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Characteristics of Event-Driven Architecture

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How should the components work together to realize the desired functionality of an Event-Driven Architecture (EDA)? The authors explore the concept of loose coupling and the ways that an EDA needs to handle messaging between its components. With the key concepts defined, they then lay out a thorough definition of EDA, using an idealized EDA as an example.

Firing Up the Corporate Neurons

Getting to a complete understanding of event-driven architecture (EDA) takes us on a step-by-step process of learning. First, we discussed the enterprise nervous system and the way EDAs are formed by connecting event listeners with event consumers and event processors, and so on. Then, to explain how these EDA components will likely be realized in today’s enterprise architecture, we learned about Web services and service-oriented architecture (SOA). To get the full picture, though, we now need to get into depth on the characteristics and qualities of EDA components.

If the EDA components are like the neurons in the enterprise nervous system, then we need to understand how their “synapses” and neural message pathways work if we want to form a complete picture of EDA. We need to know how they actually can or should work together to realize the desired functionality of an EDA. In this context, we go more deeply into the concept of loose coupling and also explore in depth the ways that an EDA needs to handle messaging between its components. With the key concepts defined, we then lay out a thorough definition of EDA, using an idealized EDA as an example.

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