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The Web 2.0 Guy I Ain't

By  Nov 27, 2008

Topics: Network Security, Security

I've been using the Internet since 1995. Many of the "hip and cool" features that have emerged (and vanished) since then have never lured me for various reasons. Here's a non-conclusive list of Web stuff I don't do.

  1. File sharing. "File sharing" is a nice euphemism for piracy that dates back to the dot com era. I'm not a prude. Copyright violation is not something I endorse or practice but that's not why I abstain from this feature. Rather, the two main reasons for abstaining from file sharing are a) I can afford myself spending $10 on a CD which always sounds better than a compressed 128kbps wma file. b) File sharing is one of the biggest security and privacy threats on the Internet. Thanks, but no thanks!
  1. Second Life and Web-based games in general. I find it a huge waste of time. My First Life somehow interests me more.
  1. Facebook, MySpace and social networks in general. Again, a huge waste of time, and absolutely no added value. In addition, it's a serious privacy risk and most of all -- a concept I abhor. Just because 2,000 spammers are listed in my Friends list doesn't really make them my friends, nor does it make me more socially connected.
  1. Twitter and micro-blogs in general. I bet the whole word is holding its breath for my mundane updates :"had dinner at a dull restaurant", "watched the Big Brother/American Idol/The Moment of Truth again last night. Boring!" etc. etc. In short, twitter is for bored narcissists (not that there's anything wrong with that!) -- not for me.
  1. Reading other boggers' posts. Call me a cave man but I still find a full-blown article (not to mention books) written by a reputable publicist or a professional authority a more valuable and profitable means of acquiring knowledge.
  1. Flickr and photo sharing sites. It's a combination of 1, 3 and perhaps 4 above. I have nothing against this concept but I rarely bother to carry my camera with me to trips. Instead of concentrating on photography, I prefer to focus my attention on the trip itself.
  1. Instant Messaging. I used ICQ in the late 1990s for a short time until that cheeky application started to download ads into my computer. I decided to give ICQ the heave-ho and have never looked back since. IM is great if you're bored and spend your life tethered to your computer monitor. Otherwise, it's a huge waste of time and a wonderful way to get irritated by incessant nagging.
  1. Skype and other free phone applications. I still can spare a few pence for making real phone call every once in awhile. Besides, I hate the ads and the spam.  
  1. Googling myself. I have absolutely nothing personal against myself:) It's just that I don't want to know how many pirated copies of my books exist out there, and I don't have the time or the inclination to read thousands of pages that mention my name -- whatever they have to say about me. In fact, if you've reached this point of my post, my advice is: don't! Don't Google yourself. It's time consuming and besides, you might find some nasty comments left by anonymous users.
  1. Podcast. The concept could somehow work, but again, if you can't do it properly, and I mean, a full-blown studio production, with makeup, lighting, setting and editing -- don't even bother. It's one thing to read your guru's enlightening article. It's a completely different thing to see his flickering image in a poorly lit room, jotting indecipherable nonsense on a tottery whiteboard, uttering long "ummm"s and "errrm"s in between and having his glasses dazzle you with a reflection from the camera. Sorry, if you want my time and attention, make your podcast a worthwhile investment -- turn into a BROADcast!