.2 Configure Switch Ports 92

        5.1.2.1 Duplex Communication 92

        5.1.2.2 Configure Switch Ports at the Physical Layer 92

        5.1.2.3 Auto-MDIX 93

        5.1.2.4 Verifying Switch Port Configuration 93

        5.1.2.5 Network Access Layer Issues 94

        5.1.2.6 Troubleshooting Network Access Layer Issues 95

5.2 Switch Security 96

    5.2.1 Secure Remote Access 96

        5.2.1.1 SSH Operation 96

        5.2.1.2 Configuring SSH 96

        5.2.1.3 Verifying SSH 97

        5.2.1.4 Packet Tracer - Configuring SSH 98

    5.2.2 Switch Port Security 98

        5.2.2.1 Secure Unused Ports 98

        5.2.2.2 Port Security: Operation 98

        5.2.2.3 Port Security: Violation Modes 100

        5.2.2.4 Port Security: Configuring 100

        5.2.2.5 Port Security: Verifying 100

        5.2.2.6 Ports in Error Disabled State 101

        5.2.2.7 Packet Tracer - Configuring Switch Port Security 101

        5.2.2.8 Packet Tracer - Troubleshooting Switch Port Security 101

        5.2.2.9 Lab - Configuring Switch Security Features 102

5.3 Summary 102

        5.3.1.1 Activity — Switch Trio 102

        5.3.1.2 Packet Tracer - Skills Integration Challenge 102

        5.3.1.3 Switch Configuration 102

Chapter 6 VLANs 107

6.0 Introduction 107

        6.0.1.1 VLANs 107

        6.0.1.2 Class Activity — Vacation Station 107

6.1 VLAN Segmentation 108

    6.1.1 Overview of VLANs 108

        6.1.1.1 VLAN Definitions 108

        6.1.1.2 Benefits of VLANs 108

        6.1.1.3 Types of VLANs 109

        6.1.1.4 Voice VLANs 110

        6.1.1.5 Packet Tracer — Who Hears the Broadcast? 111

    6.1.2 VLANs in a Multi-Switched Environment 111

        6.1.2.1 VLAN Trunks 111

        6.1.2.2 Controlling Broadcast Domains with VLANs 111

        6.1.2.3 Tagging Ethernet Frames for VLAN Identification 112

        6.1.2.4 Native VLANs and 802.1Q Tagging 113

        6.1.2.5 Voice VLAN Tagging 113

        6.1.2.6 Activity — Predict Switch Behavior 114

        6.1.2.7 Packet Tracer — Investigating a VLAN Implementation 114

6.2 VLAN Implementations 114

    6.2.1 VLAN Assignment 114

        6.2.1.1 VLAN Ranges on Catalyst Switches 114

        6.2.1.2 Creating a VLAN 115

        6.2.1.3 Assigning Ports to VLANs 116

        6.2.1.4 Changing VLAN Port Membership 116

        6.2.1.5 Deleting VLANs 117

        6.2.1.6 Verifying VLAN Information 117

        6.2.1.7 Packet Tracer — Configuring VLANs 117

    6.2.2 VLAN Trunks 118

        6.2.2.1 Configuring IEEE 802.1Q Trunk Links 118

        6.2.2.2 Resetting the Trunk to Default State 118

        6.2.2.3 Verifying Trunk Configuration 119

        6.2.2.4 Packet Tracer — Configuring Trunks 119

        6.2.2.5 Lab — Configuring VLANs and Trunking 119

    6.2.3 Troubleshoot VLANs and Trunks 119

        6.2.3.1 IP Addressing Issues with VLAN 119

        6.2.3.2 Missing VLANs 120

        6.2.3.3 Introduction to Troubleshooting Trunks 120

        6.2.3.4 Common Problems with Trunks 121

        6.2.3.5 Incorrect Port Mode 121

        6.2.3.6 Incorrect VLAN List 122

        6.2.3.7 Packet Tracer — Troubleshooting a VLAN Implementation — Scenario 1 122

        6.2.3.8 Packet Tracer — Troubleshooting a VLAN Implementation — Scenario 2 122

        6.2.3.9 Lab — Troubleshooting VLAN Configurations 123

6.3 Inter-VLAN Routing Using Routers 123

    6.3.1 Inter-VLAN Routing Operation 123

        6.3.1.1 What is Inter-VLAN Routing? 123

        6.3.1.2 Legacy Inter-VLAN Routing 123

        6.3.1.3 Router-on-a-Stick Inter-VLAN Routing 124

        6.3.1.4 Activity — Identify the Types of Inter-VLAN Routing 125

    6.3.2 Configure Legacy Inter-VLAN Routing 125

        6.3.2.1 Configure Legacy Inter-VLAN Routing: Preparation 125

        6.3.2.2 Configure Legacy Inter-VLAN Routing: Switch Configuration 126

        6.3.2.3 Configure Legacy Inter-VLAN Routing: Router Interface Configuration 127

        6.3.2.4 Lab — Configuring Per-Interface Inter-VLAN Routing 127

    6.3.3 Configure Router-on-a-Stick Inter-VLAN Routing 127

        6.3.3.1 Configure Router-on-a-Stick: Preparation 127

        6.3.3.2 Configure Router-on-a-Stick: Switch Configuration 128

        6.3.3.3 Configure Router-on-a-Stick: Router Subinterface Configuration 129

        6.3.3.4 Configure Router-on-a-Stick: Verifying Subinterfaces 129

        6.3.3.5 Configure Router-on-a-Stick: Verifying Routing 130

        6.3.3.6 Packet Tracer — Configuring Router-on-a-Stick Inter-VLAN Routing 131

        6.3.3.7 Lab — Configuring 801.2Q Trunk-Based Inter-VLAN Routing 131

        6.3.3.8 Packet Tracer — Inter-VLAN Routing Challenge 131

6.4 Summary 131

        6.4.1.1 The Inside Track 131

        6.4.1.2 Packet Tracer — Skills Integration Challenge 131

        6.4.1.3 VLANs 132

Chapter 7 Access Control Lists 135

7.0 Introduction 135

        7.0.1.1 Access Control Lists 135

        7.0.1.2 Permit Me to Assist You 135

7.1 ACL Operation 136

    7.1.1 Purpose of ACLs 136

        7.1.1.1 What is an ACL? 136

        7.1.1.2 Packet Filtering 136

        7.1.1.3 ACL Operation 137

        7.1.1.4 Packet Tracer — ACL Demonstration 137

    7.1.2 Wildcard Masks in ACLs 138

        7.1.2.1 Introducing ACL Wildcard Masking 138

        7.1.2.2 Wildcard Mask Examples 138

        7.1.2.3 Calculating the Wildcard Mask 139

        7.1.2.4 Wildcard Mask Keywords 140

        7.1.2.5 Wildcard Mask Keyword Examples 140

        7.1.2.6 Activity — Determine the Correct Wildcard Mask 140

        7.1.2.7 Activity — Determine the Permit or Deny 140

    7.1.3 Guidelines for ACL Creation 140

        7.1.3.1 General Guidelines for Creating ACLs 140

        7.1.3.2 ACL Best Practices 141

        7.1.3.3 Activity — ACL Operation 141

    7.1.4 Guidelines for ACL Placement 141

        7.1.4.1 Where to Place ACLs 141

        7.1.4.2 Standard ACL Placement 142

7.2 Standard IPv4 ACLs 143

    7.2.1 Configure Standard IPv4 ACLs 143

        7.2.1.1 Numbered Standard IPv4 ACL Syntax 143

        7.2.1.2 Applying Standard IPv4 ACLs to Interfaces 143

        7.2.1.3 Numbered Standard IPv4 ACL Examples 144

        7.2.1.4 Named Standard IPv4 ACL Syntax 144

        7.2.1.5 Activity — Configuring Standard IPv4 ACLs 145

        7.2.1.6 Packet Tracer — Configuring Numbered Standard IPv4 ACLs 145

        7.2.1.7 Packet Tracer — Configuring Named Standard IPv4 ACLs 145

    7.2.2 Modify IPv4 ACLs 145

        7.2.2.1 Method 1 — Use a Text Editor 145

        7.2.2.2 Method 2 — Use Sequence Numbers 146

        7.2.2.3 Editing Standard Named ACLs 147

        7.2.2.4 Verifying ACLs 147

        7.2.2.5 ACL Statistics 147

        7.2.2.6 Lab — Configuring and Modifying Standard IPv4 ACLs 148

    7.2.3 Securing VTY ports with a Standard IPv4 ACL 148

        7.2.3.1 The access-class Command 148

        7.2.3.2 Verifying the VTY Port is Secured 149

        7.2.3.3 Packet Tracer — Configuring an IPv4 ACL on VTY Lines 149

        7.2.3.4 Lab — Configuring and Verifying VTY Restrictions 149

7.3 Troubleshoot ACLs 149

    7.3.1 Processing Packets with ACLs 149

        7.3.1.1 The Implicit Deny Any 149

        7.3.1.2 The Order of ACEs in an ACL 150

        7.3.1.3 Cisco IOS Reorders Standard ACLs 150

        7.3.1.4 Routing Processes and ACLs 151

    7.3.2 Common IPv4 Standard ACL Errors 151

        7.3.2.1 Troubleshooting Standard IPv4 ACLs — Example 1 151

        7.3.2.2 Troubleshooting Standard IPv4 ACLs — Example 2 152

        7.3.2.3 Troubleshooting Standard IPv4 ACLs — Example 3 152

        7.3.2.4 Packet Tracer — Troubleshooting Standard IPv4 ACLs 152

        7.3.2.5 Lab — Troubleshooting Standard IPv4 ACL Configuration and Placement 153

7.4 Summary 153

        7.4.1.1 FTP Denied 153

        7.4.1.2 Packet Tracer — Skills Integration Challenge 153

        7.4.1.3 Access Control Lists 153

Chapter 8 DHCP 157

8.0 Introduction 157

        8.0.1.1 DHCP 157

8.1 DHCPv4 157

    8.1.1 DHCPv4 Operation 157

        8.1.1.1 Introducing DHCPv4 157

        8.1.1.2 DHCPv4 Operation 158

        8.1.1.3 DHCPv4 Message Format 159

        8.1.1.4 DHCPv4 Discover and Offer Messages 160

        8.1.1.5 Activity — Identify the Steps in DHCPv4 Operation 161

    8.1.2 Configuring a Basic DHCPv4 Server 161

        8.1.2.1 Configuring a Basic DHCPv4 Server 161

        8.1.2.2 Verifying DHCPv4 162

        8.1.2.3 DHCPv4 Relay 163

        8.1.2.4 Lab — Configuring Basic DHCPv4 on a Router 164

        8.1.2.5 Lab — Configuring Basic DHCPv4 on a Switch 164

    8.1.3 Configure DHCPv4 Client 164

        8.1.3.1 Configuring a Router as DHCPv4 Client 164

        8.1.3.2 Configuring a Wireless Router as a DHCPv4 Client 164

        8.1.3.3 Packet Tracer — Configuring DHCPv4 Using Cisco IOS 165

    8.1.4 Troubleshoot DHCPv4 165

        8.1.4.1 Troubleshooting Tasks 165

        8.1.4.2 Verify Router DHCPv4 Configuration 166

        8.1.4.3 Debugging DHCPv4 167

        8.1.4.4 Lab — Troubleshooting DHCPv4 167

8.2 DHCPv6 167

    8.2.1 SLAAC and DHCPv6 167

        8.2.1.1 Stateless Address Autoconfiguration (SLAAC) 167

        8.2.1.2 SLAAC Operation 168

        8.2.1.3 SLAAC and DHCPv6 169

        8.2.1.4 SLAAC Option 169

        8.2.1.5 Stateless DHCPv6 Option 170

        8.2.1.6 Stateful DHCPv6 Option 170

        8.2.1.7 DHCPv6 Operations 171

        8.2.1.8 Activity — Identify the Steps in DHCPv6 Operation 171

    8.2.2 Stateless DHCPv6 172

        8.2.2.1 Configuring a Router as a Stateless DHCPv6 Server 172

        8.2.2.2 Configuring a Router as a Stateless DHCPv6 Client 172

        8.2.2.3 Verifying Stateless DHCPv6 173

    8.2.3 Stateful DHCPv6 Server 173

        8.2.3.1 Configuring a Router as a Stateful DHCPv6 Server 173

        8.2.3.2 Configuring a Router as a Stateful DHCPv6 Client 174

        8.2.3.3 Verifying Stateful DHCPv6 174

        8.2.3.4 Configuring a Router as a DHCPv6 Relay Agent 175

        8.2.3.5 Lab — Configuring Stateless and Stateful DHCPv6 175

    8.2.4 Troubleshoot DHCPv6 176

        8.2.4.1 Troubleshooting Tasks 176

        8.2.4.2 Verify Router DHCPv6 Configuration 177

        8.2.4.3 Debugging DHCPv6 177

        8.2.4.4 Lab — Troubleshooting DHCPv6 177

8.3 Summary 178

        8.3.1.1 Class Activity — IoE and DHCP 178

        8.3.1.2 Packet Tracer — Skills Integration Challenge 178

        8.3.1.3 DHCP 178

Chapter 9 NAT for IPv4 181

9.0 Introduction 181

        9.0.1.1 NAT for IPv4 181

        9.0.1.2 Conceptual NAT 181

9.1 NAT Operation 182

    9.1.1 NAT Characteristics 182

        9.1.1.1 IPv4 Private Address Space 182

        9.1.1.2 What is NAT? 182

        9.1.1.3 NAT Terminology 183

        9.1.1.4 NAT Terminology (Cont.) 184

        9.1.1.5 How NAT Works 184

        9.1.1.6 Activity — Identify the NAT Terminology 185

    9.1.2 Types of NAT 185

        9.1.2.1 Static NAT 185

        9.1.2.2 Dynamic NAT 186

        9.1.2.3 Port Address Translation (PAT) 186

        9.1.2.4 Next Available Port 187

        9.1.2.5 Comparing NAT and PAT 187

        9.1.2.6 Packet Tracer - Investigating NAT Operation 188

    9.1.3 NAT Advantages 188

        9.1.3.1 Advantages of NAT 188

        9.1.3.2 Disadvantages of NAT 188

9.2 Configure NAT 189

    9.2.1 Configuring Static NAT 189

        9.2.1.1 Configure Static NAT 189

        9.2.1.2 Analyzing Static NAT 190

        9.2.1.3 Verifying Static NAT 190

        9.2.1.4 Packet Tracer — Configuring Static NAT 191

    9.2.2 Configure Dynamic NAT 191

        9.2.2.1 Dynamic NAT Operation 191

        9.2.2.2 Configuring Dynamic NAT 191

        9.2.2.3 Analyzing Dynamic NAT 192

        9.2.2.4 Verifying Dynamic NAT 193

        9.2.2.5 Packet Tracer — Configuring Dynamic NAT 194

        9.2.2.6 Lab — Configuring Dynamic and Static NAT 194

    9.2.3 Configure PAT 194

        9.2.3.1 Configuring PAT: Address Pool 194

        9.2.3.2 Configuring PAT: Single Address 195

        9.2.3.3 Analyzing PAT 195

        9.2.3.4 Verifying PAT 196

        9.2.3.5 Activity — Identify the Address Information at Each Hop 197

        9.2.3.6 Packet Tracer — Implementing Static and Dynamic NAT 197

        9.2.3.7 Lab — Configuring Port Address Translation (PAT) 197

    9.2.4 Configure Port Forwarding 197

        9.2.4.1 Port Forwarding 197

        9.2.4.2 Wireless Router Example 198

        9.2.4.3 Configuring Port Forwarding with IOS 198

        9.2.4.4 Packet Tracer — Configuring Port Forwarding on a Wireless Router 199

    9.2.5 NAT and IPv6 199

        9.2.5.1 NAT for IPv6? 199

        9.2.5.2 IPv6 Unique Local Addresses 200

        9.2.5.3 NAT for IPv6 201

9.3 Troubleshoot NAT 201

    9.3.1 NAT Troubleshooting Commands 201

        9.3.1.1 The show ip nat Commands 201

        9.3.1.2 The debug ip nat Command 202

        9.3.1.3 NAT Troubleshooting Scenario 202

        9.3.1.4 Packet Tracer - Verifying and Troubleshooting NAT Configurations 203

        9.3.1.5 Lab — Troubleshooting NAT Configurations 203

9.4 Summary 203

        9.4.1.1 NAT Check 203

        9.4.1.2 Packet Tracer — Skills Integration Challenge 204

        9.4.1.3 NAT for IPv4 204

Chapter 10 Device Discovery, Management, and Maintenance 207

10.0 Introduction 207

        10.0.1.1 Device Discovery, Management, and Maintenance 207

10.1 Device Discovery 207

    10.1.1 Device Discovery with CDP 207

        10.1.1.1 CDP Overview 207

        10.1.1.2 Configure and Verify CDP 208

        10.1.1.3 Discover Devices Using CDP 208

        10.1.1.4 Packet Tracer — Map a Network Using CDP 209

    10.1.2 Device Discovery with LLDP 209

        10.1.2.1 LLDP Overview 209

        10.1.2.2 Configure and Verify LLDP 209

        10.1.2.3 Discover Devices Using LLDP 209

        10.1.2.4 Activity — Compare CDP and LLDP 210

        10.1.2.5 Lab — Configure CDP and LLDP 210

10.2 Device Management 210

    10.2.1 NTP 210

        10.2.1.1 Setting the System Clock 210

        10.2.1.2 NTP Operation 211

        10.2.1.3 Configure and Verify NTP 211

        10.2.1.4 Packet Tracer — Configure and Verify NTP 212

    10.2.2 Syslog Operation 212

        10.2.2.1 Introduction to Syslog 212

        10.2.2.2 Syslog Operation 212

        10.2.2.3 Syslog Message Format 213

        10.2.2.4 Service Timestamp 214

        10.2.2.5 Activity — Interpret Syslog Output 214

    10.2.3 Syslog Configuration 214

        10.2.3.1 Syslog Server 214

        10.2.3.2 Default Logging 215

        10.2.3.3 Router and Switch Commands for Syslog Clients 215

        10.2.3.4 Verifying Syslog 216

        10.2.3.5 Packet Tracer — Configuring Syslog and NTP 216

        10.2.3.6 Lab — Configuring Syslog and NTP 216

10.3 Device Maintenance 216

    10.3.1 Router and Switch File Maintenance 216

        10.3.1.1 Router File Systems 216

        10.3.1.2 Switch File Systems 217

        10.3.1.3 Backing Up and Restoring Using Text Files 217

        10.3.1.4 Backing up and Restoring TFTP 218

        10.3.1.5 Using USB Ports on a Cisco Router 219

        10.3.1.6 Backing Up and Restoring Using a USB 219

        10.3.1.7 Password Recovery 219

        10.3.1.8 Packet Tracer — Backing Up Configuration Files 220

        10.3.1.9 Lab — Managing Router Configuration Files with Tera Term 221

        10.3.1.10 Lab — Managing Device Configuration Files Using TFTP, Flash, and USB 221

        10.3.1.11 Lab — Researching Password Recovery Procedures 221

    10.3.2 IOS System Files 221

        10.3.2.1 IOS 15 System Image Packaging 221

        10.3.2.2 IOS Image Filenames 222

    10.3.3 IOS Image Management 223

        10.3.3.1 TFTP Servers as a Backup Location 223

        10.3.3.2 Steps to Backup IOS Image to TFTP Server 223

        10.3.3.3 Steps to Copy an IOS Image to a Device 224

        10.3.3.4 The boot system Command 225

        10.3.3.5 Packet Tracer — Using a TFTP Server to Upgrade a Cisco IOS Image 225

        10.3.3.6 Video Demonstration — Managing Cisco IOS Images 225

    10.3.4 Software Licensing 225

        10.3.4.1 Licensing Overview 225

        10.3.4.2 Licensing Process 226

        10.3.4.3 Step 1. Purchase the Software Package or Feature to Install 226

        10.3.4.4 Step 2. Obtain a License 227

        10.3.4.5 Step 3. Install the License 227

    10.3.5 License Verification and Management 228

        10.3.5.1 License Verification 228

        10.3.5.2 Activate an Evaluation Right-To-Use License 228

        10.3.5.3 Back up the License 229

        10.3.5.4 Uninstall the License 230

        10.3.5.5 Video Demonstration — Working with IOS 15 Image Licenses 230

10.4 Summary 230

        10.4.1.1 Packet Tracer — Skills Integration Challenge 230

        10.4.1.2 Device Discovery, Management, and Maintenance 230

9781587134272    TOC    9/30/2016

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