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Using Higher Level Video Effects in Premiere 6.5

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Premiere 6.5 offers nearly 80 special video effects. Author Jeff Sengstack introduced several in the previous chapter. Here he takes readers on a tour of most of the rest (he saves the top-of-the-line effects for Chapter 13). Most Premiere how-to book simply gloss over video effects, expecting readers to discover their utility on their own. Sengstack believes these effects are a strong characteristic of Premiere and gives them all individual coverage including offering suggested circumstances for their use.

See all Sams Teach Yourself on InformIT Design & Creative Media Tutorials.

This chapter is from the book

Premiere's video effects run the gamut from simple to complex. They have a wide range of uses. Some you may rely on regularly, whereas others fill such narrow niches they may never see the light of day.

With 79 video effects staring up at you, it's darned hard to know when and why to use any one of them. In this hour I'll single out my favorites and try to make sense of the rest.

The highlights of this hour include the following:

  • Categorizing and simplifying Premiere's video effects

  • My favorite video effects and how to use them

  • The hidden power of QuickTime video effects

Making Sense of the Plethora of Video Effects

It's not easy wading through Premiere's 14 video effects categories, trying to unravel what their 79 effects do and how they do it (see Figure 12.1).

Figure 12.1 Premiere's 14 category names for video effects do not necessarily describe their contents.

Consider that some effects have multiple functions with numerous options. The QuickTime effect alone offers 15 effects with a dozen subeffects.

The categories themselves can be confounding. The Gamma Correction video effect is in the Image Control file folder but is also a feature of the Levels effect in the Adjust file folder. Convolution Kernel is in the Adjust folder but handles 10 different functions of effects in the Blur, Stylize, and Sharpen folders. And the Transform effect is not in the Transform file folder.

Some effects resolve rarely encountered technical problems, such as missing fields or "interlace flicker." Still others don't seem to achieve their stated purposes.

To minimize clutter, ease access, and keep things simple, I suggest you create several new video effects file folder categories: Technical Fixes, Color Appearance, Blur/Sharpen, and Specialized After Effects. You'll continue to use Distortion and QuickTime.

TIP

To create these new categories, open the Video Effects palette, click the fly-out menu triangle, select New Folder, and create your folders. Then drag and drop effect icons to the new folders.

Once you're done, delete the old file folder category names by selecting them and clicking the trashcan icon in the bottom-right corner. Actually, old folders never die, they "hide." If you select Show Hidden from the fly-out menu, you'll see the old, default categories at the bottom of the palette. No matter what you do, you cannot delete an effect from within Premiere.

There's a surprising amount of redundancy in Premiere's video effects. For instance, three effects create black-and-white video. To further eliminate clutter, I've selected the best of near-equals and placed the also-rans in one other category—Duplicates.

I'll take you through each of those categories, saving the specialized After Effects (AE) effects for Hour 13, "Wrapping Up Effects with After Effects." I'll also note my favorite effects and explain how to use them.

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