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CMMI(SM) Distilled: A Practical Introduction to Integrated Process Improvement

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CMMI(SM) Distilled: A Practical Introduction to Integrated Process Improvement

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Description

  • Copyright 2001
  • Dimensions: 7-3/8x9-1/4
  • Pages: 336
  • Edition: 1st
  • Book
  • ISBN-10: 0-201-73500-8
  • ISBN-13: 978-0-201-73500-0

The original Capability Maturity Model® (CMM®) framework has been widely adopted to support software process improvement. Its success has led to the development of similar models for process improvement in other areas: systems engineering, acquisition, and human resources, among others. However, the existence of multiple process improvement models within the same organization can lead to conflict and confusion. The Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) project, spearheaded by industry, government, and the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) at Carnegie Mellon, aims to alleviate these difficulties. It supplies a single, integrated framework for improving various processes throughout an organization, thereby enhancing the quality and efficiency of the organization as a whole.

CMMI® Distilled offers executives, project managers, systems and software engineers, and process improvement practitioners a concise, authoritative, and experience-rich introduction to the CMMI framework. The book first explains key aspects of integrated process improvement. Brief case studies highlight the experiences of organizations that have pioneered integrated process improvement and reveal potential pitfalls as well as best practices. It then describes the structure and content of CMMI tools and offers concrete, practical implementation guidelines.

Specific topics covered include:

  • The benefits of integrated process improvement
  • Migration from legacy process improvement activities to the CMMI framework
  • The initial CMMI disciplines: systems engineering, software engineering, and integrated product and process development
  • The proposed CMMI extension for acquisition
  • Staged and continuous CMMI model representations
  • Choosing the most appropriate models for your organization
  • Customizing CMMI products for a specific organization
  • The rationale behind certain CMMI design decisions
  • The initial approach to assessments in CMMI
  • Likely future developments within the CMMI project

The CMMI models are large and complex products. CMMI® Distilled provides a concise introduction to help you understand the CMMI framework, evaluate it, and take the first steps toward integrated process improvement.



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Table of Contents



Figure List.


Preface.

I. INTEGRATED PROCESS IMPROVEMENT.

1. Why Integrated Process Improvement?

The Engineering Environment of the Twenty-First Century.

Concurrent Engineering and the Cross-Discipline Team.

A Proliferation of Models and Standards.

The Benefits of Integrated Process Improvement.

Conclusions.

2. Implementing Integrated Process Improvement.

Starting Integrated Process Improvement.

Building an Integrated Improvement Infrastructure.

Integrating Legacy Processes and Initiatives.

Using Assessments.

Integrated Process Improvement Examples.

II. The CMMI Models.

3. The CMMI Concept.

CMMI Project Organization.

CMMI Objectives.

The Three Source Models.

Process Areas.

An Extensible Framework.

4. CMMI Content.

Content Classification.

Required Materials.

Expected Materials.

Informative Materials.

Document Map.

5. CMMI Representations.

Staged Models.

Continuous Models.

CMMI Model Representations.

6. CMMI Dimensions for Measuring Improvement.

Capability Dimension.

Maturity Dimension.

Generic Practices in the Capability Dimension.

Generic Practices in the Maturity Dimension.

Organizational Capability Evolution.

7. CMMI Process Areas.

Process Management Process Areas.

Project Management Process Areas.

Engineering Process Areas.

Support Process Areas.

Integrated Product and Process Development Process Areas.

Acquisition Process Areas.

Relationships with CMMI Components.

III. Using CMMI.

8. Selecting the Appropriate Disciplines.

The Discipline Dilemma.

Your Situation.

The IPPD Extension.

The Acquisition Extension.

Selecting the Appropriate Model.

9. Picking a Representation.

Reasons for Liking Staged Models.

Reasons for Liking Continuous Models.

Reasons for Choosing a CMMI Representation.

10. Assessments with CMMI.

Assessment Requirements for CMMI.

Standard CMMI Assessment Method for Process Improvement.

Using Assessments in Process Improvement.

Making a CMMI Model Your Own (Tailoring).

IV. The Future of CMMI.

11. Evolving CMMI.

Single Versus Dual Representations.

Collection of Issues for Version 1.1 and Beyond.

Afterword.
The Charge of the CMMI Product Team.
Appendix A. Summary of CMMI-SE/SW/IPPD Models: Summary of Continuous Representation.
Appendix B. Summary of CMMISE/SW/IPPD Models: Summary of Staged Representation .
Appendix C. References.
Appendix D. Resources.
Index. 0201735008T04062001

Preface

This book is about a new way of approaching process improvement for engineering development. Process improvement is a generally well-understood and accepted means of achieving quality and productivity gains for software development, and the recognition of its importance for other engineering disciplines is growing. The success and wide adoption of the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for Software have inspired increased development of similar models in disciplines other than software. The resulting proliferation of models in engineering organizations has led to conflicts in process improvement goals and techniques, considerable increases in required training, and confusion on the part of practitioners as to which of the various models applies to their specific needs.
    The Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) project, an ongoing effort by industry, the U.S. government, and the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) of Carnegie Mellon University, is attempting to address this situation. Started in 1998, CMMI is an effort to codify the tenets of model-based process improvement and provide a single, integrated framework for improving engineering processes in organizations that span several disciplines. By integrating the tools and techniques used to improve individual engineering disciplines, both the quality and the efficiency of organizational process improvement are enhanced.
    In the last quarter of 2000, after extensive stakeholder review and piloting, the first official CMMI products were released. These models provide users with a choice of single or integrated disciplines and a choice of a staged or continuous representation. They include a wealth of engineering and process improvement information, such as clear goals and extensive guidance on the best practices to achieve them. Most importantly, a well-defined framework outlines how additional disciplines may be brought into the product suite so as to minimize the development of incompatible models in the future.

Purpose of the Book

This book has a threefold purpose. First, we intend to help organizations understand how an integrated approach to process improvement can help mature their technical and management processes. Second, to support this integrated approach, we present a new set of tools developed by the CMMI project specifically designed for multidiscipline process improvement. Finally, we provide practical guidance in the selection and use of those tools. This guidance is based on lessons learned from organizations that have adopted integrated process improvement, as well as the knowledge and experience gained from the hundreds of professionals who were involved in the development of the CMMI product suite.

Audience for the Book

The intended audience for this book comprises executives, middle managers, team leaders, acquisition specialists, process improvement champions, and the often overlooked and overworked process improvement practitioners. Executives, who may have deferred process improvement in the past because the scope of their business exceeded the boundaries of a single model, will find an approach and tools to mitigate their concerns. Middle managers and team leaders will find information on the effects of process improvement on their responsibilities and the cross-discipline nature of their environments. Process improvement champions will find a means to enlarge their base of support and focus their efforts in a way that heightens the chances of adoption and success. Finally, individuals who are charged with implementing the process improvement will find help in applying models in the real world. It is our hope that when unsuspecting project and program managers are instructed to "implement that CMMI stuff," this book will provide sufficient information to save both their careers and their sanity.
    While applicable to any organization involved with rigorous, time-critical development of complex systems, this book will hold special interest for system developers and systems integrators who supply the U.S. government. The federal government participated in the CMMI development work, thereby supporting the efforts of its suppliers (both external and internal) to improve process performance. In October 1999, the U.S. Department of Defense established the requirement that its large program development contractors demonstrate full compliance with a maturity level 3 as measured by the Software CMM (or equivalent).2 More recently, it has indicated its intention to have CMMI-SE/SW identified as an equivalent evaluation tool.3 Given the considerable interest at all levels in adding the acquisition discipline to CMMI, the authors believe that CMMI will likely see application in improving government system acquisition organizations as well.

Organization of the Book

The book is divided into four major parts.
    Part I introduces integrated process improvement and provides a rationale for undertaking such an approach. This material is both a primer for the novice and ammunition to gain management support for the process improvement champion. It offers general guidance as well as specific hints on implementation, including pointers to support the migration from legacy process improvement activities and accomplishments. Part I also provides case studies and lessons learned from the pioneering organizations that blazed the trail toward integrated process improvement. If you wish to start your reading with the details of CMMI, you could save this first part for review at a later time.
    Part II describes the work of the CMMI project. The philosophy, architecture, and models of CMMI products are presented, and examples of the models are annotated in detail to provide a better understanding of their contents. This part also includes much of the rationale for specific CMMI decisions and help in navigating the rather daunting CMMI models.
    Part III builds on the first two parts and offers the authors practical guidance in the use of the CMMI products. It suggests heuristics for choosing models and representations appropriate for a specific organization. It also describes CMMI assessments and explains how to tailor the CMMI products to fit an organization and enhance the probability of success in applying CMMI.
    Part IV presents some musings on the future of CMMI. These informed speculations reflect some of the discussions held formally and informally during CMMI development. The ideas included are intended to invite discussion and spark innovation, but not, as the sportswriters say, "as the basis for any actual cash wager."
    Like their predecessors, the CMMI models are by necessity large and complex products. This book, while not duplicating all their information, will help you understand the CMMI models and auxiliary materials. It provides a rationale for integrating process improvement, a guide to the structure and contents of the CMMI models, and some practical ideas for using the models effectively in your organization. We strongly encourage you to obtain copies of the models from the CMMI Web site (www.sei.cmu.edu/cmmi) and browse through them as you are reading this book, especially Parts II and III. For readers who would like a flavor of the models, Appendixes A and B presents a concise summary of CMMI/SW/SE/IPPD content in both the continuous and staged representations.
    The CMMI project is an ongoing effort, so any project as time-restricted as a book will necessarily be overcome by events. The authors have strived to provide information that is both timely and of lasting value, but understand the reality of the CMMI environment. To that end, the publisher has agreed to suppor

Index

A

Ability to perform

Causal Analysis and Resolution process area and, 273

Configuration Management process area and, 241@nd242

Decision Analysis and Resolution process area and, 263@nd264

generic practices and, 111

Integrated Teaming process area and, 252

IPPD process area and, 258

maturity levels and, relationship of, 102

Measurement and Analysis process area and, 238

Organizational Environment for Integration process area and, 265

Organizational Innovation and Deployment process area and, 271

Organizational Process Focus process area and, 253

Organizational Process Performance process area and, 267

Process and Product Quality Assurance process area and, 240

Product Integration process area and, 247@nd248

Project Monitoring and Control process area and, 235

Project Planning process area and, 233@nd234

Quantitative Project Management process area and, 269

Requirements Development process area and, 243

Requirements Management process area and, 232

Risk Management process area and, 260

Supplier Agreement Management process area and, 237

Technical Solution process area and, 245

Validation process area and, 251

Verification process area and, 249

Acquisition extension, 167@nd169

Acquisition process areas

Integrated Supplier Management process area, 154@nd155

Monitoring process area, 153@nd154

Quantitative Supplier Management process area, 155

Supplier Selection process area, 153@nd154

Action proposals, 227

Adoption schedules, 26

After the Appraisal: A Systematic Survey of Process Improvement, Its Benefits, and Factors That Influence Success (Goldenson and Herbsleb), 277

Angelou, Maya, 179

ARC (Assessments Requirements for CMMI), 180@nd183

ASG (Advanced Systems Group), 39@nd42

Assessment(s)

basic description of, 179@nd189

checklist mentality and, 27@nd28

Class A, 185@nd186

Class B, 185@nd186

Class C, 185@nd186

continuous, 32@nd34, 84

data collection, 181

documentation, 180@nd181

method, standard, 183@nd184

planning and preparing for, 181

requirements, 180@nd183

SCAMPI, 183@nd186, 187@nd188

staged models and, 81@nd82

timeline, 186

using, 27@nd28, 185@nd186

Assessments Requirements for CMMI, version 1.0 (ARC), 180@nd183

Assign Responsibility generic practice (GP 2.4), 104, 105, 111

AT&T Labs, 50

B

BAE, 50

Bartlett, John, 65

Baselines, configuration, 224@nd225

Bate, Roger, 58

Berlin Wall, 8

Berra, Yogi, 114

Best practices, leveraging, 23@nd24

"Big bang" events, 28

Boehm, Barry, 199

Boeing, 50

Books in My Life, The (Miller), 49

Bothwell, C., 277

Britcher, Robert, 6, 275

British Standards Institution, 13

"Build-a-little, test-a-little" approach, 33

Buonarotti, Michaelangelo, 190

C

CAM (Continuous Appraisal Method)

basic description of, 33@nd34

phase III schedule, 34

Capability dimension. See also Capability levels

basic description of, 96@nd101

level 0 generic practices, 103

level 1 generic practices, 103@nd104

level 2 generic practices, 104@nd107

level 3 generic practices, 107@nd108

level 4 generic practices, 108@nd109

Capability evolution, organizational, 112@nd113

Capability level(s). See also Capability levels (listed by name)

basic description of, 96@nd97

maturity levels and, relationship of, 101@nd103

profiles, 84@nd85, 92@nd93, 175

use of the term, 80

Capability levels (listed by name). See also Capability levels

CL 0 (Not Performed capability level), 97@nd98, 102, 103

CL 1 (Performed capability level), 97@nd98, 103@nd104, 112, 118

CL 2 (Managed capability level), 98@nd99, 100, 101, 104@nd107, 109

CL 3 (Defined capability level), 98, 99@nd100, 102, 107@nd108

CL 4 (Quantitatively Managed capability level), 100, 102, 108@nd109

CL 5 (Optimizing capability level), 100@nd101, 102, 113

Carnegie Mellon University. See SEI (Software Engineering Institute)

Causal Analysis and Resolution process area, 147@nd148, 227

ability to perform and, 273

commitment to perform and, 273

context diagram, 148

directing implementation and, 273@nd274

generic practices and, 110

goals for, 67

Maturity level 5 and, 272@nd274

verifying implementation and, 274

CBA IPI (CMM-Based Appraisal for Internal Process Improvement), 33, 57, 180, 276

Cheasapeake Bay, 46, 47

Checklist mentality, preventing the emergence of, 27@nd28

Clarity, increasing, 53

Clark, William, 161

CMM Appraisal Framework, 57, 277

CMM Appraisal Framework (Bothwell and Masters), 277

CMM-Based Appraisal for Internal Process Improvement (CBA IPI), 33, 57, 180, 276

CMM-Based Appraisal for Internal Process Improvement (Dunaway and Masters), 276

CMM for Software, 29, 55@nd57

basic description of, 9

Litton PRC and, 32

organizational capability evolution and, 112@nd113

THALES and, 43@nd45

CMMI (Capability Maturity Model Integration) project. See also specific models

basic description of, ix@ndx

components, 155@nd159

concept, diagram of, 53

content, 65@nd77

development of, 49@nd50

dimensions, for measuring improvement, 95@nd113

future of, 191@nd206

Glossary, 68, 73

milestones, 54

objectives, 52@nd55

Product Development Team, 50@nd54, 62, 80, 85@nd86, 164, 177, 202

project organization, 50@nd52

representations, 79@nd94, 171@nd178

Unified (U-CMMI), 199@nd200

version 1.1, issues for, 202@nd205

CMMI-SE/SW/IPPD model

Acquisition extension, 167@nd169

expected materials and, 69, 71

goals for, 67

objectives of, 52

process areas, 88@nd90, 115@nd160

release of, 54

summary of, 211@nd274

three source models for, 55@nd60

CMMI-SE/SW model, 40, 42

expected materials and, 69, 71

goals for, 67

Litton PRC and, 28

objectives of, 52

process areas, 60@nd63

Collect Improvement Information generic practice (GP 3.2), 108, 111, 158

Commitment to perform

Causal Analysis and Resolution process area and, 273

Configuration Management process area and, 241

Decision Analysis and Resolution process area and, 263

generic practices and, 111

Integrated Teaming process area and, 252

IPPD process area and, 258@nd259

maturity levels and, relationship of, 102

Measurement and Analysis process area and, 238

Organizational Environment for Integration process area and, 265

Organizational Innovation and Deployment process area and, 271

Organizational Training process area and, 256

Organizational Process Focus process area and, 252

Organizational Process Performance process area and, 267

Process and Product Quality Assurance process area and, 240

Product Integration process area and, 247

Project Monitoring and Control process area and, 235

Project Planning process area and, 233

Quantitative Project Management process area and, 269

Requirements Development process area and, 243

Requirements Management process area and, 232

Risk Management process area and, 260

Supplier Agreement Management process area and, 237

Technical Solution process area and, 245

Validation process area and, 251

Verification process area and, 249

Common Feature category, for generic practices, 103

Common sense, 158@nd159

Communications of the ACM, 276

Complexity

Britcher on, 6

CMMI components and, 158@nd159

of the engineering environment, 3@nd4

of relationships among elements of the CMMI models, 158@nd159

Component(s)

complexity of, 158@nd159

interfaces, 223

relationships with, 155@nd159

Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), 50

Concurrent engineering, 4

Configuration Management process area process area, 144@nd145, 224@nd225

ability to perform and, 241@nd242

commitment to perform and, 241

context diagram, 145

directing implementation and, 242

specific goals and practices for, 71@nd72

verifying implementation and, 242

Consistent style, providing, 53

Construction rules, establishing uniform, 53

Content

classification, 66

CMMI, 65@nd77

Context diagram(s)

Organizational Environment for Integration, 152

Organizational Innovation and Deployment, 122

Organizational Process Focus, 120

Organizational Process Performance, 121

Organizational Training, 123

Process and Quality Assurance, 146

Product Integration, 140

Project Planning, 126

Quantitative Project Management, 129@nd130

Requirements Development, 136

Requirements Management, 135

Risk Management, 132

Supplier Agreement Management, 131

Technical Solution, 139

Validation, 143

Verification, 141

Continuous assessment method, 32@nd34

Continuous models

attractiveness of, 174@nd176

basic description of, 83@nd85

capability dimension and, 96@nd101

process areas and, 89@nd90, 115@nd117, 211@nd230

staged models and, comparison of, 175@nd176

tailoring, 186@nd189

summary of, 211@nd242

Cooper, Jack, 276

Correct Common Cause of Problems generic practice (GP 5.2), 110, 158

COTS (commercial-off-the-shelf) products, 23, 217

Creativity, 23

Croesus of Lydia (king), 191

Crosby, Phillip, 4, 174, 275

Cross-discipline teams, 4, 7@nd8

CSC (Computer Sciences Corporation), 50

Curtis, Bill, 276

D

Database architecture, 63@nd64

Decision Analysis and Resolution process area, 148@nd149, 226@nd227

ability to perform and, 263@nd264

commitment to perform and, 263

context diagram, 149

directing implementation and, 264

Maturity level 3 and, 263@nd264

verifying implementation and, 264

Defects, causes of, identifying, 227

Defense Systems Software Development Standard, 13

Defined capability level (CL 3), 98, 99@nd100, 102, 107@nd108

Defined processes, institutionalization as, 228

Delphic Sybil (Buonarotti), 190

Deming, W. Edwards, 3, 4, 208, 276

Department of Defense, xi, 166, 276

development of the CMMI by, 49

Software Acquisition CMM developed by, 9

statistics, on the need for software code, 6

support for IPPD, 59

Deputy Under Secretary of Defense, 49

Diagrams, context

Organizational Environment for Integration, 152

Organizational Innovation and Deployment, 122

Organizational Process Focus, 120

Organizational Process Performance, 121

Organizational Training, 123

Process and Quality Assurance, 146

Product Integration, 140

Project Planning, 126

Quantitative Project Management, 129@nd130

Requirements Development, 136

Requirements Management, 135

Risk Management, 132

Supplier Agreement Management, 131

Technical Solution, 139

Validation, 143

Verification, 141

Diaries of Anaïs Nin, The (Nin), 199

Directing implementation

Causal Analysis and Resolution process area and, 273

Configuration Management process area and, 242

Decision Analysis and Resolution process area and, 264

generic practices and, 111

maturity levels and, relationship of, 102

Integrated Teaming process area and, 252@nd253

IPPD process area and, 259

Measurement and Analysis process area and, 239

Organizational Environment for Integration process area and, 266

Organizational Innovation and Deployment process area and, 272

Organizational Process Focus process area and, 253

Organizational Process Performance process area and, 268

Organizational Training process area and, 256@nd257

Process and Product Quality Assurance process area and, 240

Product Integration process area and, 248

Project Planning process area and, 234

Project Monitoring and Control process area and, 235@nd236

Quantitative Project Management process area and, 270

Requirements Development process area and, 244

Requirements Management process area and, 232

Risk Management process area and, 260@nd261

Supplier Agreement Management process area and, 237

Technical Solution process area and, 246

Validation process area and, 251

Verification process area and, 249@nd250

Discipline(s)

Acquisition extension and, 167@nd169

as closely intertwined, 4

"dilemma," 164

extension into new, 16

IPPD extension and, 166@nd167

lean organizations and, 16

your business environment and, 165@nd166

your core business and, 164@nd165

your objectives and, 166

your organization and, 165

your process improvement scope and, 166

your situation and, 164@nd166

Documentation

assessment, 180@nd181

end-use, 222

FAA, 276

Document maps, 75@nd77

Defense Department, xi, 166, 276

development of the CMMI by, 49

Software Acquisition CMM developed by, 9

statistics, on the need for software code, 6

support for IPPD, 59

Doré, Gustave, xiv

Dunaway, D., 276

E

EER Systems, 50

EIA (Electronic Industries Alliance), 276, 279@nd280. See also EIA/IS 731 model; EIA/IS 732 model

EIA Interim Standard, Systems Engineering Capability, 276

EIA/IS 731 model, 10, 31, 57, 59, 83@nd84, 179, 201

generic attributes and, 203

goals for, 67

process areas and, 61, 62, 117

Eisner, Howard, 58, 276

"Elevator speeches," 21

Eliot, George, 163

Engineering. See also Engineering process areas

concurrent, cross-discipline teams and, 7@nd8

definition of, 56@nd57

environment of the twenty-first century, 5@nd7

terminology, IEEE Glossary of, 277

Engineering Management Council, 42

Engineering process areas, 132@nd143, 220@nd224

Product Integration process area, 74@nd75, 140@nd141, 222@nd223, 247@nd248

Requirements Development process area, 86, 136@nd138, 221, 243@nd244

Requirements Management process area, 61, 67, 86@nd87, 134@nd136, 220, 231@nd232

Technical Solution process area, 138@nd140, 221@nd222,

245@nd246

Validation process area, 142@nd143, 224, 250@nd252

Verification process area, 141@nd142, 223@nd224, 248@nd250

Engineering Process Group (EPG), 24@nd25, 31

Engineering Performance Improvement Group (EPIG), 40@nd42

Engineering Process Organization, 35@nd36

Ensure Continuous Process Improvement generic practice (GP 5.1), 110

Enterprise

processes, integrated, 35@nd37

viewpoints, 203

EPG (Engineering Process Group), 24@nd25,31

EPIC (Enterprise Process Improvement Collaboration), 10, 40@nd42, 58

development of IPD CMM by, 60

and the GEIA, 59

and IPPD concepts, 60

EPIG (Engineering Performance Improvement Group), 40@nd42

Equivalent staging, 91@nd94

Ericsson Canada, 50

Ernst and Young, 50

ESI International, 11

ESPI (European Software Process Improvement Foundation), 280

Essentials of Project and Systems Engineering Management (Eisner), 58, 276

ESSS (Northrop Grumman Electronic Sensors and Systems Sector), 35@nd37

Establish a Defined Process generic practice (GP 3.1), 108, 158

Establish an Organizational Policy generic practice (GP 2.1), 104, 111

Establish Quality Objectives generic practice (GP 4.1), 109, 158

European monarchies, 11@nd12

European Software Process Improvement Foundation (ESPI), 280

European Quality Award, 13

Evolution, organizational capability, 112@nd113

Executive(s)

"overview" level, 66

getting commitment from, 21@nd22

support, maintaining, 21@nd22

Extensible frameworks, 63@nd64

F

FAA (Federal Aviation Administration)

CMMI Product Development team and, 50

documentation, 276

iCMM, 10, 29@nd30

overview of, 280

problem faced by, 29

solution proposed for, 29@nd30

Falat, Michael, 276

Fellowship of the Ring (Tolkien), 65

Ferguson, Jack, 276

Fisher, Matthew, 276

Focus, clarity of, 14, 15@nd16

Functionality, definition of, 221

G

Garcia, Suzanne, 23

GEIA (Government Electronic and Information Technology Association), 59

General Dynamics, 50

Generic. See also Generic practices

attributes, 203

goals, 66@nd68, 227@nd229

Generic practices, 69@nd71, 74@nd75, 227@nd229. See also Generic practices

(listed by name)

capability dimension and, 96@nd101

Capability level 1, 103@nd104

Capability level 2, 104@nd107

Capability level 3, 107@nd108

Capability level 4, 108@nd109

Capability level 5, 109@nd110

common features and, 111@nd112

maturity dimension and, 110@nd112

selecting representations and, 177

Generic practices (listed by name). See also Generic practices

GP 2.7 (Identify and Involve Relevant Stakeholders), 104, 105@nd106, 111, 158

GP 1.1 (Identify Work Scope), 103

GP 1.2 (Perform Base Practices), 103, 104

GP 2.1 (Establish an Organizational Policy), 104, 111

GP 2.2 (Plan the Process), 104

GP 2.3 (Provide Resources), 104, 105, 111

GP 2.4 (Assign Responsibility), 104, 105, 111

GP 2.5 (Train People), 104, 105, 111

GP 2.6 (Manage Configurations), 104, 105, 111, 158

GP 2.8 (Monitor and Control the Process), 104, 107, 111, 158

GP 2.9 (Objectively Evaluate Adherence), 104, 107, 158

GP 2.10 (Review Status with Higher-Level Management), 104, 107

GP 3.1 (Establish a Defined Process), 108, 111, 158

GP 3.2 (Collect Improvement Information), 108, 111, 158

GP 4.1 (Establish Quality Objectives), 109, 158

GP 4.2 (Stabilize Subprocess Performance), 109

GP 5.1 (Ensure Continuous Process Improvement), 110

GP 5.2 (Correct Common Cause of Problems), 110, 158

Gibran, Kahlil, 171

Glossary (CMMI), 68, 73

Goal(s)

aligning process areas with, 24

capability levels and, 96@nd101

CMMI representation and, 92

efficiency, 24

generic, 66@nd68, 227@nd229

informative materials and, 72@nd73

maturity levels and, 93, 101@nd103

required materials and, 66@nd67

selecting, 22@nd23, 177

specific, 66@nd70

staged models and, 81

statements, 68

Goddard Space Flight Center, 46

Goldenson, Dennis, 276, 277

GP 1.1 (Identify Work Scope), 103

GP 1.2 (Perform Base Practices), 103, 104

GP 2.1 (Establish an Organizational Policy), 104, 111

GP 2.2 (Plan the Process), 104

GP 2.3 (Provide Resources), 104, 105, 111

GP 2.4 (Assign Responsibility), 104, 105, 111

GP 2.5 (Train People), 104, 105, 111

GP 2.6 (Manage Configurations), 104, 105, 111, 158

GP 2.7 (Identify and Involve Relevant Stakeholders), 104, 105@nd106, 111, 158

GP 2.8 (Monitor and Control the Process), 104, 107, 111, 158

GP 2.9 (Objectively Evaluate Adherence), 104, 107, 158

GP 2.10 (Review Status with Higher-Level Management), 104, 107

GP 3.1 (Establish a Defined Process), 108, 111, 158

GP 3.2 (Collect Improvement Information), 108, 111, 158

GP 4.1 (Establish Quality Objectives), 109, 158

GP 4.2 (Stabilize Subprocess Performance), 109

GP 5.1 (Ensure Continuous Process Improvement), 110

GP 5.2 (Correct Common Cause of Problems), 110, 158

Grail Knight, 171

Grumman, 50

Guideo, Anthony, 276

H

Harding, J. T., 278

Harris Corporation, 50

Hayes, W., 276, 277

Hefley, William E., 276

Henry, Patrick, 19

Herbsleb, James, 276, 277

Herodotus, 191

Hirmanpour, I., 277

Home organization, use of the term, 151

Honeywell, 50

Humphrey, Watts, 56, 277

Huxley, Thomas Henry, 199

Hybrid solutions, 79, 80, 86, 88

I

IBM (International Business Machines), 56

IBM Systems Journal, 278

Ibrahim, Linda, 277

Ibrahim, Rosalind, 277

I-CM (Integrated Capability Model), 36

Identify and Involve Relevant Stakeholders generic practice (GP 2.7), 104, 105@nd106, 111, 158

Identify Work Scope generic practice (GP 1.1), 103

IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission), 10

IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)

definition of software engineering, 56@nd57

EIA 12207 standard, 10

overview of, 280@nd281

Standard Glossary of Software Engineering Terminology, 277

IEP (Integrated Enterprise Process), 35@nd36

Implementation, directing

Causal Analysis and Resolution process area and, 273

Configuration Management process area and, 242

Decision Analysis and Resolution process area and, 264

generic practices and, 111

maturity levels and, relationship of, 102

Integrated Teaming process area and, 252@nd253

IPPD process area and, 259

Measurement and Analysis process area and, 239

Organizational Environment for Integration, 266

Organizational Innovation and Deployment process area and, 272

Organizational Process Focus process area and, 253

Organizational Process Performance process area and, 268

Organizational Training process area and, 256@nd257

Process and Product Quality Assurance process area and, 240

Product Integration process area and, 248

Project Planning process area and, 234

Project Monitoring and Control process area and, 235@nd236

Quantitative Project Management process area and, 270

Requirements Development process area and, 244

Requirements Management process area and, 232

Risk Management process area and, 260@nd261

Supplier Agreement Management process area and, 237

Technical Solution process area and, 246

Validation process area and, 251

Verification process area and, 249@nd250

Implementation, verifying

Causal Analysis and Resolution process area and, 274

Configuration Management process area and, 242

Decision Analysis and Resolution process area and, 264

Integrated Teaming process area and, 253

IPPD process area and, 259

Measurement and Analysis process area and, 239

Organizational Environment for Integration, 266

Organizational Innovation and Deployment process area and, 272

Organizational Process Focus process area and, 253

Organizational Process Performance process area and, 268

Organizational Training process area and, 257

Process and Product Quality Assurance process area and, 240

Product Integration process area and, 248

Project Monitoring and Control process area and, 236

Project Planning process area and, 234

Quantitative Project Management process area and, 270

Requirements Development process area and, 244

Risk Management process area and, 261

Supplier Agreement Management process area and, 237

Technical Solution process area and, 246

Validation process area and, 251@nd252

Verification process area and, 250

Inconsistencies, eliminating, 53

INCOSE (International Council on Systems Engineering), 9, 281

CMMI Product Development team and, 50

definition of systems engineering, 57@nd58

and the GEIA, 59

Litton PRC and, 31

Independent Appraisal Team Lead, 33

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (film), 171

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

definition of software engineering, 56@nd57

EIA 12207 standard, 10

overview of, 280@nd281

Standard Glossary of Software Engineering Terminology, 277

Institutionalization, 68

Integrated Engineering Handbook, 40

Integrated Product Development Process Case Study, An (Aaron and Shaw), 275

Integrated Project Management process area, 87, 127@nd129

Integrated Supplier Management process area, 154@nd155

Integrated Teaming process area, 150, 219

ability to perform and, 252

commitment to perform and, 252

directing implementation and, 252@nd253

Maturity level 3, 261@nd263

verifying implementation and, 263

International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), 9, 281

CMMI Product Development team and, 50

definition of systems engineering, 57@nd58

and the GEIA, 59

Litton PRC and, 31

International Standards Organization (ISO), 53, 59, 277

IEC 12207 life-cycle framework, 42

IEC 15288 standard, 10

IEC 15504 standard, 11, 58

IPD-CMM (Integrated Product Development CMM), 59@nd60, 79

basic description of, 10

expected materials and, 71

process areas and, 61, 62

IPDP (Integrated Product Development Process)

flowchart, 38

Raytheon and, 37@nd39

IPPD (Integrated Product and Process Development), 149@nd152, 217@nd218

ability to perform and, 258

CMMI Steering Group and, 59

commitment to perform and, 258@nd259

concurrent engineering and, 7@nd8

Department of Defense support for, 59

directing implementation, and 259

extensions, 163@nd169

integrated teams and, 150@nd151

Maturity level 3 and, 257@nd259

organizational environments and, 151@nd152

selecting appropriate disciplines and, 163@nd169

verifying implementation and, 259

IPT (Integrated Product Team), 7@nd8, 35@nd36

ISO (International Standards Organization), 53, 59, 277

IEC 12207 life-cycle framework, 42

IEC 15288 standard, 10

IEC 15504 standard, 11, 58

J

Johnson, Samuel, 95

Jones, Daniel, 278

Juran, J. M., 4, 277

Juran on Planning for Quality (Juran), 277

K

Kennedy, John Fitzgerald, 79

King Croesus of Lydia, 191

KPA (key process areas), 112

L

Lamperti, Giovanni Battista, 19

Leadership

maintaining, importance of, 21@nd22

organization environments and, 227

Lean organizations, 16

Lean Thinking (Jones and Womack), 278

Legacy systems

implications for, sensitivity to, 53

process improvement and, integrating, 25@nd27

Lewis, Meriweather, 161

Lewis and Clark Party at Three Forks (painting), 160

Life cycle(s), 7, 8

EPIC, 40@nd42

ISO IEC 12207 framework for, 42

requirements development and, 221

risk management and, 218

standards and, 11

Limits of Software, The (Britcher), 3, 6, 275

Litton PRC, 31@nd32, 50

Lockheed Martin, 32@nd34, 50

M

Machiavelli, 49

Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, 13

Manage Configurations generic practice (GP 2.6), 104, 105, 111, 158

Managed capability level (CL 2), 98@nd99, 100, 101, 104@nd107

Managed processes

definition of, 68

institutionalization as, 228, 231, 233, 236, 239

Management

content classification and, 66

getting commitment from, 21@nd22

steering groups and, 25

"Manager overview" level, 66

Managing the Software Process (Humphrey), 277

Marciniak, Jack, 276

Masters, S., 276, 277

Matejceck, Jack, 276

Materials

expected, 66, 69@nd71

informative, 66, 72@nd75

required, 66@nd69

Maturity dimension, 101@nd103, 110@nd112

Maturity level(s), 101@nd103. See also specific levels

concept of, 81

definition of plateau stages by, 174

process areas by category with, 115@nd117

staged models and, 80

structure of, 102

Maturity level 1, 102. See also Maturity levels

Maturity level 2. See also Maturity levels

CMMI representation and, 87, 88

equivalent staging for, 91@nd94

grouping of process areas and, 116@nd117

selecting disciplines and, 168

selecting representations and, 177

staged models and, 81

Maturity level 3, 242@nd266. See also Maturity levels

CMMI representation and, 86@nd89

Decision Analysis and Resolution and, 263@nd264

equivalent staging for, 91@nd94

grouping of process areas and, 116@nd117

Integrated Teaming and, 261@nd263

IPPD and, 257@nd259

Organizational Process Definition and, 254@nd255

Organizational Process Focus and, 252@nd253

Organizational Environment for Integration and, 265@nd266

Organizational Training and, 255@nd257

Product Integration and, 246@nd248

Risk Management and, 259@nd261

selecting disciplines and, 166

selecting representations and, 177

staged models and, 81

Validation and, 250@nd252

Verification and, 248@nd250

Maturity level 4. See also Maturity levels

CMMI representation and, 86, 89

equivalent staging for, 91@nd94

grouping of process areas and, 116

Organization Process Performance and, 266@nd268

Quantitative Project Management and, 268@nd270

staged models and, 81

Maturity level 5. See also Maturity levels

Causal Analysis and Resolution and, 272@nd274

CMMI representation and, 86, 89

equivalent staging for, 91@nd94

grouping of process areas and, 116

Organizational Innovation and Deployment and, 270@nd272

staged models and, 81

Measurement and Analysis process area, 146@nd147, 225@nd226, 237@nd239

ability to perform and, 238

commitment to perform and, 238

context diagram, 147

informative materials and, 72@nd73

directing implementation and, 239

verifying implementation and, 239

Micro-code, 6

Miller, Henry, 49

Miller, Sally, 276

Mitre Corporation, 56

Model representations, 85@nd94. See also Models; specific models

equivalent staging and, 91@nd94

picking, 171@nd178

organizing process areas and, 88@nd90

selecting process areas and, 85@nd88

single versus dual, 194@nd202

Models. See also Model representations; specific models

additional options for, 200@nd202

basic description of, 4@nd5

proliferation of, 8@nd14

selecting appropriate, 169

source, 67@nd75

tailoring, 99@nd100, 186@nd189

unified, 199@nd200

Monarchies, 11@nd12

Monitor and Control the Process generic practice (GP 2.8), 104, 107, 111, 158

Monitoring process area, 153@nd154

Motorola, 50

Moving On Up: Data and Experience Doing CMM-Based Process Improvement (Hayes and Zubrow), 277

Munnis, P. E., 278

Murrow, Edward R., 95

N

NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), 46

NDIA (National Defense Industrial Association), 59, 282

Nez Perce Tribe, 161

NIH ("not invented here") culture, 45

Nin, Anaïs, 199

NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology), 13

Noncompliance issues, 225, 239

Northrop Grumman Electronic Sensors and Systems Sector, 35@nd37

Not Performed capability level (CL 0), 97@nd98, 102

NSA (National Security Agency), 10, 50

O

Objective(s). See also Goals

basic description of, 52@nd55

disciplines and, 166

legacy processes and, 26

measurement, 225@nd226

quality, establishing, 109, 158

Objectively Evaluate Adherence generic practice (GP 2.9), 104, 107, 158

Optimizing capability level (CL 5), 100@nd101, 102

Oracle at Delphi, 190, 191

Organizational Environment for Integration process area, 226@nd227

ability to perform and, 265

commitment to perform and, 265

directing implementation and, 266

Maturity level 3, 265@nd266

verifying implementation and, 266

Organizational Innovation and Deployment process area, 122@nd123, 214

ability to perform and, 271

commitment to perform and, 271

context diagram, 122

directing implementation and, 272

Maturity level 5 and, 270@nd272

verifying implementation and, 272

Organizational Process Definition process area, 118@nd119, 212

ability to perform and, 254@nd255

commitment to perform and, 254

directing implementation and, 255

generic practices and, 108

Maturity level 3, 254@nd255

verifying implementation and, 255

Organizational Process Focus process area, 119@nd121, 211@nd212

ability to perform and, 253

commitment to perform and, 252

context diagram, 120

directing implementation and, 253

Maturity level 3 and, 252@nd253

verifying implementation and, 253

Organizational Process Performance process area, 121@nd122, 213@nd214

ability to perform and, 267

commitment to perform and, 267

context diagram, 121

goals for, 67

directing implementation and, 268

Maturity level 4 and, 266@nd268

verifying implementation and, 268

Organizational Training process area, 123@nd124

Maturity level 3, 255@nd257

ability to perform and, 256

commitment to perform and, 256

context diagram, 123

directing implementation and, 256@nd257

verifying implementation and, 257

Out of the Crisis (Deming), 276

P

Pacific Bell, 50

Partial staging, 194@nd198

Patton, George S., 115

Paulk, Mark, 276, 277, 278

Paxson, E. S., 160

PCCB (process change control board), 35@nd36

People Capability Maturity Model (Curtis, Hefley, and Miller), 276

People CMM (Capability Maturity Model), 10, 276

Perform, ability to

Causal Analysis and Resolution process area and, 273

Configuration Management process area and, 241@nd242

Decision Analysis and Resolution process area and, 263@nd264

generic practices and, 111

Integrated Teaming process area and, 252

IPPD process area and, 258

maturity levels and, relationship of, 102

Measurement and Analysis process area and, 238

Organizational Environment for Integration process area and, 265

Organizational Innovation and Deployment process area and, 271

Organizational Process Focus process area and, 253

Organizational Process Performance process area and, 267

Process and Product Quality Assurance process area and, 240

Product Integration process area and, 247@nd248

Project Monitoring and Control process area and, 235

Project Planning process area and, 233@nd234

Quantitative Project Management process area and, 269

Requirements Development process area and, 243

Requirements Management process area and, 232

Risk Management process area and, 260

Supplier Agreement Management process area and, 237

Technical Solution process area and, 245

Validation process area and, 251

Verification process area and, 249

Perform, commitment to

Causal Analysis and Resolution process area and, 273

Configuration Management process area and, 241

Decision Analysis and Resolution process area and, 263

generic practices and, 111

Integrated Teaming process area and, 252

IPPD process area and, 258@nd259

maturity levels and, relationship of, 102

Measurement and Analysis process area and, 238

Organizational Environment for Integration process area and, 265

Organizational Innovation and Deployment process area and, 271

Organizational Training process area and, 256

Organizational Process Focus process area and, 252

Organizational Process Performance process area and, 267

Process and Product Quality Assurance process area and, 240

Product Integration process area and, 247

Project Monitoring and Control process area and, 235

Project Planning process area and, 233

Quantitative Project Management process area and, 269

Requirements Development process area and, 243

Requirements Management process area and, 232

Risk Management process area and, 260

Supplier Agreement Management process area and, 237

Technical Solution process area and, 245

Validation process area and, 251

Verification process area and, 249

Perform Base Practices generic practice (GP 1.2), 103, 104

Performed capability level (CL 1), 97@nd98

Phillips, Richard, 56, 278

Piloting, 167@nd168

Plan the Process generic practice (GP 2.2), 104

Plateau stages, definition of, 174

PMBOK (Project Management Body of Knowledge), 11

Practices, generic, 69@nd71, 74@nd75, 227@nd229. See also Practices, generic (listed by name)

capability dimension and, 96@nd101

Capability level 1, 103@nd104

Capability level 2, 104@nd107

Capability level 3, 107@nd108

Capability level 4, 108@nd109

Capability level 5, 109@nd110

common feaures and, 111@nd112

maturity dimension and, 110@nd112

selecting representations and, 177

Practices, generic (listed by name). Practices, generic

GP 2.7 (Identify and Involve Relevant Stakeholders), 104, 105@nd106, 111, 158

GP 1.1 (Identify Work Scope), 103

GP 1.2 (Perform Base Practices), 103, 104

GP 2.1 (Establish an Organizational Policy), 104, 111

GP 2.2 (Plan the Process), 104

GP 2.3 (Provide Resources), 104, 105, 111

GP 2.4 (Assign Responsibility), 104, 105, 111

GP 2.5 (Train People), 104, 105, 111

GP 2.6 (Manage Configurations), 104, 105, 111, 158

GP 2.8 (Monitor and Control the Process), 104, 107, 111, 158

GP 2.9 (Objectively Evaluate Adherence), 104, 107, 158

GP 2.10 (Review Status with Higher-Level Management), 104, 107

GP 3.1 (Establish a Defined Process), 108, 111, 158

GP 3.2 (Collect Improvement Information), 108, 111, 158

GP 4.1 (Establish Quality Objectives), 109, 158

GP 4.2 (Stabilize Subprocess Performance), 109

GP 5.1 (Ensure Continuous Process Improvement), 110

GP 5.2 (Correct Common Cause of Problems), 110, 158

Practices, specific, 69@nd71

Practice-to-goal relationship table, 73

"Pride, stealing with," notion of, 23

Problems, description of, 29

Process and Product Quality Assurance process area, 145@nd146, 225@nd226, 239@nd240

ability to perform and, 240

commitment to perform and, 240

context diagram, 146

directing implementation and, 240

verifying implementation and, 240

Process area(s). See also Process areas (listed by name)

basic description of, 60@nd63, 115@nd160

goals for, 66@nd67

maturity levels and, relationship of, 102, 115@nd117

organization of, 88@nd90

principles, summary of, 21@nd24

relationships between, 155@nd157, 204@nd205

selection of, 85@nd88

specific goals for, 67@nd68

Process areas (listed by name). See also Process areas

Product Integration process area, 74@nd75, 140@nd141, 222@nd223, 247@nd248

Causal Analysis and Resolution process area, 67, 110, 147@nd148, 227, 272@nd274

Configuration Management process area, 71@nd72, 144@nd145, 224@nd225, 241@nd242

Decision Analysis and Resolution process area, 148@nd149, 226@nd227, 263@nd264

Integrated Project Management process area, 87, 127@nd129

Integrated Teaming process area, 150, 219, 261@nd263

Measurement and Analysis process area, 72@nd73, 146@nd147, 225@nd226, 237@nd239

Organizational Environment for Integration process area, 226@nd227, 265@nd266

Organizational Innovation and Deployment process area, 122@nd123, 214, 270@nd272

Organizational Process Definition process area, 108, 118@nd119, 212, 254@nd255

Organizational Process Focus process area, 119@nd121, 211@nd212, 252@nd253

Organizational Training process area, 123@nd124, 255@nd257

Process and Product Quality Assurance process area, 145@nd146, 225@nd226, 239@nd240

Project Monitoring and Control process area, 67, 87, 126@nd127, 216@nd217, 234@nd236

Project Planning, 87, 125@nd126, 215@nd220, 232@nd234

Requirements Development process area, 86, 136@nd138, 221, 243@nd244

Requirements Management process area, 61, 67, 86@nd87, 134@nd136, 220, 231@nd232

Risk Management process area, 72, 131@nd132, 218, 259@nd261

Supplier Agreement Management process area, 130@nd131, 195@nd196, 216@nd217, 236@nd237

Technical Solution process area, 138@nd140, 221@nd222, 245@nd246

Validation process area, 142@nd143, 224, 250@nd252

Verification process area, 141@nd142, 223@nd224, 248@nd250

Process improvement

business objectives and, alignment of, 24

CMMI dimensions for measuring, 95@nd113

cost benefits of, 15

examples, 28@nd45

implementing, 19@nd45

infrastructure, building, 24@nd25

integrated, benefits of, 3@nd18

legacy processes and, integrating, 25@nd27

leveraging best practices and, 23

maintaining executive support and, 21@nd22

model-based, 4@nd5

principles of, 21@nd22

selecting targets and, 22@nd23

standards and, proliferation of, 8@nd14

starting, 20@nd24

Process management process areas, 117@nd124. See also Process management process areas (listed by name)

innovation and, 122@nd123

process definition and, 118@nd119

process focus and, 119@nd121

process performance and, 121@nd122

Process management process areas (listed by name), 117@nd124

Integrated Project Management process area, 87, 127@nd129

Organizational Innovation and Deployment process area, 122@nd123, 214, 270@nd272

Organizational Process Definition process area, 108, 118@nd119, 212, 254@nd255

Organizational Process Focus process area, 119@nd121, 211@nd212, 252@nd253

Organizational Training process area, 123@nd124, 255@nd257

Project Monitoring and Control process area, 67, 87, 126@nd127, 216@nd217, 234@nd236

Project Planning, 87, 125@nd126, 215@nd220, 232@nd234

Risk Management process area, 72, 131@nd132, 218, 259@nd261

Supplier Agreement Management process area, 130@nd131, 195@nd196, 216@nd217, 236@nd237

Project Attribute Form, 42

Product Development Team (CMMI), 50@nd54, 80, 202

CMMI representation and, 85@nd86

discipline dilemma and, 164

process areas and, 62

selecting representations and, 177

Product Integration process area, 140@nd141, 222@nd223

ability to perform and, 247@nd248

commitment to perform and, 247

context diagram, 140

directing implementation and, 248

generic practice elaboration and, 74@nd75

Maturity level 3 and, 246@nd248

verifying implementation and, 248

Project Management Institute, 11

Project Management process areas, 124@nd132, 215@nd220

Project Monitoring and Control process area, 87, 126@nd127, 216@nd217, 234@nd236

ability to perform and, 235

commitment to perform and, 235

directing implementation and, 235@nd236

goals for, 67

verifying implementation and, 236

Project planning. See also Project Planning process area

ability to perform and, 233@nd234

commitments to, 215, 233

directing implementation and, 234

monitoring projects according to, 216

parameters, estimates of, 215

requirements management and, 220

verifying implementation and, 234

Project Planning process area, 125@nd126, 215@nd220, 232@nd234

CMMI representation and, 87

context diagram, 126

Provide Resources generic practice (GP 2.3), 104, 105, 111

PSM (Practical Software and Systems Measurement), 282

Purpose statements, 72

Q

Q-Labs, 50

Quality Is Free (Crosby), 275

Quantitative Project Management process area, 129@nd130, 219@nd220

ability to perform and, 269

commitment to perform and, 269

context diagram, 129@nd130

directing implementation and, 270

equivalent staging and, 93

Maturity level 4 and, 268@nd270

organizational capability evolution and, 112@nd113

verifying implementation and, 270

Quantitatively Managed capability level (CL 4), 100, 102

Quantitative Supplier Management process area, 155

R

Radice, R. A., 56, 278

Raytheon, 37@nd39, 50

Representations, 85@nd94. See also Models; specific models

equivalent staging and, 91@nd94

picking, 171@nd178

organizing process areas and, 88@nd90

selecting process areas and, 85@nd88

single versus dual, 194@nd202

Requirements Development process area, 136@nd138, 221

ability to perform and, 243

commitment to perform and, 243

context diagram, 136

continuous representations and, 86

directing implementation and, 244

Maturity level 3, 242@nd244

staged models and, 86

verifying implementation and, 244

Requirements Management process area, 61, 134@nd136, 220, 231@nd232

ability to perform and, 232

commitment to perform and, 232

context diagram, 135

continuous models and, 86@nd87

directing implementation and, 232

goals for, 67

verifying implementation and, 232

Responsibilities, establishing, 24@nd25

Review Status with Higher-Level Management generic practice (GP 2.10), 104, 107

Risk Management process area, 131@nd132, 218

ability to perform and, 260

commitment to perform and, 260

context diagram, 132

directing implementation and, 260@nd261

Maturity level 3, 259@nd261

purpose statement for, 72

verifying implementation and, 261

Risk mitigation plans, 218

Rockwell Collins, 50

Roger, Bate, 275

Roles, establishing, 24@nd25

Roosevelt, Theodore, 19

Root cause, concept of, 110

Rules, defining, 53

S

Sacagawea, 161

Sand and Foam (Gibran), 171

SCAMPI (Standard CMMI Assessment Method for Process Improvement), 183@nd186, 187@nd188

Scientific Visualization Studio, 46

Scope, 59, 166

SEA (Software Engineering Australia), 282@nd283

SEA Japan (Software Engineers Association of Japan), 284

SECAM (Systems Engineering Capability Assessment Model)

basic description of, 9

SPICE concepts and, 58

SECM (Systems Engineering Capability Model)

Appraisal method, 179

basic description of, 10

focus areas in, 112

process areas and, 62

SE-CMM (Systems Engineering Capability Maturity Model)

basic description of, 9

EPIC and, 58

Litton PRC and, 31

release of, 58

THALES and, 43

SEI (Software Engineering Institute), ix, 4

basic description of, 283@nd284

classes, 23

CMMI Product Development team and, 50

development of the CMMI by, 49

Web site, 63

SEIR (Software Engineering Information Repository), 173

SEPG (software engineering process group), 24@nd25, 31

SEPI (System Engineering Process Improvement) initiative, 43

Shaw, R., 275

Sheard, Sarah, 11

Software Acquisition CMM

basic description of, 9

FFA-iCMM and, 29

Software CMM

advantages of, 172@nd174

assessments and, 179@nd180

Northrup Grumman and, 28

process areas and, 62

stages, 81, 82@nd83

Software engineering. See also Engineering process areas

concurrent, cross-discipline teams and, 7@nd8

definition of, 56@nd57

environment of the twenty-first century, 5@nd7

terminology, IEEE Glossary of, 277

Software Process Assessment, 11

Software Productivity Consortium, 11, 58

Software Product Engineering, 62

Solutions, description of, 29

Source models. See also Models

expected materials and, 69@nd71

goals and themes for, 67@nd68

informative models and, 72@nd75

required materials and, 66@nd69

SPC (Software Productivity Consortium), 284

SPICE concepts, 58

Stabilize Subprocess Performance generic practice (GP 4.2), 109

Staged models

advantages of, 172@nd174

basic description of, 80@nd83

Configuration Management and, 241@nd242

continuous models and, comparison of, 83, 175@nd176

dimensions for measuring improvement and, 96

grouping of process areas in, 115@nd117

maturity dimension and, 101@nd103

Measurement and Analysis and, 237@nd239

organizational capability evolution and, 112@nd113

organization of process areas in, 88@nd90

partial, 194@nd198

Process and Product Quality Assurance and, 239@nd240

Project Monitoring and Control and, 234@nd236

Project Planning and, 232@nd234

Requirements Management and, 231@nd232

summary of, 231@nd242

Supplier Agreement Management and, 236@nd237

tailoring, 186@nd189

Staging, equivalent, 91@nd94

Stakeholders

IPPD and, 217

managing the involvement of, 217

measurement data and, 226

relevant, identifying and involving (GP 2.7), 104, 105@nd106, 111, 158

requirements development and, 221

resolving issues with, 217

Standard Integrated Engineering Process, 40@nd42

Standards, proliferation of, 8@nd14

Steering Group (CMMI), 50, 59

Stovepipe models, 8

Subject Matter of Process Improvement, The (Ibrahim and Hirmanpour), 277

Supplier Agreement Management process area, 130@nd131, 216@nd217, 236@nd237

ability to perform and, 237

commitment to perform and, 237

context diagram, 131

directing implementation and, 237

partially staged models and, 195@nd196

verifying implementation and, 237

Supplier Selection process area, 153@nd154

Support process areas, 143@nd149, 224@nd227

Causal Analysis and Resolution process area, 67, 110, 147@nd148, 227, 272@nd274

Configuration Management process area, 71@nd72, 144@nd145, 224@nd225, 241@nd242

Decision Analysis and Resolution process area, 148@nd149, 226@nd227, 263@nd264

Integrated Teaming process area, 150, 219, 261@nd263

Measurement and Analysis process area, 72@nd73, 146@nd147, 225@nd226, 237@nd239

Organizational Environment for Integration process area, 226@nd227, 265@nd266

Process and Product Quality Assurance process area, 145@nd146, 225@nd226, 239@nd240

Sverdrup Technology, 39@nd43, 50

SW-CMM model

expected materials and, 69, 71

goals for, 67

process areas and, 61, 62

Systems engineering

basic description of, 57@nd58

capability model, 57@nd59, 275

Systems Engineering Capability Maturity Model, Version 1.1 (Bate), 275

T

Tailoring models, 99@nd100, 186@nd189

Technical Solution process area process area, 138@nd140, 221@nd222

ability to perform and, 245

commitment to perform and, 245

context diagram, 139

directing implementation and, 246

Maturity level 3, 244@nd246

verifying implementation and, 246

Tennyson, Alfred Lord, 209

THALES, 43@nd45

Thompson CSF, 43@nd45, 50

Tolkien, J. R. R., 65

Tower of Babel, The (painting), xiv

Traceability, bi-directional, 220, 231

Training. See Organizational Training process area; Train People generic practice (GP 2.5)

Train People generic practice (GP 2.5), 104, 105, 111

TRW, 50

Turner, Richard, 209

U

Unified CMMI (U-CMMI), 199@nd200

Unix in a Nutshell (Gilly)

U.S. Air Force, 50

U.S. Army, 50

Using an Integrated Capability Maturity Model (Ibrahim), 277

U.S. Institute for Defense Analyses, 50

U.S. Navy, 50

V

Validation process area, 142@nd143, 224

ability to perform and, 251

commitment to perform and, 251

context diagram, 143

directing implementation and, 251

Maturity level 3 and, 250@nd252

verifying implementation and, 251@nd252

Verification process area, 141@nd142, 223@nd224

ability to perform and, 249

commitment to perform and, 249

context diagram, 141

directing implementation and, 249@nd250

Maturity level 3, 248@nd250

verifying implementation and, 250

Verifying implementation

Causal Analysis and Resolution process area and, 274

Configuration Management process area and, 242

Decision Analysis and Resolution process area and, 264

generic practices and, 112

Integrated Teaming process area and, 253

IPPD process area and, 259

maturity levels and, relationship of, 102

Measurement and Analysis process area and, 239

Organizational Environment for Integration, 266

Organizational Innovation and Deployment process area and, 272

Organizational Process Focus process area and, 253

Organizational Process Performance process area and, 268

Organizational Training process area and, 257

Process and Product Quality Assurance process area and, 240

Product Integration process area and, 248

Project Monitoring and Control process area and, 236

Project Planning process area and, 234

Quantitative Project Management process area and, 270

Requirements Development process area and, 244

Risk Management process area and, 261

Supplier Agreement Management process area and, 237

Technical Solution process area and, 246

Validation process area and, 251@nd252

Verification process area and, 250

Vision, shared

IPPD and, 218

integrated teams and, 219

organization environments and, 226@nd227

Vocal Wisdom (Lamperti), 19

W

WBS (work breakdown structure), 233

Webster, R., 276

Womack, James P., 278

Work Scope, identifying, 103

Z

Zubrow, David, 276, 277

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