Home > Articles > Security > General Security and Privacy

A Closer Look at the Fine Print in Privacy Statements

  • Print
  • + Share This
Most major companies (Novell, IBM, Oracle, HP, Microsoft, and so on) have very similar privacy statements. Zubair Alexander takes a closer look at the fine print in these statements: what type of data or personal information may be collected from you, and who it's shared with. What's in the fine print may surprise you.
Like this article? We recommend

Like this article? We recommend

Whether it's a privacy statement from your cable TV provider or a business web site, if you take time to read the fine print you might be in for a few surprises. Obviously, the companies provide these statements to meet legal requirements and to protect themselves from lawsuits. You can't blame them for that. They hire lawyers to make sure that every conceivable area is covered and nothing is left out. But I wonder how many people actually take the time to read one of these privacy statements and see what's inside. Let's face it; whether it's a privacy statement or a licensing agreement, most people don't take time to read all the boring details of legal mumbo-jumbo drafted by some attorney.

Fine Print for This Article

In this article, I'll help you take a closer look at one of the privacy statements from Microsoft and show you what you're agreeing to when you access their resources or use their products. I decided to use Microsoft's privacy statements as an example simply because a large number of people use Microsoft products. (Novell's privacy statements probably wouldn't generate the same level of interest.) I'm using WindowsMedia.com from Microsoft as an example, but I should point out that privacy statements from other companies such as IBM, Oracle, HP, and Novell have many of the same issues. In fact, if you examine privacy statements from several large companies, you might think that they were written by the same attorney with some minor changes. Although references are made to several organizations, this article is not meant to be a comparison of the privacy statements among these various organizations.

At the end of this article, I'll make some suggestions for customizing your settings in Windows Media Player, in case you're not thrilled about sharing so much personal information with the vendor.

  • + Share This
  • 🔖 Save To Your Account