Home > Blogs > Michael Galpin

RSS FeedSubscribeRSS details

Applying Refactoring Techniques, Part 2

This is the second post about applying refactoring techniques. In the first post, we looked at the JsonViewer application, and how I had to refactor it to satisfy a change request. In this post we will look at a deeper refactoring of that same application.

Continue reading...

By Michael GalpinOctober 22, 2008
Topics: Programming

Applying Refactoring Techniques, Part 1

It would not be honest for me to say that I Refactoring introduced me to refactoring techniques. Like most programmers, I have been refactoring code almost for as long as I have been writing code. It is much like GoF’s Design Patterns. You read the patterns and you recognize all of the times that you have been using that pattern, even if you had not known it by name.

Continue reading...

By Michael GalpinOctober 21, 2008
Topics: Programming

Super Smelly Code

Spotting code that needs refactoring is half the battle ... or maybe a third. Martin Fowler's Refactoring gives a nice list of things to look (smell) for. One smells that was particularly familiar to me was Parallel Inheritance Hierarchies.

Continue reading...

Refactoring and Performance

Refactoring is a book I've wanted to read for a long time, but never got around to until recently. I thought that I probably already knew the gist of everything I would read, thus it was not a priority. However, it did not take long for the text to surprise me and make me re-think some things that I have taken for granted.

Continue reading...

Who Shoud Refactor

Martin Fowler's Refactoring points out that framework builders often find themselves refactoring. Framework builders are surely the minority of programmers, even in Java. However, they are definitely not the only people who need to be refactoring. Pretty much everybody needs to refactor as a matter of course.

Continue reading...

Accessible Flash

The next-to-last chapter of Don't Make Me Think is about accessibility. This is one of the most misunderstood topics in web development, so I was please to see it tackled in this book. The material is a little thin, but makes some good points.

Continue reading...

Goodwill

If there is one chapter from Don't Make Me Think that I would recommend for everyone involved in making websites, it Chapter 10 "Usability As Common Courtesy." This is all about the things your site can do that is good or bad in the eyes of users. This is definitely a chapter you will read and find yourself nodding your head a lot. Hopefully you won't find yourself cringing because you realize that your site doesn't always Do The Right Thing.

Continue reading...

Hitting Home

A web site's home page is its identity, its most important page. It's also the biggest source of conflict and the hardest thing to get right. Don't Make Me Think chronicles the challenges -- and the politics -- of a good home page.

Continue reading...

Search

A lot of Don't Make Me Think concentrates on navigation as a major part of usability. In some ways this dates the book, as navigation is no longer the primary way people find things on sites. It's all about search now.

Continue reading...

No Thinking Allowed

Don't Make Me Think is an unusual book for me to read. I am not a designer, not by any stretch of the imagination. When it comes to User Experience, I know how to build things, but have never been too concerned about the effect things have on users. That is exactly why I wanted to read this book: to understand my co-workers better and for all of those projects where I have be both a designer and a developer.

Continue reading...

By Michael GalpinSeptember 7, 2008
Topics: User Interface (UI), Programming

Going Atomic

The performance benefits of the non-blocking, thread safe classes in Java 5 seems mystical. It was great to finally get a deep understanding of how this works thanks to JCIP. It also provided a nice opportunity to test this performance benefit.

Continue reading...

By Michael GalpinAugust 31, 2008
Topics: Programming, Java

Parallelizing Algorithms

One of the hardest things to do in concurrent programming is making your programs correct and concurrent. Even if you do that, making good use of concurrency is still very hard. Java Concurrency in Practice gives a lot of good information on this topic, and so I had to take some of these techniques for a test drive.

Continue reading...

By Michael GalpinAugust 23, 2008
Topics: Programming, Java

Page 1 2 Next >