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TIBCO Architecture Fundamentals: Basic Interaction Patterns

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In this chapter, Paul C. Brown examines the simplest possible interactions between two parties. He considers four of the most common ActiveMatrix protocol and transport options: SOAP over HTTP, SOAP over JMS, SOAP over ActiveMatrix Virtualization, and XML over JMS.
In this chapter, Paul C. Brown examines the simplest possible interactions between two parties. He considers four of the most common ActiveMatrix protocol and transport options: SOAP over HTTP, SOAP over JMS, SOAP over ActiveMatrix Virtualization, and XML over JMS.
This chapter is from the book

This chapter is from the book

This chapter examines the simplest possible interactions between two parties. The architecture pattern for these discussions (Figure 11-1) is, as you would expect, trivial. It consists of the two parties, here referred to as the service consumer and service provider. Despite the fact that we are referring to services, the patterns being discussed can be generalized to represent any interactions between two parties.

Figure 11-1

Figure 11-1 Architecture Pattern for Two-Party Interactions

Basic Interaction Pattern Overview

There are four basic message exchange patterns between the two parties: In-Only, In-Out, Out-Only, and Out-In. The In-Only pattern is shown in Figure 11-2. In it, the service consumer sends a single message to the service provider and expects no response. The intent is generally that the arrival of the input will trigger the service provider to do something useful. Common examples of this pattern include e-mails and text messages.

Figure 11-2

Figure 11-2 In-Only Pattern

The In-Out pattern (Figure 11-3), also referred to as the request-reply pattern, is a simple extension of the In-Only pattern that adds a response (the output) from the service provider. Here the intent is a bit more explicit: The service consumer provides the input and expects the arrival of the input to trigger the service provider to do something and then send a response. This is the pattern you encounter when you execute a search online: You submit the search terms (the input) and expect a list of "hits" as a response (the output).

Figure 11-3

Figure 11-3 In-Out Pattern

The Out-Only pattern (Figure 11-4) is very similar to the In-Only pattern, the distinction being that the single message is an output going from the service provider to the service consumer. Common examples of this pattern include announcements of various sorts. It is common in this pattern for there to be many service consumers for a given input (this will be discussed further in Chapter 12). When the service provider is a system of record for some information, this pattern is suitable for announcing changes to this information.

Figure 11-4

Figure 11-4 Out-Only Pattern

The Out-In pattern (Figure 11-5) extends the Out-Only pattern to include a response back to the service provider. A common example of this is an automobile recall notice: The manufacturer sends you a notification that there is a defect in your automobile that requires correction. The manufacturer expects a response from you to schedule an appointment and get the defect corrected. Another example is an offer that requires a response.

Figure 11-5

Figure 11-5 Out-In Pattern

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