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Project Management Roots and Understanding the PMBOK Guide

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Gary Lister introduces his book, Mastering Project, Program, and Portfolio Management: Models for Structuring and Executing the Project Hierarchy, which aims to provide enabling support to the concepts and knowledge presented in the PMBOK Guide and found in the profession of project management.
This chapter is from the book

Introduction

Everyone manages projects; therefore everyone is a project manager. Whether you’re planning a surprise birthday party, repairing your car, cooking Thanksgiving dinner, or overseeing the construction of a battleship, you’re managing a project. You are a project manager even if you don’t have the official title. The tech sector, and in particular the information technology sector, has staked claim to the project management realm in recent years. It’s important that we not allow IT to dominate project management. We are all project managers, both in the general business world and life at large. For those seeking to learn the broad fundamentals of project management, the PMBOK Guide is an extremely useful reference document. It is often used as the foundation of general project management awareness and training. For project management professionals seeking certification from the Project Management Institute, understanding the PMBOK Guide is crucial. In fact, you will have to memorize much of it to pass your exam. It describes the portion of accumulated knowledge and experience of the entire project management community and profession that is generally accepted as applying to “most projects most of the time.” The first edition was good, every edition has improved, and the fifth edition is the best yet. But it can be difficult to teach, to learn, and to use. This book (and this series) aims to provide enabling support to the concepts and knowledge presented in the PMBOK Guide and found in the profession of project management.

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